Author TOR !!1  (Read 6165 times)

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TOR !!1
« Reply #30 on: December 30, 2013, 03:39:42 AM »
I now use bing, and I let them track the shit out of me.   I get free xbox live that way.  I love the government spying on me so much that I feed my xbox 5 kinect cameras throughout the house, on motion sensing software so they each know when to turn on depending on what room I'm in.

TOR !!1
« Reply #31 on: January 06, 2014, 01:07:18 AM »

TOR !!1
« Reply #32 on: January 06, 2014, 01:14:19 AM »

TOR !!1
« Reply #33 on: January 22, 2014, 08:39:03 AM »
:) "Kate the Bionic Uterus" is the most awesome name. Ever.  :)

LoL everything I do is awesome XDD

here watch this; You think all the info about the NSA/GCHQ program was scary? Think again. Today's revelations illustrated that the state of affairs is beyond your worst nightmare -- far beyond.  http://videosift.com/video/The-scariest-talk-about-the-NSA-as-of-yet-its-bad-people

TOR !!1
« Reply #34 on: February 09, 2014, 02:28:22 PM »
If you are using /interested in TOR then you may also like Wickr;

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wickr (the website link is at the bottom of the page)




TOR !!1
« Reply #35 on: February 09, 2014, 04:22:13 PM »
:) "Kate the Bionic Uterus" is the most awesome name. Ever.  :)

It is rather snappy.  I like. 

TOR !!1
« Reply #36 on: February 09, 2014, 04:58:09 PM »
If you ... ...

Hey Kate, do you know if there is an operating system for PC that can input signal from hardwire ISP and output ISP internet bidirectionally to normal PC that only monitors and records where signal came from and mine going to?

The vid you posted on 1/22/14 08:39 AM was a bit over my head on initial look in speed of delivery of details, not sure if designed to cause fear, certainly info Americans should know about, but I think the threats to the American Constitution need to be dealt with more directly by identifying the source on pulpits in churches, synagogues, and mosques to train the herds. At least I've never heard of any local place of worship of the US Constitution where latest technology trying to overthrow it is discussed.

TOR !!1
« Reply #37 on: February 10, 2014, 08:46:12 PM »
wait a sec here... the video was over your head yet you were able to conjure up this question? Hmm... ;) offhand the short answer is... no I don't, but let me sleep on it. 

Maybe someone else here can help you with that. The truth is your question provokes more questions and I am trying to understand why you would want to do this and in what capacity?

TOR !!1
« Reply #38 on: February 12, 2014, 07:30:20 PM »
Hey Kate, do you know if there is an operating system for PC that can input signal from hardwire ISP and output ISP internet bidirectionally to normal PC that only monitors and records where signal came from and mine going to?

I am redirecting your question to the Microsoft or Unix forums since upon re-reading I noticed that you are asking about Operating Systems.

Unfortunately, what you are describing does not make much sense to me at the moment... unless you are talking about setting up a PC as a router/server. In that case, I would suppose the Windows Server OS might be what you're looking for. I don't know what the latest version is, my last experience with Server was back when, and I'm sure it's been upgraded since. If I understand correctly... It had a variety of packet sniffing capabilities, as well as the means to spoof IP addresses and MAC addresses.

Let us know what you find out.

TOR !!1
« Reply #39 on: February 25, 2014, 02:31:43 PM »
The Inside Story of Tor, the Best Internet Anonymity Tool the Government Ever Built
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-01-23/tor-anonymity-software-vs-dot-the-national-security-agency

~Interesting quote from the article; It’s [TOR is] perhaps the most effective means of defeating the online surveillance efforts of intelligence agencies around the world, including the most sophisticated agency of them all, the NSA. That’s ironic, because Tor started as a project of the U.S. government. More than half of the Tor Project’s revenue in 2012, or $1.24 million, came from government grants, including an $876,099 award from the Department of Defense, according to financial statements available on the project’s website.

TOR !!1
« Reply #40 on: February 25, 2014, 04:04:29 PM »
Hey Kate, do you know if there is an operating system for PC that can input signal from hardwire ISP and output ISP internet bidirectionally to normal PC that only monitors and records where signal came from and mine going to?

I got a reply from the Ubuntu forums. Have you ever heard of TAILS? Tails is an acronym for “The Amnesic Incognito Live System”. Maybe this can help you out. https://tails.boum.org/

More info about it here; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Amnesic_Incognito_Live_System

TOR !!1
« Reply #41 on: March 16, 2014, 01:01:00 AM »
...[TOR is] perhaps the most effective means of defeating the online surveillance efforts of intelligence agencies around the world, including the most sophisticated agency of them all, the NSA. That’s ironic, because Tor started as a project of the U.S. government. More than half of the Tor Project’s revenue in 2012, or $1.24 million, came from government grants, including an $876,099 award from the Department of Defense, according to financial statements available on the project’s website.[/i]

Ok this surprised me.  Kate (or any Tor experts out there), do you think it's still safe to use or in other words:  Can gov't agencies plop in their own phony Tor servers and listen in?


TOR !!1
« Reply #43 on: April 24, 2014, 09:33:02 PM »
Ok this surprised me.  Kate (or any Tor experts out there), do you think it's still safe to use or in other words:  Can gov't agencies plop in their own phony Tor servers and listen in?

The government can listen and track information even if you use TOR.
http://yro.slashdot.org/story/13/12/18/047246/harvard-bomb-hoax-perpetrator-caught-despite-tor-use

Still all internet security experts will say the same thing; that it is the most secure way to surf the net. It is the best tool out there.

TOR !!1
« Reply #44 on: April 26, 2014, 12:19:52 AM »
The government can listen and track information even if you use TOR.
http://yro.slashdot.org/story/13/12/18/047246/harvard-bomb-hoax-perpetrator-caught-despite-tor-use

Still all internet security experts will say the same thing; that it is the most secure way to surf the net. It is the best tool out there.

Interesting!  It looks like they were able to just do a simple time trace that someone accessed Tor from the school's wireless network, then they got him in a room and got him to crack.  So Tor, technically, may be safe, but there are still other ways to track you down and nail you using low-tech methods if you do something to irritate the authorities enough.

TOR !!1
« Reply #45 on: June 21, 2014, 01:40:50 AM »
Recent article which touches on Tor, and other options.

One item that was new to me:

Even if you run Tor to anonymize every individual Internet application you use, your computer might still be leaking identifying info online. The NSA has even used unencrypted Windows error messages sent to Microsoft to finger users and track their identities.  Reference article


TOR !!1
« Reply #46 on: July 07, 2014, 06:11:50 PM »
Recent article which touches on Tor, and other options.

One item that was new to me:

Even if you run Tor to anonymize every individual Internet application you use, your computer might still be leaking identifying info online. The NSA has even used unencrypted Windows error messages sent to Microsoft to finger users and track their identities.  Reference article

Yes of course! TOR is only a browser. There are many other ways that your computer leaks information and they in turn open access into your system. Every program you install is essentially an access point like, Adobe, Java, EVERYTHING! Any program that you use that wants access to the internet is a security concern. Even add-ons / apps to your firefox/chrome browser or phone leak information and can be used to gain access. The entire microsoft operating system is like stopping a waterfall with a kitchen sponge. TOR is only one slice of the pizza. It alone does enough for the average person but it is not enough to protect you from the military.

Although this is;there are operating systems being built like QUBES http://qubes-os.org/trac/wiki that in conjunction with TOR will make you essentially invisible. Even to the military.



TOR !!1
« Reply #47 on: July 08, 2014, 02:33:01 AM »
Kate good to see you posting again, thought maybe you got lost in one of the Tor onion layers.    :D

TOR !!1
« Reply #48 on: July 08, 2014, 05:21:39 PM »
Kate good to see you posting again, thought maybe you got lost in one of the Tor onion layers.    :D
hahahaha The site seems a lot more fun these days ^^

TOR !!1
« Reply #49 on: July 17, 2014, 06:31:42 PM »
Funding doubled, so engineering some back doors?

In 2012, Tor nearly doubled its budget, taking in $2.2 million from
Pentagon and intel-connected grants: $876,099 came from the DoD, $353,000
from the State Department, $387,800 from IBB.

That same year, Tor lined up an unknown amount funding from the
Broadcasting Board of Governors to finance fast exit nodes.

http://pando.com/2014/07/16/tor-spooks/

_______________________________________________
Sent through the Full Disclosure mailing list
http://nmap.org/mailman/listinfo/fulldisclosure
Web Archives & RSS: http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/

Tor was originally sponsored by the US Naval Research Lab. Does this
automatically mean it's backdoored then? Could someone insert a backdoor
into open-source software? Yes. Funding sources do little to change this.
Now, who is controlling exit nodes is a different story, but that's another
can of worms.

Sent through the Full Disclosure mailing list
http://nmap.org/mailman/listinfo/fulldisclosure
Web Archives & RSS: http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/

You might find this interesting then.
The Tor Network [30c3] (with Jacob Applebaum)

The code is not the weak point, the idea that State funded operations
can co-op enough exit nodes to subvert the network and make a difference
is.

--


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TOR !!1
« Reply #50 on: July 17, 2014, 11:05:40 PM »
... The code is not the weak point, the idea that State funded operations
can co-op enough exit nodes to subvert the network and make a difference
is.

This seems like a very reasonable concern, except woundn't your ip still be hidden via the other 2 nodes in the circuit?  What it does seem like it could do is open the exit node traffic to snooping if you sent other identifying info through.

TOR !!1
« Reply #51 on: July 18, 2014, 09:13:50 AM »
http://pando.com/2014/07/16/tor-spooks/
Quote
But the German exposé  showed Tor providing the opposite of anonymity: it singled out users for total NSA surveillance, potentially sucking up and recording everything they did online.
...
In 2013, the Washington Post revealed that the NSA had figured out various ways of unmasking and penetrating the anonymity of the Tor Network.
Quote
Since 2006, according to a 49-page research paper titled simply “Tor,” the agency has worked on several methods that, if successful, would allow the NSA to uncloak anonymous traffic on a “wide scale” — effectively by watching communications as they enter and exit the Tor system, rather than trying to follow them inside. One type of attack, for example, would identify users by minute differences in the clock times on their computers.


Maybe the government figures that if you're looking to do something sketchy, you'll be attracted to this type of project. So why not sponsor one so they can watch you in a place you're less likely to expect it?

Bastards.

TOR !!1
« Reply #52 on: September 12, 2014, 01:34:24 PM »
The FBI has recently released details on how the Silk Road black market was taken down.

While the transactions were secured by the Tor network, the Silk Road provided a misconfigured CAPTCHA that used elements from the open Internet. FBI investigators noticed this and, from there, were able to trace back to the main server. Some security experts remain skeptical of the technique described but cannot disprove it.

The article also goes on to explain how the TOR network works for those of you who don't know.

TOR still remains the safest way to roam web.

http://krebsonsecurity.com/2014/09/dread-pirate-sunk-by-leaky-captcha/

TOR !!1
« Reply #53 on: September 12, 2014, 11:44:21 PM »
...While the transactions were secured by the Tor network, the Silk Road provided a misconfigured CAPTCHA that used elements from the open Internet. ...

Sounds like Tor is still pretty good as long as you don't have this kind of side-leakage.  Of course, unless your up on all the latest third-party protocols etc. you might get tracked anyway.  As I remember that earlier story was from Microsoft error messages being sent out, which id'd your ip.

Sounds like the only true anonymity is to fly to a foreign country on a fake passport, put on a good disguise, find a web cafe far from any street cameras, ... then use Tor.   ;D

TOR !!1
« Reply #54 on: September 13, 2014, 12:19:33 AM »
http://pando.com/2014/07/16/tor-spooks/


Maybe the government figures that if you're looking to do something sketchy, you'll be attracted to this type of project. So why not sponsor one so they can watch you in a place you're less likely to expect it?

Bastards.

Is 'sketchy' the modern euphimism for publishing videos and photos of children being raped; trading in military spec weapons and class A narchotics, and a means for those who wouldn't think twice about beheading you and your family for fun to keep in touch?

I'm not defending snooping per se, but some of those who really need desposing of with prejudice should be snooped on. Unfortunately others get caught in the shit storm too.

TOR !!1
« Reply #55 on: September 14, 2014, 10:29:02 AM »
Is 'sketchy' the modern euphimism for publishing videos and photos of children being raped; trading in military spec weapons and class A narchotics, and a means for those who wouldn't think twice about beheading you and your family for fun to keep in touch?

I'm not defending snooping per se, but some of those who really need desposing of with prejudice should be snooped on. Unfortunately others get caught in the shit storm too.

Well that is the quagmire we find ourselves in eh? The US had a huge advantage over the rest of the world in that it could tap into anything. The real question here is not what the criminals were doing (because we all know that already) it is what were the "good guys" doing with their advantage? And we are learning that they were doing many illegal things like; listening and copying trademark and private information from corporations overseas. It is now being said that this information was given to US companies so that they could have a financial advantage and so on and so on...

That's the thing, if it was just to go after the  scum bag criminals no one who really care but,.. the military, alphabet agencies and federal and local police have been illegally sharing information without warrants and due process and are using this power against their own regular citizens. WTF... this is what the Soviet Union and the eastern block used to do! Is that the future you want for your children.

Sure Edward  Snowden fucked the US but in my opinion they had it coming to them because they abused the power and didn't use it appropriately. They only have themselves to blame. In the end the US will never stop and I think they have been doing this since the web first came online. If they use it to stop ISIS and child porn then I applaud their efforts but if it is used for petty crime against their own citizens then the whole thing has to be scrapped. The United States of America (and all western countries for that matter) can not be in the business of spying on their own citizens period.

TOR !!1
« Reply #56 on: September 14, 2014, 10:33:28 AM »
Sounds like Tor is still pretty good as long as you don't have this kind of side-leakage.  Of course, unless your up on all the latest third-party protocols etc. you might get tracked anyway.  As I remember that earlier story was from Microsoft error messages being sent out, which id'd your ip.

Sounds like the only true anonymity is to fly to a foreign country on a fake passport, put on a good disguise, find a web cafe far from any street cameras, ... then use Tor.   ;D

I think today TOR is only as good as the operating system it is being run on.