Author OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES  (Read 5670 times)

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OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #30 on: April 08, 2016, 09:50:44 PM »
I love old radios. Anything electrical thats got some serious age to it really. But radios are endlessly fascinating.

That looks fun. Beautiful ride. Lucky Jay. I enjoy watching Jay's Leno's Garage. People can say what they want about the man and his Late Night gig, but he knows his shit when it comes to cars. He has helped many vets out as well selling items from his collection. I like Jay.

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #31 on: April 08, 2016, 09:59:13 PM »
A low hum generally indicates a bad or corroded ground. Check your base plate voltage (carefully - you're dealing w/ high potentials.)

For a good place to start, check this page.

That's a sweet little Philco BTW. Classic style. :)

Thanks!  I don't touch anything.  I heard enough hair-raising stories from the repairman -- he seemed to get off on the danger hahaha crazy old coot.

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #32 on: May 17, 2016, 02:53:22 PM »
Here's a pic of William Harley & Arthur Davidson from 1914 on a true "Motor-bike" of their own creation.


OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #33 on: May 17, 2016, 02:56:09 PM »
1923 testing of a bullet proof vest.

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #34 on: May 17, 2016, 02:57:52 PM »
Did you guys know Fiat had a test track on the roof of their factory ?

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #35 on: May 17, 2016, 02:58:09 PM »
Here's a pic of William Harley & Arthur Davidson from 1914 on a true "Motor-bike" of their own creation.
Can you believe that this picture (or one like it) was actually a final answer on Jeopardy! celebrity challenge recently. And, worse, all got it wrong. "Wright Brothers," "Ernest & Young," and "Ford and Pontiac" were the wrong answers mentioned.

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #36 on: May 17, 2016, 03:00:44 PM »
This one is cool; a machine to test the wear on shoes.

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #37 on: May 17, 2016, 03:04:09 PM »
Can you believe that this picture (or one like it) was actually a final answer on Jeopardy! celebrity challenge recently. And, worse, all got it wrong. "Wright Brothers," "Ernest & Young," and "Ford and Pontiac" were the wrong answers mentioned.
LMFAO - I was yelling @ the contestants when that question was asked and not a one of them knew it. I couldn't believe it. :o

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #38 on: May 17, 2016, 03:10:46 PM »
Was Robby the robot modelled after this diving suit ?

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #39 on: May 17, 2016, 03:16:01 PM »
Was Robby the robot modelled after this diving suit ?

I don't know.  What I do know is that is one brave individual in that thing.

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #40 on: May 17, 2016, 03:35:17 PM »


Extra credit if you know what color this one should be:

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #41 on: May 17, 2016, 04:09:52 PM »
From humble beginnings...



A short few million years later the offspring of our origins can nao split and fuse atoms...





OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #43 on: July 07, 2016, 01:19:06 PM »
I am really into old technologies that were abandoned for obvious or odd or strange reasons. Feel free to add on to this thread, any old tech's that still amaze!

I am really into the history of  Stanley Steam cars, built by Stanley Motor Carriage Company. Although steam cars and vehicles had been pretty much been phased out by 1930, there was a period of 1902 to 1911 where Stanley couldn't be beaten. They had kick ass cars that were extremely fast.

In 1906, they constructed a race car using a frame built from a canoe cut in half for early aerodynamics. The two Stanley brothers were geniuses. That car went 146 miles an hour on the Daytona Beach track! In 1906!



In 1907, they tried again, and got the car up to 154 mph, but the car drove into a rut on the beach, and the boiler flew off and blew into the air. The driver, Fred Mariott was injured and so was the company.

Competitors used this accident to make steamers seem dangerous and tend to blow up. Which you heard about for many years and even today. Automotive Propaganda. But there was no report ever of a Stanley Steam ever blowing up because they built the engines with valves to off-set overheating.
But it was the end, the gasoline combustion engines were favoured and they would soon come with a very popular starter. Stanley Steamers were given a bad name, basically. Which is a real shame because I wonder how much another two decades of experimentation on steam engines for cars would have taken us. 

The following is one of my favourite videos on youtube. It is of the owner of a 1906 Stanley Vanderbilt Race Cup car. You will see him blast away other vehicles from the period and beyond. I talked to the owner and he told me he could get this beast going 110-116 mph.  His top speed is about 65mph in the video. Jay Leno has some excellent videos too of these beasts of a race car!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4rDjTN2JMs
Amazing, Peeve!  Thank you for sharing this with us! ;)

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #44 on: July 07, 2016, 02:09:48 PM »
Was Robby the robot modelled after this diving suit ?
Interesting.  It sure looks like it.

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #45 on: August 20, 2016, 12:49:26 PM »
The Nordsieck computer brochure - 1956 ?


from:   http://www.computerhistory.org/revolution/analog-computers/3/138

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #46 on: August 20, 2016, 12:54:55 PM »
Interesting.  It sure looks like it.
Can you imagine tripping over a rock on the bottom and falling face down. How the hell would you stand back up. That suit weighed 551 Lbs.

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #47 on: August 20, 2016, 01:11:50 PM »
Can you imagine tripping over a rock on the bottom and falling face down. How the hell would you stand back up. That suit weighed 551 Lbs.

The Space Shuttle EVA suits weighed about 310 pounds and all of their zero G training for EVA's was done in a giant pool. Lots of support divers in regular SCUBA gear to deal with any emergencies.

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #48 on: August 20, 2016, 01:35:48 PM »
310 lbs, displaced in water, is still a lot of weight to be moving around in. No wonder the physical training is so rigorous.


OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #50 on: August 21, 2016, 02:48:13 AM »
Here's a pic of William Harley & Arthur Davidson from 1914 on a true "Motor-bike" of their own creation.

This is, sorry to say, an Internet canard that has snagged many unwary viewers, including me (and Jeopardy, it seems).

These are two random brothers from Minnesota, NOT Harley and Davidson.  And what's incredible about it is that the first time it was published on the Internet was on a HD fanpage that not only correctly identified the subjects of the photo, but published a 1919 picture of Harley and Davidson themselves, looking much older and nothing like those other guys:



You can read all about the "real" guys, which includes the picture in question plus a scan of the original purchase receipt, on this site (scroll about 1/4 way down the page):

http://harley-davidson.oldcarandtruckpictures.com/

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #51 on: August 21, 2016, 02:54:40 AM »
Thanks for the clarification DPS.  :)

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #52 on: August 25, 2016, 05:17:38 AM »

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #53 on: August 25, 2016, 06:00:47 AM »
A good write-up on the Antikythera Mechanism with new findings.

http://www.nature.com/news/2010/101124/full/468496a.html

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #54 on: August 25, 2016, 06:24:25 AM »
The reason you can read this forum the way you do...the genesis of modern computers.


OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #56 on: August 25, 2016, 06:40:40 AM »
The reason you can read this forum the way you do...the genesis of modern computers.
Nice find YP.

http://www.colossus-computer.com/colossus1.html


Edit: I wonder if they took the movie name from this, i.e.  "Colossus, The Forbin Project"
         http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0064177/

OLD OLD OLD TECHNOLOGIES
« Reply #57 on: August 25, 2016, 08:11:35 AM »
Nice find YP.

http://www.colossus-computer.com/colossus1.html


Edit: I wonder if they took the movie name from this, i.e.  "Colossus, The Forbin Project"
         http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0064177/

If you ever get the chance, visit Bletchley Park. Fascinating stuff. And all that went on there was in total secrecy. To the point that married couples who'd worked there didn't tell their spouse they'd worked there.