Author Cooking With Chefist!  (Read 45810 times)

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Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #660 on: May 09, 2020, 02:25:53 PM »
Down in Gulf Shores Alabama now... seafood is amazing...blue crab gumbo...glad the thread is still going.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #661 on: May 09, 2020, 02:35:16 PM »
Down in Gulf Shores Alabama now... seafood is amazing...blue crab gumbo...glad the thread is still going.
If you are ever in central VA let me know.  Ill feed you well.  I just sort of resurrected it.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #662 on: May 09, 2020, 08:40:17 PM »
If you are ever in central VA let me know.  Ill feed you well.  I just sort of resurrected it.

Oh don't fall for Chefist chit.  We were supposed to go for Steaks and Scotch at 555 in Long Beach.  And checkout the local roller derby.  "Hit the bar paladin.  Start a tab in my name.  I'll catch up." 
Fucker never showed.
Fucker.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #663 on: June 23, 2020, 03:57:36 PM »
Slicing strawberries and sprinkling with powdered sucralose (basically splenda without the bulking agents that make up at least 95% of the volume) is a great way to enjoy sweetened berries.  Berries are among the most effective ways to neutralize its funny aftertaste.  Adding a pinch of vitamin C powder, too, helps retard spoilage like sugar and gives a pleasing tartness to otherwise characterless supermarket berries.

This is how I eat at home so I don't become a whale.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #664 on: June 25, 2020, 09:17:10 PM »
Oh don't fall for Chefist chit.  We were supposed to go for Steaks and Scotch at 555 in Long Beach.  And checkout the local roller derby.  "Hit the bar paladin.  Start a tab in my name.  I'll catch up." 
Fucker never showed.
Fucker.

I'm living in So Cal now...next time in town, let's get that drink and steak, man.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #665 on: June 25, 2020, 09:18:34 PM »
Slicing strawberries and sprinkling with powdered sucralose (basically splenda without the bulking agents that make up at least 95% of the volume) is a great way to enjoy sweetened berries.  Berries are among the most effective ways to neutralize its funny aftertaste.  Adding a pinch of vitamin C powder, too, helps retard spoilage like sugar and gives a pleasing tartness to otherwise characterless supermarket berries.

This is how I eat at home so I don't become a whale.

I recommend using red wine vinegar and lemon juice as an addition...marinate at least 1-2 hours...the flavor enhancement is amazing and you will not taste the acetic acid at all...

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #666 on: June 26, 2020, 06:39:29 AM »
I'm living in So Cal now...next time in town, let's get that drink and steak, man.

I'm not falling for that one, again.


Living in SoCal now?  How have you enjoyed Communism so far?

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #667 on: June 26, 2020, 09:08:11 AM »
I recommend using red wine vinegar and lemon juice as an addition...marinate at least 1-2 hours...the flavor enhancement is amazing and you will not taste the acetic acid at all...

Even better with red berries is Balsamic vinegar, not too heavy though.  Believe it or not, but strawberry/balsamic vinegar makes an "awesome sauce" for vanilla ice cream.


Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #668 on: June 26, 2020, 09:09:52 AM »
I'm not falling for that one, again.


Living in SoCal now?  How have you enjoyed Communism so far?

Don't be bitter...look me up when you are visiting.

It's bizarre with the Kung Flu...no traffic and no one on the streets...I kind of like it.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #669 on: June 26, 2020, 09:10:17 AM »
Even better with red berries is Balsamic vinegar, not too heavy though.  Believe it or not, but strawberry/balsamic vinegar makes an "awesome sauce" for vanilla ice cream.

Yes...I bet it would!

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #670 on: June 26, 2020, 09:37:29 AM »
Oh don't fall for Chefist chit.  We were supposed to go for Steaks and Scotch at 555 in Long Beach.  And checkout the local roller derby.  "Hit the bar paladin.  Start a tab in my name.  I'll catch up." 
Fucker never showed.
Fucker.
Ha!  Chefist was probably busy somewhere else in Nakatomi plaza.

http://youtu.be/I-NiRBdtdS4

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #671 on: June 26, 2020, 09:53:12 AM »
Ha!  Chefist was probably busy somewhere else in Nakatomi plaza.

http://youtu.be/I-NiRBdtdS4

People need to understand my responsibilities. Ha

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #672 on: June 26, 2020, 04:15:45 PM »
People need to understand

Do they even want to?

Look mang. It's like this: fealty. Swear it. And then, you and I can rule this world together, as we were always meant to.

We'll rule as two kings. (note: offer restricted to G.E.O. employees and their authorized representatives only. No flunkies, please.)

Cooking With Chefist! -Open face fried bologna, egg & cheese sammiches
« Reply #673 on: August 18, 2020, 10:56:52 PM »
Tonight's fucking awesome dinner:

 

Open Face Fried Bologna & Egg Sandwiches (garnished with American Cheese, Sweet Red Onion, Heirloom Tomato, and a Fat Slice of Butter) served with Chef pate's Paprika, Garlic, Parsley, Salt-Pepper Potato Chips cooked in lard and rendered beef fat.

Pairs well with a Miller High Life tallboy.

Fookin' bomb, yo!

-p

Cooking
« Reply #674 on: August 18, 2020, 11:02:01 PM »
cooked in lard and rendered beef fat.

Pairs well with a Miller High Life tallboy.

Fookin' bomb, yo!

-p

Faithfully delivered. Signed, (THAT WOULD BE AN ECUMENICAL MATTER), HOTSCOIDGASRWF

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #675 on: August 29, 2020, 02:10:14 PM »
8 hours into smoking a pork butt.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #676 on: August 29, 2020, 02:11:41 PM »
8 hours into smoking a pork butt.

They say you should consult a doctor if it lasts longer than 4 hours. ;)

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #677 on: August 29, 2020, 02:12:32 PM »
They say you should consult a doctor if it lasts longer than 4 hours. ;)
I usually just call the neighbors.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #678 on: August 29, 2020, 03:57:33 PM »
Even better with red berries is Balsamic vinegar, not too heavy though.  Believe it or not, but strawberry/balsamic vinegar makes an "awesome sauce" for vanilla ice cream.

You need to try a shrub. Look up "vinegar shrub" and you will find all kinds of recipes. Basically it is just vinegar, fruit and sugar put together for awhile. Then diluted with water (and then I often carbonate it.)

Very interesting tasting and somewhat refreshing drink.

Tonight's fucking awesome dinner:

 

Open Face Fried Bologna & Egg Sandwiches (garnished with American Cheese, Sweet Red Onion, Heirloom Tomato, and a Fat Slice of Butter) served with Chef pate's Paprika, Garlic, Parsley, Salt-Pepper Potato Chips cooked in lard and rendered beef fat.

Pairs well with a Miller High Life tallboy.

Fookin' bomb, yo!

-p

The chef at the whitehouse is going to have a tough time keeping up with your demands.  ;)

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #679 on: August 29, 2020, 11:28:01 PM »
You need to try a shrub. Look up "vinegar shrub" and you will find all kinds of recipes. Basically it is just vinegar, fruit and sugar put together for awhile. Then diluted with water (and then I often carbonate it.)

Very interesting tasting and somewhat refreshing drink.

...

I actually know a guy in town that produces for commercial sale bottled shrubs.  I know he does a strawberry one for sure, but I think he has other flavors as well.  One of my favorite bartenders in town, but I don't get to see him too often anymore as the place he used to work at on the street has shut down and he's off downtown in some fancy-pants uppity-type place (much like the one that used to be on my street...)  Dude is old-skool, has the waxed mustache and suspenders schtick usually when he tends bar.  Hah!

Yeah, they are good.  I can't remember if he would put gin or vodka in the ones he made at the bar, but they were damn good!

-p

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #680 on: August 29, 2020, 11:44:10 PM »
You need to try a shrub. Look up "vinegar shrub" and you will find all kinds of recipes. Basically it is just vinegar, fruit and sugar put together for awhile. Then diluted with water (and then I often carbonate it.)

Very interesting tasting and somewhat refreshing drink.

The chef at the whitehouse is going to have a tough time keeping up with your demands.  ;)

The tradition does in fact go back to ancient times.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posca

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #681 on: September 07, 2020, 03:01:53 PM »
Sweet Potato Gnocchi

2 - 4 people

INGREDIENTS

2 medium Sweet Potatoes

2 cups of flour ( we used gluten free) and 1/2 cup extra

2 tsp kosher salt

 DIRECTIONS

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Poke a few holes in the sweet potatoes with a fork, and then bake them for 40-50 minutes or until tender. Youll know theyre done when a fork can be pressed into the center rather easily. Set aside to let cool enough for you to handle them easily. This can be done ahead of time.
Combine the salt and 2 cups of the flour. Flour a work surface and pour your flour mixture onto the surface. Make a well in the middle of the flour.
Once the sweet potatoes are cool enough to handle, remove the skin and place them, one at a time, into the potato ricer or simply use a fork to get them smooth Place the potatoes right on top of the flour.
Once all of the potato has been riced/mashed, flour your hands and begin working the sweet potato into the flour. Continue to work the mixture until its fully combined. You dont want the dough to be sticky so keep adding flour until you get a nice dry dough. This *could* take a decent bit of extra flour if your potatoes were on the larger side.
Once fully combined, roll the dough into a ball and cut it into eight even pieces. Roll each piece into a long log thats about 1/2 an inch thick. Cut pieces the gnocchi into inch pieces. Gently toss each piece into flour to ensure that its dry and not sticky at any edges. Continue until youve cut out pieces from all of the dough.
Optional: using a gnocchi board or fork, press grooves into each piece of gnocchi.
The gnocchi can be stored in the fridge for 3 days, the freeze for a few weeks, or cooked right away.
TO COOK THE GNOCCHI:
Heat a pot of salted water to a boil. Add in the gnocchi and let cook for a couple minutes. Once the gnocchi floats to the surface of the water, let it boil for 30 more seconds and then remove it from the water using a slotted spoon.
Toss in your favourite sauce sage & brown butter, fennel & tomato, basil pesto, or lemon olive oil.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #682 on: October 04, 2020, 01:46:08 PM »
Tunis cake is a new one on me, thanks!  Will look it up.
Now I have to make one for Christmas.  And I have to make marzipan too.  Thanks you two.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #683 on: October 04, 2020, 05:20:04 PM »
Turkey en Croute

Ingredients

6 kg turkey breast , skin off, preferably higher welfare
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
olive oil
1 large bunch fresh thyme , leaves picked
1 x 340 g jar cranberry jam or cherry merlot
25 g dried porcini mushrooms
6 rashers quality smoked streaky bacon , thinly sliced
3 sprigs fresh rosemary
600 g mixed mushrooms , chopped
1 turkey leg
1 carrot , roughly chopped
1 leek , trimmed and roughly chopped
1 onion , peeled and roughly chopped
2 heaped tablespoons plain flour , plus extra for dusting
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 knob unsalted butter
2 x 500 g packets all butter puff pastry , chilled
Directions

Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/gas 4. Place the turkey breast upside-down on a board. Gently slice into the natural join of the breast muscle to open it out and make a sort of pocket. Season well and drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle over half the thyme leaves, then spread over an even layer of cranberry jam, pushing it into all the nooks and crannies. Fold it back into shape to seal the mixture inside swiss roll-stylie and push a few cocktail sticks into the seam to keep it together. Transfer the turkey to a roasting tray, season the outside with the remaining thyme leaves, a good pinch of salt and pepper and a drizzle of olive oil. Rub it all over, cover in tin foil and roast in the hot oven for 60 to 70 minutes, or until just cooked through using a thermometer, you want it to be 72C at the thickest point.

Meanwhile, soak the porcini in a dish of just-boiled water. After 5 minutes, stir with a fork so any bits of grit sink to the bottom. Add the bacon to a large frying pan with a splash of oil on a medium heat and fry for 5 to 10 minutes, or until beautifully golden and super crispy. Strip in the leaves from 2 rosemary sprigs for the last 30 seconds or so. Remove everything from the pan with a slotted spoon and set aside, leaving the bacon fat behind. Add the fresh mushrooms to the pan with a pinch of salt and pepper. Drain and chop the porcini, saving the water, then stir into the pan. Add a splash of the water, avoiding the grit, then cook for around 10 to 15 minutes, or until the pan starts to sizzle again and the mushrooms are golden, soft and sticky with caramelly edges.

To make the gravy, cut the thigh off the turkey leg and slash into it slightly. Throw the leg and thigh into a pot along with the carrot, leek and onion. Stir in the flour, add a good pinch of salt and pepper and 2 litres of boiling water. Add a heaped tablespoon of cranberry jam, the balsamic vinegar and remaining rosemary sprig. Bring back to the boil, then reduce to a simmer for around 2 hours, or until thick. Strain it through a sieve and reheat before serving.

When the mushroom pan is dry, add a knob of butter and toss to coat. Tip the mushrooms into the food processor and whiz until you get a good mixture of smooth and chunky. Leave to cool. Once the turkey breast and stuffing have cooled, you can get on with assembling the wellington.

Dust a clean surface with flour, then roll out each packet of puff pastry to the size of a shoe box (one will be the base, one the lid roll the lid ever so slightly bigger). Line a large roasting tray with greaseproof paper, dust with flour, then add the smaller piece of pastry. Spread half of the mushroom stuffing onto the middle of the base to cover an area the same size as your turkey breast. Remove the cocktail sticks, then place the turkey breast on top and spread the remaining stuffing over the top packing it all in and smoothing it out so that the whole breast is covered. Sprinkle with the crispy bacon and rosemary, then brush the edges of the pastry with beaten egg. Lay the second sheet of pastry over the top, gently mold it round the shape of the breast, pushing all the air out and seal together. Trim the edges to around 4cm, then pull, twist, tuck and pinch in the pastry (like in the picture).

Brush the whole thing with beaten egg then all the hard works done. Leave it uncovered in the fridge overnight until youre ready to cook. On Christmas day, cook at 180/350F/gas 4 for 50 to 60 minutes, or until risen, puffy and beautifully golden and the turkey is piping hot throughout. Remove from the oven and leave to cool for around 10 minutes before carving. Serve carved into 2.5cm with the gravy and all the usual. Christmas in a mouthful.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #684 on: October 04, 2020, 05:34:48 PM »
Leave it uncovered in the fridge overnight until youre ready to cook.

 

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #685 on: October 08, 2020, 12:56:03 AM »
I'm not falling for that one, again.


Living in SoCal now?  How have you enjoyed Communism so far?

For the win:

Small peen.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #686 on: November 15, 2020, 02:58:51 PM »
Does anyone have a good corned beef recipe and/or sauerkraut recipe?  Im craving a good Reuben and already know how to make a good rye bread.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #687 on: November 15, 2020, 05:06:50 PM »
Does anyone have a good corned beef recipe and/or sauerkraut recipe?  Im craving a good Reuben and already know how to make a good rye bread.

I do somewhere, I may dig them up if you want more info.  Kraut is pretty easy: 
    Basic Kraut
      Non-reactive container (personal order of pref:Glazed Ceramic, Plastic, Stainless?use HIGH quality, it could pit, or better yet use Plastic/Ceramic?)
      1lb Cabbage  (any cruciferous vegetable LEAVES probably not the florets of cauliflower or broccoli;  Kale even see below)
      Tsp Non-iodized salt(I use sea salt)
      Whatever WHOLE SPICES (or herbs) you think might float your boat.  I would add herbs after ferment before you can it if you use them more delicate flavor may not survive the ferment.  Click blue link above for basic recipe, & directions.
      Plate that fits inside container
      Weight that fits on top of plate
      ---------------
      Chop up leaves, mix in salt, stick in pot, put plate on top of cabbage and salt, put weight on plate, COVER it (or not, I like to limit the amount of wild yeasts) and stick it somewhere not freezing or broiling & "forget about it."  It will remind you and get rotten garbage stinky, don't mess with it, but inspect surface liquid for MOLD and get that shit out of there (why a cover is good).  Let it go until it doesn't smell freaking awful, then carefully and gently remove the weight and plate, carefully remove the very top layer and toss that it (or eat, probably won't kill you).  Put it in a container and Pasteurize then refrigerate (or not I think the liquid will technically be "Kombucha" which is hip with the kids and wierdos these days) or can and seal and store in cool darkness for awhile, fridge is best if you have space.  Enjoy immediately with a spoon?


      Corned Beef (or Pastrami which is smoked corned beef basically)
        Similar to kraut, only you put it in a brine with the meat (Brisket is "traditional", but I think any hunk o' meat will work from any animal...)
        in some sort of container and let it sit in the fridge for a few weeks, I typically go about three and use the HUGE ziploc bags inside a bus-tub.
        Blue link has somebody's "authentic recipe," but again you can use any spices you like.
        It is the salt/water ratio that is important and MUST USE "PINK SALT"  (not "Himalyan Pink Salt"?  have to look up if that has the NaNO₃)
        or your meat will turn grey and not stay pink, apparently this is for aesthetic reasons and may be omitted, I do not.
      [/list]

      Following are a few posts I found using the Broken Search feature/bug:

      I could go dig up the recipe.  I doubt it could be replicated exactly the way I did it, my friend grew the kale herself so it's not like a store-bought item.  The concept is pretty simple:  make sauerkraut with kale instead of cabbage.  When the ferment is done, add some vinegar and spices that you like or think you might like.  Pressure can the concoction and let it marinate for a month or two.  Open and sample, if it's good:  keep doing what you did.  If it sucks:  throw it away...

      I am already contemplating adding fresh mint leaves to the "kale-kraut" next thyme to make sure that the "mintiness" really pops.  If you like I can go dig up the recipe and you can try it yourself.

      I am not afraid of sharing the idea, it worked for me, might not for anyone else.  I haz mad chef skillz, yo.

      -p

      I absolutely love making sauerkraut. 25% red cabbage, 75% green... Add some caraway and some jalapeno peppers and salt.

      So I decided to try my hand at Kimchee. I bought everything from my local Asian store and mixed to together. I then opened the jar of fermented shrimp paste. Yes... fermented (rotting) shrimp (seafood) left for a month under the tropical sun and then put through a grinder. It smelled exactly how you might expect.

      I added a few scoops of this rancid, foul smelling paste to my fresh vegetables. And then I licked a tiny amount off of the spoon.

      Where I used to like Kimchee, I can no longer stand it. I immediately identify the rotting fish taste and my stomach tightens in anticipation of an emergency purge.

      My best advice is to avoid the Saeujeot- it is a waste product passed off as food.



      Prosit!



      -p

      ediot:  We Can Add [/list]
      Code: [Select]
      [list][/list]
        To the many and Varied List Functions Hear @ BellGab that seem to be broken... Lawd.  I give up.  This will probably result in a server crash and the end of Civilzation as we know it, APOGEES in Advance fellow
      belchanners.

      ToWitIot: OR, maybe some more ballots will be electronically switched somewhere

      3diot: [/list]

      Cooking With Chefist!
      « Reply #688 on: November 15, 2020, 05:15:20 PM »
      That is good advice from pate.  I would add from experience that garlic, which is often one of the seasonings suggested, gets increasingly pungent with age and will smell worse than the cabbage.  Far better to add it in cooking unless you love the stink.

      My uncle told me that as kids they would routinely raid the pickle barrels in his grandfather's basement, reaching through a thick layer of mold to do so.  We are far more fastidious these days about that sort of thing.

      Cooking With Chefist!
      « Reply #689 on: November 15, 2020, 05:15:36 PM »
      Thanks pate.