Author Anyone here "prep" for anything?  (Read 3434 times)

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Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #30 on: August 31, 2015, 11:21:48 AM »
Everyone's "prep" should include knowing neighbors. If anyone thinks that survival alone for any length of time is possible... well good luck.

True.


Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #31 on: August 31, 2015, 11:53:46 AM »
Everyone's "prep" should include knowing neighbors. If anyone thinks that survival alone for any length of time is possible... well good luck.

Thats the main thing, and collect Bic Lighters, (will be great for trading, are light weight for carrying, and take up very little space) everybody will need one for something, even if its just starting a fire to heat something up.

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #32 on: August 31, 2015, 12:01:03 PM »
Everyone's "prep" should include knowing neighbors. ....

And knowing where they store their supplies.   ;)

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #33 on: August 31, 2015, 12:25:37 PM »
Thats the main thing, and collect Bic Lighters, (will be great for trading, are light weight for carrying, and take up very little space) everybody will need one for something, even if its just starting a fire to heat something up.

A former co-worker of mine is a big time outdoorsman and prepper, he stresses the trading aspect a great deal.  He's got 500 rounds of .223 ammo for just that purpose, as well as other items including batteries, disposible lighters, and drinking straw style water filters.  He's a fanatic about water, which I suppose makes sense.  He's never without at least one of those water filters whereever he goes, and stores/swaps out a couple hundred gallons of water (in five gallon plastic containers) on a rotating basis. 

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #34 on: August 31, 2015, 04:08:50 PM »
A former co-worker of mine is a big time outdoorsman and prepper, he stresses the trading aspect a great deal.  He's got 500 rounds of .223 ammo for just that purpose, as well as other items including batteries, disposible lighters, and drinking straw style water filters.  He's a fanatic about water, which I suppose makes sense.  He's never without at least one of those water filters whereever he goes, and stores/swaps out a couple hundred gallons of water (in five gallon plastic containers) on a rotating basis.

There is no doubt that, if the system collapses completely, all of those commodities will be beyond valuable. I have my doubts regarding a complete collapse.

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #35 on: August 31, 2015, 04:18:03 PM »
True.
And get to know LEOs, firefighters, doctors, etc who live in your neighborhood. They might have information, comms, and skills come the "collapse," or just in natural emergencies. Maybe even let through the picket lines, not shoot you, or let you leave a quarantined city, etc if they recognize you in the teeming mob.

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #36 on: August 31, 2015, 05:32:21 PM »
I always keep some of the usual emergency supplies around: food, water, candles, batteries, camp stove, etc.   But after losing power for 10 days following a big storm,  I learned on the first night I was missing an essential item.  (BTW, using a hammer to crush beans doesn't work)

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #37 on: August 31, 2015, 06:16:56 PM »
             Yo, Zen, my brutha, I'm starting to want to have a more in-depth discussion or suvival, prepping, etc. Do you know of any sites devoted to this but which are non-political and non-religious, just interested people calmly (ha) exchanging ideas? It's the politics and religion that always gets in the way and gets people shouting on each other. I just want to gather information and make knock-knock jokes. Even in the apocalypse we'll need knock-knock jokes.

i have always enjoyed Mother Earth News. they have a site  http://www.motherearthnews.com/

befriend a couple of lds mormons. you would be surprised at what they know of home preparedness. they can cover the knock-knock jokes too.  :o

for some, prepping becomes part of a lifestyle. for others, prepping is a lifestyle. for a minority, prepping is an outlet for anger (these are the ones to stay away from).

what i know on the subject is stuff i've learned in life. most of my younger life was spent on a farm. vacation as a kid was going to the vacation home where the closest man-made object in miles was a couple of remote missile silos. tar papered 4 room house, cast iron cook stove, hand pump at the kitchen sink, hand pump outside at the well, outdoor privy (a two holer no less! with the required phone book toilet tissue), a galvanized bathtub tin and the dreaded chamber pot. during that time, i would spend many days and nights in the surrounding woods. taking only some fishing gear, pocket knife, pellet gun, fire starting kit and a change of clothes (home being no more than 5 to 10 miles away).
i volunteered for every training program i could while in the military (though nothing more sever than SERE school for military aircrew, but did include arctic survival). just to see if i could do it, i lived on the streets of the california bay area for a month. i won't go into the two weeks i spent with the masai in kenya except to note it was similar to the months spent with families in a rather unusual part of arkansas. for real.

anywho... all of this taught me to learn, adapt and improvise. that is the true prepping. of course you could arm yourself to the teeth and take whatever you need  :P

i suggest you kill the power in your home for a few weeks to a month. before you do it, prepare for what you think you'll need. after you start, make a list of what you should have prepared for. personally, i think it is much more fun to kill the power at home... then go camping somewhere else.  8)

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #38 on: August 31, 2015, 06:25:08 PM »
Everyone's "prep" should include knowing neighbors. If anyone thinks that survival alone for any length of time is possible... well good luck.

this is very true. skill sets should be as diverse as possible. it also gives a reason to use that deck of cards for more than solitaire.  8)

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #39 on: August 31, 2015, 06:39:52 PM »
I always keep some of the usual emergency supplies around: food, water, candles, batteries, camp stove, etc.   But after losing power for 10 days following a big storm,  I learned on the first night I was missing an essential item.  (BTW, using a hammer to crush beans doesn't work)

yeah. many forget that one. i had to practice a bit to get the right grind for perc coffee. practiced brewing it too. i can brew cups that range from tasty water all the way to a buzz strong enough to actually perceive time around you slowing down. it is also handy to calm the crazed coffee deprived that come knocking.

like the avatar.  8)

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #40 on: August 31, 2015, 11:23:33 PM »
yeah. many forget that one. i had to practice a bit to get the right grind for perc coffee. practiced brewing it too. i can brew cups that range from tasty water all the way to a buzz strong enough to actually perceive time around you slowing down. it is also handy to calm the crazed coffee deprived that come knocking.

like the avatar.  8)

"Camp" coffee works for me...Essentially French Press without the press.  If you let the grounds soak in hot water x4 min or so, then use a fine strainer.  My everyday brew is drip by the cup.


Also, I must have about a dozen radios, mostly cool vintage items.  The one type of radio I don't have however is a portable AM/FM/SW/Weather, Flaslight, w/USB port for cellphone charge.  I want something lightweight that fits in a backpack, with multiple charging sources including solar, AC, rechargeable batteries, hand-crank, and under $100.

I've narrowed my search down to these two:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HMREOLK
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00VA1LKMA

Anyone have with experience with either of these?

I think portable radios like this are another essential item in an emergency, but could also be handy for camping, hiking.


Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #41 on: September 01, 2015, 12:45:47 AM »
"Camp" coffee works for me...Essentially French Press without the press.  If you let the grounds soak in hot water x4 min or so, then use a fine strainer.  My everyday brew is drip by the cup.


Also, I must have about a dozen radios, mostly cool vintage items.  The one type of radio I don't have however is a portable AM/FM/SW/Weather, Flaslight, w/USB port for cellphone charge.  I want something lightweight that fits in a backpack, with multiple charging sources including solar, AC, rechargeable batteries, hand-crank, and under $100.

I've narrowed my search down to these two:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HMREOLK
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00VA1LKMA

Anyone have with experience with either of these?

I think portable radios like this are another essential item in an emergency, but could also be handy for camping, hiking.

as far as i know, all multi tronics will have you cranking for hours to get a few minutes cellphone air time. a solar option is good for less hands on trickle charging of phones. i don't know much about the two you've listed other than what i read at the links provided. this one http://www.etoncorp.com/en/productdisplay/frx5 might be a bit out of your stated price range, but it's very nice. that link has other products along the same line.
i don't plan on having much use for a cellphone in a major emergency. they're nice as long as it can connect. plenty of other hand held devices for communication and listening on police bands. i don't have a ham license, but know how to use the equipment so as to not muck up lines of transmission. in a full blown melt down or immediate need situation, an unlicensed transmission  for help isn't going to be my first breaking the rules concern. if all else fails, i have personal locating beacons for anyone to hear and pencil flares if they can't. most places i backpack don't have marked trails.

another must is good first aid knowledge. i'm no emt, but i can do simple sutures, set simple fractures, control bleeding, etc. maybe provide enough time until expert help can be obtained. you can build a nice med-kit from the usual stores/online for less than what you might expect.

i learned how to forage gobs of years ago. as a backpacker it is a damned handy skill. less to carry that way too! lists can get kinda long, but there are lots of options to keep things portable and light. good quality multi-tool, several options for lighting a fire, thin braided wire (the kind used for wall hangings), couple of p-51 can openers (it is actually pretty simple to open a can without any tools other than a hard rough surface), options for water purification, knowledge on caring for your primary external bio suit (yer skin  ;D ), etc. everything i pack has been needed on past adventures.  8)

p.s. most might think all this is a bit extreme. just skills picked up along the path. i've not even applied for ninja school  ;) besides... ninja apparel is soooooo limited.


Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #42 on: September 01, 2015, 02:47:35 AM »
The items you've mentioned don't sound extreme at all.  I think "prepping" emergency supplies is wise for the usual weather-related disasters, earthquakes, etc.  Also if you're lost or injured on a hike and don't happen to have a personal locating beacon it's a good thing to have a charged cell phone to try and send a ping even if service is spotty.  I don't have to worry about medical emergencies, I'm an ER nurse.   

Another item under $100 I'm looking at is a foldable solar charger.

http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Solar-Charger-Reviews

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #43 on: September 02, 2015, 08:12:14 PM »
Aww, crap!

This thread reminds me that I "prepped" for some Navy Bean soup the other day by soaking some dry beans...

I bet they've sprouted by now...

I shall soon work on a new recipe, I will call it "Navy Bean Sprout Soup."

If edible;  details to follow in perhaps another thread.

      If you intend to live on beans during the apocalypse, you may have difficulty finding others to share your bunker.

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #44 on: September 02, 2015, 08:15:13 PM »
as far as i know, all multi tronics will have you cranking for hours to get a few minutes cellphone air time. a solar option is good for less hands on trickle charging of phones. i don't know much about the two you've listed other than what i read at the links provided. this one http://www.etoncorp.com/en/productdisplay/frx5 might be a bit out of your stated price range, but it's very nice. that link has other products along the same line.
i don't plan on having much use for a cellphone in a major emergency. they're nice as long as it can connect. plenty of other hand held devices for communication and listening on police bands. i don't have a ham license, but know how to use the equipment so as to not muck up lines of transmission. in a full blown melt down or immediate need situation, an unlicensed transmission  for help isn't going to be my first breaking the rules concern. if all else fails, i have personal locating beacons for anyone to hear and pencil flares if they can't. most places i backpack don't have marked trails.

another must is good first aid knowledge. i'm no emt, but i can do simple sutures, set simple fractures, control bleeding, etc. maybe provide enough time until expert help can be obtained. you can build a nice med-kit from the usual stores/online for less than what you might expect.

i learned how to forage gobs of years ago. as a backpacker it is a damned handy skill. less to carry that way too! lists can get kinda long, but there are lots of options to keep things portable and light. good quality multi-tool, several options for lighting a fire, thin braided wire (the kind used for wall hangings), couple of p-51 can openers (it is actually pretty simple to open a can without any tools other than a hard rough surface), options for water purification, knowledge on caring for your primary external bio suit (yer skin  ;D ), etc. everything i pack has been needed on past adventures.  8)

p.s. most might think all this is a bit extreme. just skills picked up along the path. i've not even applied for ninja school  ;) besides... ninja apparel is soooooo limited.

      Evil Twin, after reading this and your previous post, there's no doubt you are the manliest man among us. I put on a sundress and curtsy in your general direction.

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #45 on: September 02, 2015, 09:45:19 PM »
To the Evil Twin of Zen:

The simple can opener is called a p-38, NOT a p-51.

I still have one from the Nam. They came in "C" ration boxes.
 
Most of us had one on our dog-tag chains

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #46 on: September 03, 2015, 03:56:34 PM »
To the Evil Twin of Zen:

The simple can opener is called a p-38, NOT a p-51.

I still have one from the Nam. They came in "C" ration boxes.
 
Most of us had one on our dog-tag chains


Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #47 on: September 03, 2015, 04:28:13 PM »
      Evil Twin, after reading this and your previous post, there's no doubt you are the manliest man among us. I put on a sundress and curtsy in your general direction.


Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #48 on: September 04, 2015, 02:08:50 AM »

Tax-Free Prepping
« Reply #49 on: April 14, 2016, 04:36:01 PM »
I don't know if other States do this but next weekend those in Texas can buy prepping stuff (and stuff that can also be used in daily life, tailgating, camping, hunting, etc) tax-free.
http://kxan.com/2016/04/14/new-tax-free-weekend-aimed-at-emergency-supplies/
Things like:
Less than $3000

    Portable generators

Less than $300

    Hurricane shutters
    Emergency ladders

Less than $75

    Batteries, single or multipack (AAA cell, AA cell, C cell, D cell, 6 volt or 9 volt)
    First aid kits
    Fuel containers
    Ground anchor systems and tie-down kits
    Hatchets
    Axes
    Mobile telephone batteries and mobile telephone chargers
    Nonelectric coolers and ice chests for food storage
    Nonelectric can openers
    Portable self-powered light sources (hand cranked flashlights)
    Portable self-powered radios, including two-way and weather band radios
    Reusable and artificial ice products
    Smoke detectors, fire extinguishers and carbon monoxide detectors
    Tarps and other plastic sheeting

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #50 on: April 14, 2016, 06:02:48 PM »
Thesis defense. Academe's version of a firing squad.

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #51 on: April 14, 2016, 07:13:03 PM »
2 enemas before I go out drinking.

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #52 on: May 04, 2016, 12:42:38 AM »
All these zombie tv shows have got me prepping for the Zombie Apocalypse.

Anyone here "prep" for anything? CornHolebola edition
« Reply #53 on: March 24, 2020, 10:35:03 PM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVDDLEF0vTU

I don't know about this one, but maybe it is something to "do" with the 900lbs of powdered milk I impulse bought the other day...

-p

Anyone here "prep" for anything? CornHolebola edition
« Reply #54 on: March 24, 2020, 10:37:23 PM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVDDLEF0vTU

I don't know about this one, but maybe it is something to "do" with the 900lbs of powdered milk I impulse bought the other day...

-p

Only queers and steers consume powdered milk. Which one are you?

Anyone here "prep" for anything? CornHolebola edition
« Reply #55 on: March 26, 2020, 10:59:52 AM »
Only queers and steers consume powdered milk. Which one are you?

Yay!

Buddy, that's a great survival tip!  Your dooing something!

Yay!



---

Since it is planting time, or at least the prepper-nation-H phase of it, hear is another informational vidya:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ae4MfwcsX4E

Tomatoes are great for canning, they have naturally high levels of acid in them, think it is just some brine/salt needed to get them to keep through winter/spring to the next harvest season (think I see tomatoes around hear late July-ish through to the first freeze).  A bit early in the season right now for them to be out, but if you have seeds and the starter containers it is a good time to get the sprouts started in a south facing warm room, same with peppers.  Heck, about anything really.  I like yellow squash, tomatoes, cabbage and cucumbers.  Beets too, but those are difficult to do in a container garden...  I guess you can can the squash, but I just like to cook and eat them fresh...

I may try potatoes in the compost heap this year, have some old ones that have sprouted could just chuck them into the compost pile and let them do there thing and see if it works.

-p





Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #56 on: March 26, 2020, 02:38:50 PM »
Wife picked me up 41 cigars - Corona's (sounds about right) and just over $600. of highland single malt.  :)

#GoodWoman

..speaking of scotch; there is a new Glenlivet, Captains Reserve that doesn't disappoint like the 'Founders reserve' does. The Captains Reserve may be a limited time offer. Might pick up a few.

#LiquidGold

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #57 on: March 27, 2020, 11:17:01 AM »
Yes, I PREP.  Pre Exposure Prophylaxis(PrEP).  I use Truvada (emtricitabine/tenofovir).

Keeps the hiv at bay.

peace
Hog

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #58 on: March 27, 2020, 11:19:10 AM »
Yes, I PREP.  Pre Exposure Prophylaxis(PrEP).  I use Truvada (emtricitabine/tenofovir).

Keeps the hiv at bay.

peace
Hog

So you weren’t assigned female at birth? ???

Anyone here "prep" for anything?
« Reply #59 on: March 28, 2020, 08:48:11 AM »
So you weren’t assigned female at birth? ???
No, but I might as well have been with the "thimble" that I got kitted out with.  At least I'd be the chick with the big clit.

peace
Hog