Author One Hundred Years Ago  (Read 437325 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #330 on: January 13, 2016, 04:32:51 AM »
January 13 – WWI: Battle of Wadi: Ottoman Empire forces defeat the Allied British during the Mesopotamian campaign in modern-day Iraq.

death

January 13 – Victoriano Huerta, Mexican general and statesman, former President of Mexico (b. 1854)

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #331 on: January 13, 2016, 04:49:40 AM »
January 13 – WWI: Battle of Wadi: Ottoman Empire forces defeat the Allied British during the Mesopotamian campaign in modern-day Iraq.

death

January 13 – Victoriano Huerta, Mexican general and statesman, former President of Mexico (b. 1854)

Like trostol said, Victoriano Huerta, dead.

from Wikipedia:   The German-initiated plan for Huerta to regain the Mexican presidency through a coup d'état was foiled. After some time in a U.S. Army prison at Fort Bliss, he was released on bail but remained under house arrest due to risk of flight to Mexico. A day after he attended a dinner at Fort Bliss; Later he was returned to jail, and while so confined, died, perhaps of cirrhosis of the liver. While the main symptom was yellow jaundice, poisoning by the U.S. was widely suspected.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoriano_Huerta





 



 

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #332 on: January 13, 2016, 09:30:23 AM »
Japan drills Boy Scouts with rifles

Originally published January 13, 1916

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #333 on: January 13, 2016, 01:22:05 PM »
Like trostol said, Victoriano Huerta, dead.

from Wikipedia:   The German-initiated plan for Huerta to regain the Mexican presidency through a coup d'état was foiled. After some time in a U.S. Army prison at Fort Bliss, he was released on bail but remained under house arrest due to risk of flight to Mexico. A day after he attended a dinner at Fort Bliss; Later he was returned to jail, and while so confined, died, perhaps of cirrhosis of the liver. While the main symptom was yellow jaundice, poisoning by the U.S. was widely suspected.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoriano_Huerta


Interesting.  I saw a documentary that suggested the US had more than a strong hand in Mexican politics at this time, with the ambassador acting as a power broker, arranging arrests of political figures who threatened US business interests.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #334 on: January 13, 2016, 01:27:05 PM »
From the Seattle Star today.  Murphy's Roadhouse on Silver Lake is probably an ancestor to the current Emory's, where I've had many birthday dinners.  From Emory's website:

Quote
From 1910-1919, Pacific Highway was once the only road from Everett to Seattle, which today is the Bothell-Everett Highway. November 16, 1916, paving was completed on the entire Everett-to-Seattle portion of the Pacific Highway. The areas surrounding Silver Lake were all dirt roads.

People traveled to Silver Lake for many reasons, and still do. In the early parts of the 1900′s, businesses were built that provided bootleg alcohol during prohibition. It was far enough from the big city of Seattle that enforcement lacked. In an old Herald article, resident Don Bothne was quoted saying, “Row a boat with your girlfriend. Get a little moonshine”. It was convenient having Canada close for easier access to alcohol. There were resorts, restaurants, dance halls, and small stores.

These pics are probably from the 20s or 30s but they give the idea:



Silver Lake still has a funny little business district, though now surrounded by featureless suburbs.  There is a shockingly good French bakery there.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #335 on: January 13, 2016, 01:44:32 PM »
Some poignant cold-related stories from today's paper, and a pic of the streetcars in 1916.


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #336 on: January 13, 2016, 02:56:23 PM »
More Silver Lake:




One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #337 on: January 13, 2016, 03:27:57 PM »

 

Great photo, K.  I'm glad to see that I'm not the only time traveler on this thread.  Nice hat, by the way.  I must say, you and your lady friend did a good job of killing that bottle off.   That's not Trixie's sister, is it?  I doubt it...the gal in your photo looks a bit too refined.  Don't see your pipe anywhere...but I do see plenty of your pastry delights, scattered about on both tables.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #338 on: January 13, 2016, 03:52:36 PM »
Great photo, K.  I'm glad to see that I'm not the only time traveler on this thread.  Nice hat, by the way.  I must say, you and your lady friend did a good job of killing that bottle off.   That's not Trixie's sister, is it?  I doubt it...the gal in your photo looks a bit too refined.  Don't see your pipe anywhere...but I do see plenty of your pastry delights, scattered about on both tables.

Haha somewhere I have a photo of my great grandfather in just such a hat.  He was a small man, and the effect is comical.

Never fear, the pipe is nearby.  Ladies love it, as it is a sure way to get a man to sit quietly and agreeably for an hour or so while they prattle away.

Found it!  This is probably early 20s.


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #339 on: January 13, 2016, 04:14:39 PM »
Haha somewhere I have a photo of my great grandfather in just such a hat.  He was a small man, and the effect is comical.

Never fear, the pipe is nearby.  Ladies love it, as it is a sure way to get a man to sit quietly and agreeably for an hour or so while they prattle away.

Found it!  This is probably early 20s.



Wow!  Great photo, and thanks for sharing your family history. 

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #340 on: January 13, 2016, 06:23:37 PM »
The " Millinery" section in a Department store in Detroit from this era.   The lady who's face is reflected in the mirror appears to be pretty damn cute.

Note: I've cropped this from a larger photo to highlight the cuteness.    :P


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #341 on: January 13, 2016, 07:01:36 PM »
Two pictures from Detroit taken about 100 years apart - both looking west from the intersection of East Grand Blvd and Canton.

The first shows the Packard Automotive Plant under construction and the second is from Google streetview from 2015. 

What a difference a century makes.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #342 on: January 13, 2016, 07:38:46 PM »
The " Millinery" section in a Department store in Detroit from this era.   The lady who's face is reflected in the mirror appears to be pretty damn cute.

Note: I've cropped this from a larger photo to highlight the cuteness.    :P

A handsome woman, indeed, and some wild-looking hats!

I was admiring the Packard plant's bridge with the clock in your earlier post, guessing it to be a mid-century addition.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #343 on: January 13, 2016, 09:07:24 PM »
Boys - I've enjoyed this thread so much I thought we could play a little game.   

Mad Man Markum has finally come through and developed his time travel machine.   He has
given you three "silver bullets" that allow you to go any where humans have been up to 100
years ago.  Here are the rules:

1] January 1916 is the cut off.  Can't go back farther than that.
2] You are only an observer and can not affect or disrupt anything at that point in time.
     So no pushing Hitler out of a window.
3] However *you* can be affected - so choose carefully.   Perhaps strolling along the deck of the USS Arizona
    on December 7th, 1941 is not wise. 
4] You can bring any modern film or sound recording device along with you.   If the results of that
     change future history once you get back to the present than so be it - I'm looking at you Mr. Oswald.
5] You'll be at that location for a full 24 hours - so either pack a lunch or bring the appropriate coin to buy one    :P


I'll start things off..........

Event #1:   October 1st, 1932 at Wrigley Field, Chicago.
                   Babe Ruth's Called Shot in the World Series.    Did he or didn't he?   I am not sure that I really care but the
                  chance to walk around Chicago, grab a dog and a beer and watch Babe Ruth and some of the other greats
                  play is my guilty pleasure pick.       Whether Ruth truly called the shot is subject to debate but the blast
                  was launched almost 500 feet.   

                  Just watching this swing in batting practice would be awesome [hitch aside]:
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vet779K4d0

Event #2:  August 15th, 1945 at Times Square, New York City
                  VJ Day!  Party of the century............  'Nuff said.    I'm not really thrilled about being in crowds but I'd make
                  an exception for this one.   
                 
                   

Event #3:   June 6th, 1944  right offshore of Omaha Beach, Normandy, France
                   I struggle with this one a bit...........   My Dad served on Destroyers during WWII and his ship was there during the
                   invasion.   Initially his ship was held back to help guard against German E-Boats but after the Infantry
                   was hung up,  they were eventually sent in to help blast a clear path through the defenses.   They really were only
                   a few hundred yards from shore at the closest.      My Dad talked about the war but mostly the good times he had
                   - which he had alot of really.   Partying in NYC prior to escorting a convoy out,  checking out the chicks in Honolulu,
                   having shore leave in Ireland, etc.   He was involved in several invasions - Morocco, Sicily and Okinawa which he would
                   discuss but all he would say about Omaha Beach was "It was awful.  Someone really f*cked up".     Since I exist now, I know
                   we'll make it then so I think I'd tag along with my old man for that day - his battle station was top side so he had ring side seats.   
                   I'd risk the nightmares that would be sure to  follow.   The DLR camera would definitely come in handy for posterity.

                   

                 

It'll be interesting to see what some of the other Bell Gabbers come up with!

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #344 on: January 13, 2016, 11:16:49 PM »
Boys - I've enjoyed this thread so much I thought we could play a little game.   

Mad Man Markum has finally come through and developed his time travel machine.   He has
given you three "silver bullets" that allow you to go any where humans have been up to 100
years ago.  Here are the rules:

1] January 1916 is the cut off.  Can't go back farther than that.
2] You are only an observer and can not affect or disrupt anything at that point in time.
     So no pushing Hitler out of a window.
3] However *you* can be affected - so choose carefully.   Perhaps strolling along the deck of the USS Arizona
    on December 7th, 1941 is not wise. 
4] You can bring any modern film or sound recording device along with you.   If the results of that
     change future history once you get back to the present than so be it - I'm looking at you Mr. Oswald.
5] You'll be at that location for a full 24 hours - so either pack a lunch or bring the appropriate coin to buy one    :P


I'll start things off..........

Event #1:   October 1st, 1932 at Wrigley Field, Chicago.
                   Babe Ruth's Called Shot in the World Series.    Did he or didn't he?   I am not sure that I really care but the
                  chance to walk around Chicago, grab a dog and a beer and watch Babe Ruth and some of the other greats
                  play is my guilty pleasure pick.       Whether Ruth truly called the shot is subject to debate but the blast
                  was launched almost 500 feet.   

                  Just watching this swing in batting practice would be awesome [hitch aside]:
                 

Event #2:  August 15th, 1945 at Times Square, New York City
                  VJ Day!  Party of the century............  'Nuff said.    I'm not really thrilled about being in crowds but I'd make
                  an exception for this one.   
                 
                 

Event #3:   June 6th, 1944  right offshore of Omaha Beach, Normandy, France
                   I struggle with this one a bit...........   My Dad served on Destroyers during WWII and his ship was there during the
                   invasion.   Initially his ship was held back to help guard against German E-Boats but after the Infantry
                   was hung up,  they were eventually sent in to help blast a clear path through the defenses.   They really were only
                   a few hundred yards from shore at the closest.      My Dad talked about the war but mostly the good times he had
                   - which he had alot of really.   Partying in NYC prior to escorting a convoy out,  checking out the chicks in Honolulu,
                   having shore leave in Ireland, etc.   He was involved in several invasions - Morocco, Sicily and Okinawa which he would
                   discuss but all he would say about Omaha Beach was "It was awful.  Someone really f*cked up".     Since I exist now, I know
                   we'll make it then so I think I'd tag along with my old man for that day - his battle station was top side so he had ring side seats.   
                   I'd risk the nightmares that would be sure to  follow.   The DLR camera would definitely come in handy for posterity.


                 

It'll be interesting to see what some of the other Bell Gabbers come up with!

Brilliant idea, Walks!  I'll have to think about that, but VJ Day in Times Square sounds like a lot of fun, especially if you dressed like a sailor.

The rules are very good, although I suggest not allowing modern technology because that could cause problems if there are unfortunate complications caused by Rule #3. Instead, how about allowing people to use whatever equipment is avallable at any given time and bring back whatever they film and record?  Also, can we do something harmless but dickish to Hitler like taping a "Kick me" sign to his back or giving him a noogie if we have the opportunity?

Money wouldn't be a problem, because a lot of old paper money has very little collectible value and you could get some for not much more than face value. Once you were at your destination,  you could build a nice bankroll without attracting attention by using your knowledge of the future to place moderate bets with small-time gamblers.

It might be a good idea to find out what nasty diseases were going around at the time you're visiting and get any necessary shots! 






One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #345 on: January 14, 2016, 06:09:57 AM »
Boys - I've enjoyed this thread so much I thought we could play a little game.   

Mad Man Markum has finally come through and developed his time travel machine.   He has
given you three "silver bullets" that allow you to go any where humans have been up to 100
years ago.  Here are the rules:

1] January 1916 is the cut off.  Can't go back farther than that.
2] You are only an observer and can not affect or disrupt anything at that point in time.
     So no pushing Hitler out of a window.
3] However *you* can be affected - so choose carefully.   Perhaps strolling along the deck of the USS Arizona
    on December 7th, 1941 is not wise. 
4] You can bring any modern film or sound recording device along with you.   If the results of that
     change future history once you get back to the present than so be it - I'm looking at you Mr. Oswald.
5] You'll be at that location for a full 24 hours - so either pack a lunch or bring the appropriate coin to buy one    :P


I'll start things off..........

Event #1:   October 1st, 1932 at Wrigley Field, Chicago.
                   Babe Ruth's Called Shot in the World Series.    Did he or didn't he?   I am not sure that I really care but the
                  chance to walk around Chicago, grab a dog and a beer and watch Babe Ruth and some of the other greats
                  play is my guilty pleasure pick.       Whether Ruth truly called the shot is subject to debate but the blast
                  was launched almost 500 feet.   

                  Just watching this swing in batting practice would be awesome [hitch aside]:
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vet779K4d0

Event #2:  August 15th, 1945 at Times Square, New York City
                  VJ Day!  Party of the century............  'Nuff said.    I'm not really thrilled about being in crowds but I'd make
                  an exception for this one.   
                 
                   

Event #3:   June 6th, 1944  right offshore of Omaha Beach, Normandy, France
                   I struggle with this one a bit...........   My Dad served on Destroyers during WWII and his ship was there during the
                   invasion.   Initially his ship was held back to help guard against German E-Boats but after the Infantry
                   was hung up,  they were eventually sent in to help blast a clear path through the defenses.   They really were only
                   a few hundred yards from shore at the closest.      My Dad talked about the war but mostly the good times he had
                   - which he had alot of really.   Partying in NYC prior to escorting a convoy out,  checking out the chicks in Honolulu,
                   having shore leave in Ireland, etc.   He was involved in several invasions - Morocco, Sicily and Okinawa which he would
                   discuss but all he would say about Omaha Beach was "It was awful.  Someone really f*cked up".     Since I exist now, I know
                   we'll make it then so I think I'd tag along with my old man for that day - his battle station was top side so he had ring side seats.   
                   I'd risk the nightmares that would be sure to  follow.   The DLR camera would definitely come in handy for posterity.

                   

                 

It'll be interesting to see what some of the other Bell Gabbers come up with!

Cool, but why the 1916 cut off?  Wouldn't you dig talking to old Abe himself?  Abraham Lincoln was elected President of the United States on November 6, 1860.  Give it a month or so to settle in and set your time machine on December 6, 1860.  Why?  Because at that time, you would have had every right to request a meeting with the President.  Yes, old Honest Abe himself had an open door policy to anyone wishing to converse with him as he went about his duties as Prez of the United States.  Yes, do so, and tell him that he should avoid at all cost, attending any performance at Ford's Theatre due to the fact that he would be assassinated there.  And ol' Abe, mark my word, would chuckle and say, "Well, bless my soul, a man from the future.  So tell me, what's gonna' be the next step in technology, beyond the telegraph?" 



Yup, he looked just like this (in color.) But be forewarned, he smells a bit BOish due to that Washington D.C. humidity.  The practice of meeting everybody was discontinued when that pesky Civil War business reared it's ugly head.

So, OK, I'll play along.

Event #1.  Hawaii, anytime in the early thirties.  Before any Tom, Dick and Harry could visit there.

 
 
Event #2     August 4, 1962.  Outside of Marilyn Monroe's apartment the day before she was found dead.  Yup, I'm going to risk the "don't try to change the future stipulation."  Marilyn: "Oh, so your the one who was hired to make my plants healthier?"  Me: "Yes, Miss Monroe.  If you don't mind I'd like to check your indoor plants first."  Marylyn, with a beatific smile:  "By all means." 



Event #3  Turkey, New years Eve, 1986.  The great singer Zeki Muren gave an outstanding concert that to this day can be seen (snippet wise) on You Tube.  I'd like to see the whole thing live.  Zeki developed a pre Rolling Stones practice of having runways built off the stage so that he could sing and stroll right out into the audience.  I will purposefully position myself so that I will Meet Zeki's eye's after he exits the stage after a wondrous performance.   I will salute him and see if he returns it with a salute of his own. 



After this theme has run it's course, I think that it would be fun to expand it to three time visits to our favorite books, and our favorite movies.  Thanks Walks.   



 

   

 

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #346 on: January 14, 2016, 07:03:26 AM »
1916 cut off was to keep with the one hundred years ago today theme.   We lift that and I'm watching them put the cap stone on the Great Pyramid.

Good luck with Marilyn!!!!!!

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #347 on: January 14, 2016, 07:09:41 AM »
1916 cut off was to keep with the one hundred years ago today theme.   We lift that and I'm watching them put the cap stone on the Great Pyramid.

So true, and thanks for keeping within the 100 year limit.  I just wanted to put forth that info on Lincoln.  It is pretty cool to think that just anybody could go in and visit with him during the early days of his presidency.  Come to think of it, though, it would be pretty cool to witness that capping on the pyramid.  lol

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #348 on: January 14, 2016, 02:10:44 PM »
Boys - I've enjoyed this thread so much I thought we could play a little game...   

Cool idea!  Here are mine:



Helsinki, November 24, 1919 -- Sibelius conducting the final version of his fifth symphony in a Finland finally emerging from civil war.  I'm gonna need the best recording equipment I can afford for that one.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qrrGWESdHZY

Honolulu, just like Rix. I was thinking later 30s after the clipper flights started, since I'd love to see that take off.

I loved Hawaii so much but when I was there I was wishing for the old Honolulu portrayed in Charlie Chan.  I would not surf, or even get the hems of my linen suit damp; just walk around and take in the people, the cars, the palms, and plenty of cocktails at the old hotel.



Bow Lake, Washington, December 24, 1941 -- Great-grandparents' farm.

I know the scene well from staring at an old picture since I was a kid, wondering what they all were thinking.  Grandpa, just back from Indonesia, barely escaping the war (they, at least, knew it was coming over there), Grandma, looking gorgeous, all Grandpa's brothers who would soon be overseas fighting, and Grandpa's parents looking so kind and wise.  With a tree in the background topped by that famous star from A Christmas Story.  That image of keeping Christmas under the ominous cloud of war always seemed so bittersweet.

Plus I want to taste Grandma Hulda's baking, and her famous lutefisk.  Their reputation has haunted me for years.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #349 on: January 14, 2016, 02:16:29 PM »
Letter from the Department of the Interior to William F. (Buffalo Bill) Cody dated January 14, 1916.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #350 on: January 14, 2016, 02:27:24 PM »
Quote
On January 14, 1916, Ezra Meeker's (1830-1928) famous and faithful oxen, Dave and Dandy, arrive at the Washington State Historical Museum in Tacoma for permanent display. In life, the oxen were widely photographed and famous world-wide for pulling Meeker's covered wagon during his 1906-1908 and 1910-1912 cross-country expeditions to mark, map, and preserve the Oregon Trail. After being slaughtered, their bodies were preserved via taxidermy.



http://www.historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&file_id=7760

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #351 on: January 14, 2016, 02:32:25 PM »
Letter from the Department of the Interior to William F. (Buffalo Bill) Cody dated January 14, 1916.
very cool

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #352 on: January 14, 2016, 02:40:02 PM »
From Wikipedia:

Quote
On January 13 and 14, 1916 the dikes at several places along the Zuiderzee broke under the stress of a winter storm, and the land behind them flooded, as had often happened in previous centuries. This flooding provided the decisive impetus to implement the existing plans to tame the Zuiderzee. In addition, a threatening food shortage during the other stresses of World War I added to widespread support for the project.



I can't believe they're still dressed like that!


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #353 on: January 14, 2016, 02:40:32 PM »
very cool

Reading the rest of their archives, I am not sure they ever got their films. One set was delivered to the War Department, but it appears through several letters, that the film company may not have delivered the set promised to the DoI

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #354 on: January 14, 2016, 02:42:55 PM »
Reading the rest of their archives, I am not sure they ever got their films. One set was delivered to the War Department, but it appears through several letters, that the film company may not have delivered the set promised to the DoI

has any of the films been released or avail at the library of congress

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #355 on: January 14, 2016, 02:44:10 PM »
has any of the films been released or avail at the library of congress

I don't know. This is where I found the letter: http://www.codystudies.org/sagala/sources.php

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #356 on: January 14, 2016, 02:47:18 PM »
I don't know. This is where I found the letter: http://www.codystudies.org/sagala/sources.php

i didn't know he was film maker  Cody as Filmmaker

Throughout his years in show business, William F. Cody failed as often as he succeeded. Although the Wild West Show continued to be popular throughout the 1890s and the early 1900s, it became more and more difficult for Cody finance the show, and he came close to bankruptcy several times. One of the ways he avoided financial ruin was by negotiating a merger between his Wild West show and Gordon “Pawnee Bill” Lillie's Far East show in 1909.

While this temporarily saved Cody from bankruptcy, business was still hurting, and for that, Cody blamed the burgeoning film industry (New York Times, "Buffalo Bill's Failure," July 30, 1913). He believed filmmakers were stealing his business by making movies about the West, and considering how often they copied his signature style and conventions of his show, this was not an entirely unfair observation on his part. Cody was not one to be run off by competitors, however. In fact, in 1910, he went into the film business himself.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #357 on: January 14, 2016, 02:50:30 PM »
she would make a good guest 
Buffalo Bill on the Silver Screen : The Films of William F. Cody
by Sandra K. Sagala

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #358 on: January 14, 2016, 02:59:28 PM »
The great John McCormack recorded this song a hundred years ago, today.

https://youtu.be/e2rkcT0bryE

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #359 on: January 14, 2016, 03:13:59 PM »
The great John McCormack recorded this song a hundred years ago, today.

https://youtu.be/e2rkcT0bryE

Cool!  I've never heard the words.  Could serve as a theme for this whole thread.  Nostalgia's a powerful force, but it only hits some people.  I wonder if there's a genetic predisposition.