Author One Hundred Years Ago  (Read 438029 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #510 on: January 22, 2016, 04:21:31 PM »
Dude Dudette at top row far right looks like a guy with a woman's wig on IMHOP...but I will admit to being in love with the gal in bottom row, third from the left.  What a Hotie!  lol

She must have been the enforcer! 

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #511 on: January 22, 2016, 04:27:14 PM »
Cold hearted Limey bastard.

And yes, I know that is redundant.

 ::)  I got a chuckle out of it that's for sure!   

'tis why I posted it without comments.   Didn't want to spoil that experience for the listener.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #512 on: January 22, 2016, 04:43:32 PM »
I can't help posting things regarding my birthplace (Pittsburgh).

This is a photo taken in 1916 of the "The Point", which is part of what's called The Golden Triangle.  It shows the Exposition Hall with the amusement rides still intact. The country was bracing for its entry in World War I and the steel industry was cranking up to feed the war demand.  At this time in history Pittsburgh was still ranked in the top ten in terms of population, and was the undisputed king in terms of industrial output.



Now look at it now!

*Note - I couldn't find a pic taken from the angle of the one from 1916.  However, to put it in perspective, look where you see the 2 bridges meet in the old photo.  Now look at the fountain in the current pic.  That's where those bridges met.



One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #513 on: January 22, 2016, 04:45:13 PM »
I can't help posting things regarding my birthplace (Pittsburgh).

This is a photo taken in 1916 of the "The Point", which is part of what's called The Golden Triangle.  It shows the Exposition Hall with the amusement rides still intact. The country was bracing for its entry in World War I and the steel industry was cranking up to feed the war demand.  At this time in history Pittsburgh was still ranked in the top ten in terms of population, and was the undisputed king in terms of industrial output.



Now look at it now!

*Note - I couldn't find a pic taken from the angle of the one from 1916.  However, to put it in perspective, look where you see the 2 bridges meet in the old photo.  Now look at the fountain in the current pic.  That's where those bridges met.



Is that taken from the top of the incline tram at the fort?

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #514 on: January 22, 2016, 04:58:51 PM »
Is that taken from the top of the incline tram at the fort?

Yes sir...from the incline.  The fort (Duquesne) was located behind the fountain way back in the day.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #515 on: January 22, 2016, 05:13:22 PM »
I can't help posting things regarding my birthplace (Pittsburgh).



LoL.  I've done it too.......  Of course in mine the 1916 shot shows a structure of elegance and the current
shot shows the carnage of Detroit.


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #516 on: January 22, 2016, 05:19:58 PM »
LoL.  I've done it too.......  Of course in mine the 1916 shot shows a structure of elegance and the current
shot shows the carnage of Detroit.

Being from the 'Rust Belt' we have first hand appreciation of the history and how those industries changed America and the world.  We also share the nostalgia and sadness of how those industries disappeared.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #517 on: January 22, 2016, 05:25:41 PM »
January 22 Henri Dutilleux, French composer (d. 2013)

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #518 on: January 22, 2016, 06:22:36 PM »
100 years ago today, on January 22, 1916  W.E.B. DuBois had a urine test done at the Higgins Laboratories located at 40 East 41st street in Manhattan.

Unfortunately for Mr. DuBois, the results showed that  his cloudy urine had a "Heavy white flocculent"sediment due to large amounts of pus and mucous.

The report is publicly available for all to enjoy here:
http://credo.library.umass.edu/view/pageturn/mums312-b009-i180/#page/1/mode/1up


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #519 on: January 22, 2016, 06:27:47 PM »
100 years ago today, on January 22, 1916  W.E.B. DuBois had a urine test done at the Higgins Laboratories located at 40 East 41st street in Manhattan.

Unfortunately for Mr. DuBois, the results showed that  his cloudy urine had a "Heavy white flocculent"sediment due to large amounts of pus and mucous in his urine. 

The report is publicly available for all to enjoy here:
http://credo.library.umass.edu/view/pageturn/mums312-b009-i180/#page/1/mode/1up

Hahaha, my response to this was going to be:  "Yeah, that came up on my "Charlotte's Web Pus Urine" Google Alert too".  Then I realized that, yet again, I mixed up W.E.B. DuBois with E.B. White.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #520 on: January 22, 2016, 08:06:22 PM »
On January 22, 1916 the USS Duncan [DD-46] a Cassin class Destroyer was reactivated from the reserve fleet and placed back into active service.   She was launched on April 5, 1913 and commissioned on August 30, 1913.   After a very short run of active service she was placed into reserve in Boston on October 24, 1914.   

During WWI she performed convoy duties as an escort.   After the war she was decommissioned in 1922 and eventually scrapped per terms of the London Naval Treaty. 

Her namesake was Commander Silas Duncan who served during the War of 1812.   There have been three destroyers named after Commander Duncan.   



USS Duncan  DD-46

I've read up some on the second USS Duncan [DD 485].  She had a short career of only 6 months after commissioning and met a violent death at the hands of the Imperial Japanese Navy.   She was a Benson/Gleaves class destroyer (the same class of ship my Dad served on in WWII) and was commissioned in April, 1942 in
Kearny, New Jersey under the command of  LCdr. E. B. Taylor.   She remained in the Atlantic until late June when she headed for duty in the Pacific and was thrown into the crucible of the Guadalcanal campaign.   

On September 15, 1942 she was one of the DD's escorting the USS Wasp when the Wasp was sunk by torpedo's fired from the Japanese submarine I-19.   The loss of the Wasp was a terrible blow to the US Navy as it left the USS Hornet as the only available carrier to cover the entire Pacific Ocean [USS Saratoga and USS Enterprise were both damaged and under going repairs].   With no carriers available it would up to the ships of the line of both the US and Royal Australian Navies to try and stop the Japanese onslaught. 

USS Duncan was part of Admiral Norman Scott's Task Force 64 on the night of October 11th, 1942 traveling in "The Slot" area of the Solomon Island chain near Guadalcanal.    In what came to be known as the Battle of Cape Esperance, Scott's Task Force 64 would meet Admiral Aritomo Goto's Cruiser Division 6 on a dark, rainy night.   The forces would be pretty evenly matched - Goto would have 3 Heavy Cruisers [IJN Aoba, IJN Kinugasa and IJN Furutaka] plus two destroyers [IJN Fubuki and IJN Hatsuyuki] while Scott would have two Heavy Cruisers [US San Franciso, USS Salt Lake City], two Light Cruisers [USS Boise, USS Helena] and five destroyers [USS Farenholt, USS Buchanan, USS  McCalla, USS Laffey and the Duncan].  The US would have the advantage of the 'Sugar George' radar and the element of surprise while the Japanese would have the deadly 'Long Lance' torpedo while the American torpedo's were very ineffective at that time.

Goto's plan was to bombard the American Marine positions and airfield on Guadalcanal during the night with his three Heavy Cruisers.    The "Tokyo Express" as these missions were called by the Americans had never been interdicted before so Goto had no reason to suspect anything different this time.    However, Scott and TF64 laid in ambush awaiting for him this time around.  Using the rain squalls, the SG radar and pure luck, Scott was able to cross Goto's T in an almost text book ambush.   There were some communications issues between the American ships but in the end they did catch Goto completely by surprise and Goto would be killed early in the engagement when the bridge of the Aoba would be hit by US shellfire.  In the end, the Japanese Imperial Navy would lose the  Furutaka, with the Aoba being heavily damaged - the next day they would also lose three destroyers due to American air attacks.   The USS Boise would be hit in the forward magazine and took severe damage as a result.    The USS Farenholt would also take damage.

The USS Duncan would not survive the engagement.  Due to communication issues she would end up making a solitary torpedo attack on the Furutaka.  During this run, the Duncan would be mauled by both Japanese  and American gunfire, she would burn and later sink but fortunately 195 of her ships complement would be rescued. 

Norman  Scott would not have long to enjoy his victory at The Battle of Cape Esperance - he would be killed a month later aboard the USS Atlanta.   


USS Duncan [DD 485]


Admiral Norman Scott


Admiral Aritomo Goto




One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #521 on: January 22, 2016, 08:56:56 PM »
From The Fair Play (Mo.)  January 22, 1916.


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #522 on: January 22, 2016, 09:04:42 PM »
And this....ouch!


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #523 on: January 22, 2016, 09:56:25 PM »
From The Fair Play (Mo.)  January 22, 1916.

I bet that was the hot topic of conversation in the saloons that day!

The Fair Play was published from 1872 to 1961 in Ste. Genevieve, Missouri, which was founded in 1735 by French Canadian settlers.  It's the oldest existing European settlement in Missouri, and has quite an eventful history as a frontier settlement.

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87052181/

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ste._Genevieve,_Missouri

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #524 on: January 22, 2016, 10:05:49 PM »
And this....ouch!

Maybe she wasn't killed because she was wearing a hat she'd bought from the 1916 Sears catalog and it cushioned the impact.


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #525 on: January 22, 2016, 10:22:02 PM »
Maybe she wasn't killed because she was wearing a hat she'd bought from the 1916 Sears catalog and it cushioned the impact.
I hope the lady was all right...but I wondered...was she the actress playing Juliet?  If so, it wasn't very noble of Romeo not to try and catch her.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #526 on: January 22, 2016, 10:24:09 PM »
Here is an interesting, if somewhat macabre, item from The Day Book.  (Chicago, Ill.)


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #527 on: January 22, 2016, 10:32:01 PM »
I hope the lady was all right...but I wondered...was she the actress playing Juliet?  If so, it wasn't very noble of Romeo not to try and catch her.

I think you're right about her being Juliet, and that was rather ignoble of Romeo to just stand there twiddling his codpiece. Any idea if the paper gave updates on her condition in the following days?

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #528 on: January 22, 2016, 10:32:43 PM »
I hope the lady was all right...but I wondered...was she the actress playing Juliet?  If so, it wasn't very noble of Romeo not to try and catch her.

Update.  She survived!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percy_Haswell

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #529 on: January 22, 2016, 10:36:43 PM »
Here is an interesting, if somewhat macabre, item from The Day Book.  (Chicago, Ill.)

The Burgomaster sounds like a compassionate fellow. I wonder if he was re-elected. 

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #530 on: January 22, 2016, 10:38:22 PM »
I think you're right about her being Juliet, and that was rather ignoble of Romeo to just stand there twiddling his codpiece. Any idea if the paper gave updates on her condition in the following days?

I honestly didn't think to run a search on her until after the initial post.  Hate to admit it Robert, but I thought she was "small potatoes."  lol

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #531 on: January 22, 2016, 10:43:46 PM »
Update.  She survived!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percy_Haswell

She sounds like a real trouper with the kind of "the show must go on" spirit that wouldn't let a little thing like a twelve-foot fall stop her!

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #532 on: January 22, 2016, 10:50:00 PM »
I honestly didn't think to run a search on her until after the initial post.  Hate to admit it Robert, but I thought she was "small potatoes."  lol

That's understandable, because the brief mention the paper gave her made it sound like it was a community theater production.  Maybe it wasn't a bigger story because it was eclipsed by that stunning news about Saturn!

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #533 on: January 22, 2016, 10:52:03 PM »
On January 23rd, 1916 a massive cold front passed through Browning, MT and took the temperature from 44F to -56F over a period of 24 hours! This 100 degree drop still stands as the most drastic temperature change over a period of one day in U.S. history.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #534 on: January 22, 2016, 10:56:37 PM »
On January 23rd, 1916 a massive cold front passed through Browning, MT and took the temperature from 44F to -56F over a period of 24 hours! This 100 degree drop still stands as the most drastic temperature change over a period of one day in U.S. history.

And scientists wonder why animals are unearthed from long ago with vegetation in their mouths as if they were flash frozen. This sure sounds like it's plausible.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #535 on: January 22, 2016, 10:58:31 PM »
She sounds like a real trouper with the kind of "the show must go on" spirit that wouldn't let a little thing like a twelve-foot fall stop her!

And she was around 45 years old at the time of her fall.  Pretty lady...at least at the time this photo was taken.  (No mention of the fall in her bio.)


 

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #536 on: January 22, 2016, 11:15:10 PM »
And she was around 45 years old at the time of her fall.  Pretty lady...at least at the time this photo was taken.  (No mention of the fall in her bio.)



Maybe flimsy set construction was a common occupational hazard for actors in those days, and that particular fall was just one of many.  She may have cultivated that dense, luxuriant pile of ringlets to protect her from frequent falls! :D


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #538 on: January 23, 2016, 02:22:01 PM »
Here are a few more items that could be ordered from the Sears Catalog in 1916--some men's hats, teddy bears with battery powered glowing eyes that don't sound the least bit creepy, and a variety of complete mail order house kits which Sears sold from 19081940. It sold over 70,000 during that time, and there are a few of them in the town where I live.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #539 on: January 23, 2016, 02:57:48 PM »
Here's a page of 1916 Sears catalog children's costumes, which reflect the blithe cultural insensitivity of those simpler days. Note the swastikas on the wigwam, which were probably supposed to be Navajo "whirling log" symbols, and which they stopped including in their artwork after that Austrian asshat gave swastikas a bad name.