Gardens, Lawns and Such...

Started by chefist, June 10, 2015, 09:46:44 PM

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

chefist

Ok, I'll post a couple of pics of my raised beds...

I'm having problems loading the pics for some reason...hmmmm

chefist

ok, one of my beds...the other is a shot of the valley where Vazqeuz de Coronado came through in 1525 in the Coronado National Forest...

PathoJen

Quote from: chefist on June 10, 2015, 09:55:27 PM
ok, one of my beds...the other is a shot of the valley where Vazqeuz de Coronado came through in 1525 in the Coronado National Forest...
What are you growing? Kale? Tomatoes? What else?

PathoJen

Also, is there a benefit to having a raised bed? I guess you can store stuff under them.

chefist

Quote from: PathoJen on June 10, 2015, 10:03:14 PM
What are you growing? Kale? Tomatoes? What else?

yes...those and swiss chard...armenian cucumbers...basil, dill, italian parsley...just tons of stuff!

PathoJen

Quote from: chefist on June 10, 2015, 10:05:16 PM
yes...those and swiss chard...armenian cucumbers...basil, dill, italian parsley...just tons of stuff!
I have no idea what to do with chard. I've tried everything, from juicing it (kind of yucky) to chard tacos., and still it isn't my favorite.

chefist

an amuse bouche I made from Nasturtium flowers and leaves, basil, sharp cheddar and black russian cherry tomato...all from the garden (not the cheese) ;-)

chefist

Quote from: PathoJen on June 10, 2015, 10:07:48 PM
I have no idea what to do with chard. I've tried everything, from juicing it (kind of yucky) to chard tacos., and still it isn't my favorite.

I juice it but prefer the collard greens that you see...they are the best in my opinion for juicing...

nbirnes

Quote from: PathoJen on June 10, 2015, 10:07:48 PM
I have no idea what to do with chard. I've tried everything, from juicing it (kind of yucky) to chard tacos., and still it isn't my favorite.

My mom used to make "greens and beans" from her chard. In a huge pot with a broomstick as a stirrer. Pasta fasoool.

I was so glad to find out when I was researching the ketogenic diet that chard should always be eaten really cooked, if at all.

nbirnes

Quote from: chefist on June 10, 2015, 10:10:57 PM
an amouche bouche I made from Nasturtium flowers and leaves, basil, sharp cheddar and black russian cherry tomato...all from the garden (not the cheese) ;-)

... my bouche would be so darn amused with this ...

chefist

Quote from: nbirnes on June 10, 2015, 10:13:24 PM
My mom used to make "greens and beans" from her chard. In a huge pot with a broomstick as a stirrer. Pasta fasoool.

I was so glad to find out when I was researching the ketogenic diet that chard should always be eaten really cooked, if at all.

that's good to know, Nancy! Thanks...

chefist

Quote from: nbirnes on June 10, 2015, 10:14:29 PM
... my bouche would be so darn amused with this ...

oh it would...it really turned out great! My sis was visiting and she loved it! drizzled really good olive oil on it!

The General

Nothing fancy like raised beds, but we're growing lots of food this year.
Peas, cucumbers, onions, tomatoes, raspberries, strawberries, potatoes, chives, fennel, rosemary, lemon balm, mint, oregano, cabbage, cilantro, dill, thyme, lettuce, beans, carrots...

chefist

Quote from: The General on June 10, 2015, 10:47:40 PM
Nothing fancy like raised beds, but we're growing lots of food this year.
Peas, cucumbers, onions, tomatoes, raspberries, strawberries, potatoes, chives, fennel, rosemary, lemon balm, mint, oregano, cabbage, cilantro, dill, thyme, lettuce, beans, carrots...

Looks great! Raised beds are necessity here in the desert...the caliche soil cannot sustain growth...

SciFiAuthor

Quote from: PathoJen on June 10, 2015, 10:04:15 PM
Also, is there a benefit to having a raised bed? I guess you can store stuff under them.

Mainly a soil choice advantage. You can use whatever soil mix you like for filling one. In my case I literally live 100 yards from the Mississippi river up on a bluff, so my natural soil is clay and rock -- awful for growing veggies. So I built raised beds and brought in soil, peat, etc. to customize what I'm growing in. Works great.

SciFiAuthor

Quote from: The General on June 10, 2015, 10:47:40 PM
Nothing fancy like raised beds, but we're growing lots of food this year.
Peas, cucumbers, onions, tomatoes, raspberries, strawberries, potatoes, chives, fennel, rosemary, lemon balm, mint, oregano, cabbage, cilantro, dill, thyme, lettuce, beans, carrots...

Attractive layout though. Almost an edible landscape vibe.

Quote from: PathoJen on June 10, 2015, 10:04:15 PM
Also, is there a benefit to having a raised bed? I guess you can store stuff under them.

It's often an easier solution than digging out and trying to replace or amend bad soil.  It took me weeks of long days swinging a pickaxe to dig out a small plot and to get rid of all the big rocks, and then weeks again this year to sieve out all the small rocks.  Not so bad if you can afford a backhoe and have somewhere to dispose the old dirt & can afford to replace it.  Also, beds warm up quicker in the spring so you can plant earlier and are probably easier to work around and maintain.

SciFiAuthor

Quote from: PathoJen on June 10, 2015, 10:07:48 PM
I have no idea what to do with chard. I've tried everything, from juicing it (kind of yucky) to chard tacos., and still it isn't my favorite.

I've found several interesting uses for chard. One is for the stems. As the season goes on and the heat sets in, chard goes bitter in my area. But the celery-like stems don't, so I use them in vegetable soup like you might use celery. When I can harvest the leaves I usually sautee it in olive oil. Overall though, it's not my favorite either. I generally grow the "brite lites" variety more as an ornamental. 

SciFiAuthor

Quote from: Georgie For President 2216 on June 10, 2015, 11:10:08 PM
It's often an easier solution than digging out and trying to replace or amend bad soil.  It took me weeks of long days swinging a pickaxe to dig out a small plot and to get rid of all the big rocks, and then weeks again this year to sieve out all the small rocks.  Not so bad if you can afford a backhoe and have somewhere to dispose the old dirt & can afford to replace it.  Also, beds warm up quicker in the spring so you can plant earlier and are probably easier to work around and maintain.

Yikes. I hate rocks. That was another reason I use raised beds. My natural soil is just loaded with rocks.

The General

Quote from: SciFiAuthor on June 10, 2015, 11:09:34 PM
Attractive layout though. Almost an edible landscape vibe.
Thanks, it's more of a white trash backyard vibe right now, but we're working on the edible landscape part.

PathoJen

Quote from: SciFiAuthor on June 10, 2015, 11:14:09 PM
I've found several interesting uses for chard. One is for the stems. As the season goes on and the heat sets in, chard goes bitter in my area. But the celery-like stems don't, so I use them in vegetable soup like you might use celery. When I can harvest the leaves I usually sautee it in olive oil. Overall though, it's not my favorite either. I generally grow the "brite lites" variety more as an ornamental.
Right. The stalks can be tasty if prepared right.

SciFiAuthor

Quote from: The General on June 10, 2015, 11:18:16 PM
Thanks, it's more of a white trash backyard vibe right now, but we're working on the edible landscape part.

I shoot for that too. I figure if the apocalypse ever happens I can eat my lawn.

sydtron

Built this myself. $56. 8ft x 2ft. 18in tall.  Ive got one German Suzie tomato plant. One Roma, and One cherry tomato.

Two rows of kale two rows of romaine lettuce and a few bush beans on the end.  Going to make a second one soon for root vegetables.

jazmunda

My lime tree finally bore fruit. It's very emasculating.


SciFiAuthor

Quote from: jazmunda on June 11, 2015, 01:12:10 AM
My lime tree finally bore fruit. It's very emasculating.



I have a love-hate relationship with a potted lemon tree. The fucker drops its leaves if I water it a drop too much. I have never met a more temperamental plant. I serenely walk through my garden in the evenings with a beer, but when I get to that SOB I give it the finger.

chefist

Quote from: jazmunda on June 11, 2015, 01:12:10 AM
My lime tree finally bore fruit. It's very emasculating.



Nice! Tons of citrus here in Arizona...I need to plant a lime tree for sure...we use it like salt n pepper here on Mexican food!

chefist

Quote from: SciFiAuthor on June 11, 2015, 01:45:20 AM
I have a love-hate relationship with a potted lemon tree. The fucker drops its leaves if I water it a drop too much. I have never met a more temperamental plant. I serenely walk through my garden in the evenings with a beer, but when I get to that SOB I give it the finger.

Are you in St. Louis? Citrus love heat n outdoors for sure...

chefist

Quote from: sydtron on June 10, 2015, 11:42:04 PM
Built this myself. $56. 8ft x 2ft. 18in tall.  Ive got one German Suzie tomato plant. One Roma, and One cherry tomato.

Two rows of kale two rows of romaine lettuce and a few bush beans on the end.  Going to make a second one soon for root vegetables.

Looks great! I used plastic pallets from work....

chefist

Quote from: SciFiAuthor on June 10, 2015, 11:28:02 PM
I shoot for that too. I figure if the apocalypse ever happens I can eat my lawn.

About those tomatoes! Tomatoes really don't bloom above 90%. No blooms, no fruits...I have short spring and fall tomato season here in AZ...winters get too cold at night and summers too hot in the day....great for peppers though!

sydtron

And here it is fully populated.  I think the tomato plants are too close together. But it was our first go around here at home. 

Powered by SMFPacks Menu Editor Mod