Author One Hundred Years Ago  (Read 438034 times)

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One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #480 on: January 20, 2016, 10:57:33 PM »
Thought it would be fun to start a thread covering what was going on 100 years ago.  Fellow BellGab history buffs, feel free to add to this thread, anything that applies to 1916.  In this case, I found out that something happened exactly 100 years ago today.
I may have mentioned it before, but in case I didn't this thread is great. It's pretty cool to see all this stuff from 100 years ago.  :)

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #481 on: January 20, 2016, 11:31:59 PM »
I may have mentioned it before, but in case I didn't this thread is great. It's pretty cool to see all this stuff from 100 years ago.  :)

Glad you like it Mr. C.  Yes, lots of stuff available to post on what happened exactly one hundred years ago to the day, but my top notch contributors have also brought up stuff that happened throughout the year as a whole, not necessarily on the exact date, one hundred years back. It is kind of amazing though, that there is so much info available on what was happening on any one day of the year.  If you come across anything of interest, please feel free to post it here.  Thanks for the kudos.     

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #482 on: January 21, 2016, 12:28:36 PM »
Giant skeleton with horns found... One of the clippings is from January 21, 1916, some are earlier.

Wonder which crate in the Simthsonian holds these bones.

http://greaterancestors.com/horned-giant-sulpher-springs/

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #483 on: January 21, 2016, 03:25:24 PM »
Giant skeleton with horns found... One of the clippings is from January 21, 1916, some are earlier.

Wonder which crate in the Simthsonian holds these bones.

http://greaterancestors.com/horned-giant-sulpher-springs/

I was watching an episode of Oak Island on my tablet when I turned down the volume during the commercials.  The eggheads who designed the streaming format were clever.  By trying to lesson my exposure to the commercials, they saw to it that the show itself would freeze up and send me back to the very beginning of the episode.  But I digress... I picked another show to watch and it was about a couple of dudes who were looking for the same horned creatures that you speak of.  One of them went into a cave and seemed to think that there was some promise of finding something in there.  And that's as far as I got.  Never heard of the show again.  I could remote view the situation but I've got this nasty feeling that I'd see a young, Abe Lincoln being cast out of the tribe because he didn't have the required set of horns.   

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #484 on: January 21, 2016, 03:37:29 PM »
Here is an interesting glimpse of early day prison reform.  Not the inmates, but the building.  I learned that a grand jury back then was utilized to not only decide on whether a person should be tried or not, but to also inspect prisons.  After congratulating the warden and his wife on a job well done in supervising the inmates, they report on the sad conditions of the building's basement.  Quote:  "There is an almost total absence of sanitary plumbing and the need for it is evident to even the casual visitor."  The group advises 116,00 bucks to solve the problem, or do what the last paragraph says.

http://www.hcgs.net/1916gj.html

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #485 on: January 21, 2016, 08:01:22 PM »
This ad in The Hummer (Houston, Miss.)  There will be an eye exam clinic in four more days.  Our chance to find out what an old time eye exam is like.  Also, we can get a pair of specs for as low as $3.00...not like those bargain types that are dangerous.



 

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #486 on: January 21, 2016, 08:32:57 PM »


Here is another Billy Murray tune called "Down in the U-17."  A German U-boat whose crew, according to the song, closes the hatch after fighting and spends the rest of their time dancing and singing.  Recorded exactly 100 years ago, today. 

(Press play in the box to hear the song.)
http://adp.library.ucsb.edu/index.php/matrix/detail/700002061/B-17047-Down_in_the_U-17

(I like the hollow coconut shell drumming at the end.)
   

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #487 on: January 21, 2016, 08:36:37 PM »
During 1916 the Alter Motor Car Company was producing 25 units a day from their factory located at 580 Farmer Street in Plymouth, Michigan.

The 1916 model Alter sported a 27 horsepower 4 cylinder engine and sold for $685.    The company would go under in 1917 and today there is only a single Alter car still in existence.   It currently lives in the Plymouth Historical Museum:




Here are a couple of pictures of the Alter Factory in it's prime:


What is pretty cool is that the factory still exists and produces products to this day.   It is currently the location of the
C.D. Sparling company which manufactures bathroom fixtures.    They have refurbished the site but have kept its
historical integrity:



http://www.cdsparling.com/about_us.htm

BTW - Plymouth Michigan was also where the Daisy Air Rifle Company got it's start


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #488 on: January 21, 2016, 08:41:52 PM »

What is pretty cool is that the factory still exists and produces products to this day.   It is currently the location of the C.D. Sparling company which manufactures bathroom fixtures.    They have refurbished the site but have kept its historical integrity:

Good for them!

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #489 on: January 21, 2016, 09:13:28 PM »

Here is another Billy Murray tune called "Down in the U-17."  A German U-boat whose crew, according to the song, closes the hatch after fighting and spends the rest of their time dancing and singing.  Recorded exactly 100 years ago, today. 

(Press play in the box to hear the song.)
http://adp.library.ucsb.edu/index.php/matrix/detail/700002061/B-17047-Down_in_the_U-17

(I like the hollow coconut shell drumming at the end.)

That's pretty wacky, and it makes me wonder if it was meant as some wartime mockery of the Germans, because some of the lyrics could be interpreted as suggesting more was going on than dancing and singing.  ;)

I finally read about Billy Murray, and "The Denver Nightengale" had an illustrious career.  He was one of the first recording artists and stars, and already had been recording for well over a decade in 1916.  I was surprised to learn he was forty in 1916, because he looks much younger in the pictures you've posted.  He was also the singer who led  the "follow the bouncing ball" movie theater singalongs that were popular in the thirties and forties.
 

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #490 on: January 21, 2016, 11:09:51 PM »
That's pretty wacky, and it makes me wonder if it was meant as some wartime mockery of the Germans, because some of the lyrics could be interpreted as suggesting more was going on than dancing and singing.  ;)

I finally read about Billy Murray, and "The Denver Nightengale" had an illustrious career.  He was one of the first recording artists and stars, and already had been recording for well over a decade in 1916.  I was surprised to learn he was forty in 1916, because he looks much younger in the pictures you've posted.  He was also the singer who led  the "follow the bouncing ball" movie theater singalongs that were popular in the thirties and forties.

Yeah, and I learned that he called his singing style "hammering" because he had to stand there and shout his singing voice into a recording horn.  Also, that he was married three times.  (Was that indicative of the Pre-Hollywood type back then?)  I wondered about the song too.  Of course, if we'd have started this thread a year ago we would have caught the sinking of the Lusitania by a U-boat.  Anti German sentiment must have been pretty high back then.  But, a lot can happen in a year and I'm sure there were lots of German folk living in the USA, so who knows.  Was Billy aiming the song at a select market?

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #491 on: January 21, 2016, 11:24:01 PM »
Yeah, and I learned that he called his singing style "hammering" because he had to stand there and shout his singing voice into a recording horn.  Also, that he was married three times.  (Was that indicative of the Pre-Hollywood type back then?)  I wondered about the song too.  Of course, if we'd have started this thread a year ago we would have caught the sinking of the Lusitania by a U-boat.  Anti German sentiment must have been pretty high back then.  But, a lot can happen in a year and I'm sure there were lots of German folk living in the USA, so who knows.  Was Billy aiming the song at a select market?
That's some respectable hammering for those times.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #492 on: January 22, 2016, 11:35:28 AM »
January 22nd was a Saturday

Canada decided it was in the best interests of the servicemen fighting the The Great War to withhold 50% of their pay until (and I assume if) they returned home to Canada.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #493 on: January 22, 2016, 02:08:33 PM »
That's some respectable hammering for those times.
If you look back at your (well, at least my) family tree you can find some weird things. One is many of the men had several wives (back then on the farms the women would just spit out kids until she was done for and childbirth itself wasn't as easy as it is now and everyone married younger.) Even odder (when I think about it for modern times) I've seen a few instances where after a wife died he married her unmarried sister! I know: smaller towns (if even in a town,) unmarried women were looked down upon and had no source of income, and a man with many children with no wife also would have problems raising them, etc but still sort of weird how that would go down.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #494 on: January 22, 2016, 02:13:35 PM »
The best case I found for doing genealogy is all the fun stuff you discover in piecing together a full family health portrait. Worried about Huntington's Disease? Oh, it's only what fragged old Uncle Elmer back in 1835.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #495 on: January 22, 2016, 02:20:11 PM »
I assume some of you are using this site:

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/

Here's a screen grab for y'all:




One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #496 on: January 22, 2016, 02:24:53 PM »
I assume some of you are using this site:

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/

Here's a screen grab for y'all:




I'd like you to post that link in this thread everyday please

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #497 on: January 22, 2016, 02:39:11 PM »
I'd like you to post that link in this thread everyday please

I have already "book-marked" it in my intar-tube browsers of choice.  I'd hate to do an further undue damage to this awesome thread by a daily spam of that magnitude.  I thought perhaps some of my fellow under-bridge dwellers could use and peruse the 85 different local papers from "this day 100 years ago" and photo-grab items of personal interest and share with the rest of us.

Hopefully, my slightly off-topic double post today is not a death-blow to this thread.  If so I would ask the moderators of this forum to please delete or move my libelous postings as appropriate.

Thank yew, for your interest...

Here's my new daily paper from 100 years ago (Aurora, MO  "The Menace" front page):


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #498 on: January 22, 2016, 02:50:22 PM »
I have already "book-marked" it in my intar-tube browsers of choice.  I'd hate to do an further undue damage to this awesome thread by a daily spam of that magnitude.  I thought perhaps some of my fellow under-bridge dwellers could use and peruse the 85 different local papers from "this day 100 years ago" and photo-grab items of personal interest and share with the rest of us.

Hopefully, my slightly off-topic double post today is not a death-blow to this thread.  If so I would ask the moderators of this forum to please delete or move my libelous postings as appropriate.

Thank yew, for your interest...

Here's my new daily paper from 100 years ago (Aurora, MO  "The Menace" front page):

No Pate, you are welcome here... Not too many random videos from 1916 😎

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #499 on: January 22, 2016, 03:02:54 PM »
If you look back at your (well, at least my) family tree you can find some weird things. One is many of the men had several wives (back then on the farms the women would just spit out kids until she was done for and childbirth itself wasn't as easy as it is now and everyone married younger.) Even odder (when I think about it for modern times) I've seen a few instances where after a wife died he married her unmarried sister! I know: smaller towns (if even in a town,) unmarried women were looked down upon and had no source of income, and a man with many children with no wife also would have problems raising them, etc but still sort of weird how that would go down.

It is indeed fascinating.  Have you ever noticed how lots of people claim that their European roots can be traced back to a keeper of the crowned jewels at The Tower of London?  I  once came across a printed and bound copy of my mom's family tree and wouldn't you know, there was Mr. Jewell's Keeper himself at the start of the book.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #500 on: January 22, 2016, 03:24:37 PM »
I assume some of you are using this site:

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/
 

I've been entering the date of whatever day 100 years ago and let my search engine find what it may.  Lots of newspapers come up, many from the Library of Congress and I assume those are safe to re-produce things from.  Lots of publications come up that belong to various historical societies and while at first glance, it appears to be ok to use their information, there are small print instructions that you should ask permission before using any info.  Same with photos.  I tend to look for ones that are in the Public Domain.   

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #501 on: January 22, 2016, 03:36:05 PM »
Woman's hockey team circa 1916.   I had no idea they played back then!



That's The Swastikas, a Canadian girls' hockey team from Edmonton inaugural season in 1916.

Before it became associated with the Nazis, swastikas had been used for hundreds of years as a symbol of good luck and prosperity; but we already knew that.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #502 on: January 22, 2016, 03:43:54 PM »
The National Park Service was founded on in 1916.   The National Park System of the United States is administered by the National Park Service, a bureau of the Department of the Interior. Started with the establishment of Yellowstone National Park on March 1, 1872, the system includes not only the most extraordinary and spectacular scenic exhibits in the United States, but also a large number of sites distinguished for their historic or prehistoric importance, scientific interest, or superior recreational assets. The National Park System is made up of 388 areas covering more than 84 million acres in every state except Delaware. It also includes areas in the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #503 on: January 22, 2016, 03:46:09 PM »
Woman's hockey team circa 1916.   I had no idea they played back then!

That's The Swastikas, a Canadian girls' hockey team from Edmonton inaugural season in 1916.

Before it became associated with the Nazis, swastikas had been used for hundreds of years as a symbol of good luck and prosperity; but we already knew that.

Nice find!  It looks like there were a number of early twentieth-century Canadian hockey teams, male and female, called Swastikas. Here's the Fernie Swastikas from British Columbia.



One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #505 on: January 22, 2016, 04:06:14 PM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=01oEH8DpTAc

Wow.  That is pretty darn cool hearing those old letters read in this current time.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #506 on: January 22, 2016, 04:08:10 PM »
Woman's hockey team circa 1916.   I had no idea they played back then!



That's The Swastikas, a Canadian girls' hockey team from Edmonton inaugural season in 1916.

Before it became associated with the Nazis, swastikas had been used for hundreds of years as a symbol of good luck and prosperity; but we already knew that.

Dude Dudette at top row far right looks like a guy with a woman's wig on IMHOP...but I will admit to being in love with the gal in bottom row, third from the left.  What a Hotie!  lol

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #507 on: January 22, 2016, 04:09:41 PM »
On January 22, 1916 the USS Duncan [DD-46] a Cassin class Destroyer was reactivated from the reserve fleet and placed back into active service.   She was launched on April 5, 1913 and commissioned on August 30, 1913.   After a very short run of active service she was placed into reserve in Boston on October 24, 1914.   

During WWI she performed convoy duties as an escort.   After the war she was decommissioned in 1922 and eventually scrapped per terms of the London Naval Treaty. 

Her namesake was Commander Silas Duncan who served during the War of 1812.   There have been three destroyers named after Commander Duncan.   



USS Duncan  DD-46

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #508 on: January 22, 2016, 04:11:09 PM »
Dude Dudette at top row far right looks like a guy with a woman's wig on IMHOP...but I will admit to being in love with the gal in bottom row, third from the left.  What a Hotie!  lol

Too funny!   She's on skates but there is no doubt she was 'full grown'   

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #509 on: January 22, 2016, 04:13:28 PM »