Author Windows 10  (Read 31070 times)

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Re: Windows 10
« Reply #120 on: April 16, 2016, 01:18:58 AM »
I researched all updates after the Win10 stuff hit the pavement, and avoided the upgrade nag updates.  But when Microsoft smuggled in a Win10 upgrade launcher into a security update, with NO mention about it in the documentation, that was it for me.  I've turned off updates completely.  I now feel like I have more to fear from MS than I do from hackers.

I'll use Win7 until my hardware breaks down and I can't use it anymore.  Then I'll use Linux exclusively.  I will never use Win10/Windows service.  Although I will give credit to MS for learning from Google and Facebook that most people will eagerly take free shit because they are either too stupid to understand that their privacy is being raped in return, or too ignorant to care.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #121 on: April 16, 2016, 03:19:53 AM »
It appears that I first have to do an upgrade of my Win7 OEM install to Win10 - which will turn my Win7 key into a working Win10 license. It looks like the only way to get it. So I'll have to do an upgrade and then wipe the drive and do a clean install.

http://www.redmondpie.com/how-to-clean-install-windows-10-on-your-pc-the-right-way-guide

Would definitely like to get a new drive to put it on as well, rather than this old drive I'm using.

nope... you can use your windows 7 product key during a fresh install of win10.  it'll accept that key as long as you're using the latest windows10 install media.  microsoft has finally made something simple.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #122 on: April 16, 2016, 03:22:05 AM »
IMHO, XP was the best OS M$ put out. 2000 comes in a close second only because it doesn't handle NTFS.

i love xp as well.  it doesn't do a good job managing multiple users, though.  my only big complaint.


Re: Windows 10
« Reply #123 on: April 16, 2016, 03:42:09 AM »
...Although I will give credit to MS for learning from Google and Facebook that most people will eagerly take free shit because they are either too stupid to understand that their privacy is being raped in return, or too ignorant to care.
Bingo!

I'm looking at getting my mother one of those "mini computer's on a stick."  There is an Intel one with Windows 10 loaded, and there are the Linux versions (and the Raspberry Pi's...)

She is not much of a computer person and wants to check emails, play solitaire (no, I'm not joking) and would like to surf the net (I have 25 tabs open... she will visit one or two sites a day.)

While I am trying not to let my hatred of MS cloud my recommendation, I want her to have the easiest OS possible for her.  While she is not completely computer illiterate and has done budgets in excel and was a manager with the minimal computer skills necessary for the job, I have to do simple things like connect her Iphone to her email server or her computer to her wireless...

Like you said, MS has learned well.  Make a simple product, make it easy to use, promise no privacy and harvest data... Well done on their part (to the point where I am actually considering a windows 10 device for her.) I understand the privacy concerns, she really does not care (like my sister who knows about it but uses FB for business and has expanded it to everything in her personal life as well.) :-\

Drives me nuts- but there are lots of people for MS to market their product to.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #124 on: April 16, 2016, 04:19:44 AM »
Bingo!

I'm looking at getting my mother one of those "mini computer's on a stick."  There is an Intel one with Windows 10 loaded, and there are the Linux versions (and the Raspberry Pi's...)

She is not much of a computer person and wants to check emails, play solitaire (no, I'm not joking) and would like to surf the net (I have 25 tabs open... she will visit one or two sites a day.)

While I am trying not to let my hatred of MS cloud my recommendation, I want her to have the easiest OS possible for her.  While she is not completely computer illiterate and has done budgets in excel and was a manager with the minimal computer skills necessary for the job, I have to do simple things like connect her Iphone to her email server or her computer to her wireless...

Like you said, MS has learned well.  Make a simple product, make it easy to use, promise no privacy and harvest data... Well done on their part (to the point where I am actually considering a windows 10 device for her.) I understand the privacy concerns, she really does not care (like my sister who knows about it but uses FB for business and has expanded it to everything in her personal life as well.) :-\

Drives me nuts- but there are lots of people for MS to market their product to.

There are numerous Linux distros that work off of live cds or DVDs.  Linux Mint is known for being similar to Windows in its layout and a good bridge to learning Linux.

I just installed Win 7 on a usb drive this week.  The drive is tiny, a 32gb drive the size of my thumbnail.  I can plug it into any Windows computer, anywhere, that allows booting from a usb drive and boot into my own desktop.  It's possible to do this with Win 8 and even win 10.  Win 8 has an advantage because it supports USB 3.0.  Win 7 off of a USB drive is slow, relative to an embedded drive.

It's also possible to install it (with better performance) on an external drive.  You could find a cheap external HDD (even 50 gb would be enough for your purposes), install win 7, and set up your bios boot priority such that Mom's drive boots if it is plugged in, else your internal drive boots.

There's lots of options out there to do what you want.  I'm sure you will find something that fits quite well if you research it. 

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #125 on: April 16, 2016, 05:15:56 AM »
There are numerous Linux distros that work off of live cds or DVDs.  Linux Mint is known for being similar to Windows in its layout and a good bridge to learning Linux.

I just installed Win 7 on a usb drive this week.  The drive is tiny, a 32gb drive the size of my thumbnail.  I can plug it into any Windows computer, anywhere, that allows booting from a usb drive and boot into my own desktop.  It's possible to do this with Win 8 and even win 10.  Win 8 has an advantage because it supports USB 3.0.  Win 7 off of a USB drive is slow, relative to an embedded drive.

It's also possible to install it (with better performance) on an external drive.  You could find a cheap external HDD (even 50 gb would be enough for your purposes), install win 7, and set up your bios boot priority such that Mom's drive boots if it is plugged in, else your internal drive boots.

There's lots of options out there to do what you want.  I'm sure you will find something that fits quite well if you research it.
Thanks... I was actually starting to look at the sticks that plug into the HDMI on a television.  She does not need much memory, does not care about speed, will not be watching videos or doing anything home theater related and they are around $120 - $150 for the windows version (a little less for other OS.)  She has a wireless mouse and that just leaves a keyboard to get her up and running (no monitor and it is portable where she can take it with her.)

She is also starting to look at tablets- but I don't think she would be happy doing emails or even playing solitaire on a small screen.  I kind of figure if the stick does not work out I would just buy it as a novelty for myself and keep looking for a better solution for her.  It just seems like they are cheap.  While I know it would not work for most people, I think for her needs a 386 would be just fine (with a 56K modem.) :o

Well, the search has just begun.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #126 on: April 16, 2016, 07:39:11 AM »
nope... you can use your windows 7 product key during a fresh install of win10.  it'll accept that key as long as you're using the latest windows10 install media.  microsoft has finally made something simple.

I'll give that a shot, thanks.

Windows 10: Don't go there!
« Reply #127 on: April 22, 2016, 02:54:17 AM »
I'm putting this here because of Mr. Bell's remarks last year about Window's incessant & increasing nagging to upgrade to version 10.  I tried it, then reverted to 8.1 after 3 weeks.

Windows 10 may be decent to run the right software on, but with a minimal Windows installation using the default Web browser, it's clearly inferior.  Although it advertises compatibility settings, Windows 10 doesn't run a version of Internet Explorer that you'd think would be recent enough to work even with Microsoft's notorious lack of backward compatibility.  The browser that comes with Windows 10 is Edge.  You would think it was a demo version, it's so weak.  You can't simply download to local disk a page you're looking at with it.  When downloading is an option provided by a link, Edge doesn't query you as to which directory to put the file into.  Edge has hardly anything in the way of settings the user can adjust.  When you open a new window or tab of it, it doesn't provide a direct URL input line, only the search line.

Windows 10 comes with no dedicated help feature, substituting Cortana, which is just another Internet search engine.  "Ask me anything," and I'll get you to the same places you could've searched yourself.

As I was on the point of reverting (the option to do which is granted for a month), I was pushed over when either Edge or something else started jamming local disc read-write traffic, as reported by Task Manager, hanging the system for ~20 mins. at a time.  Cortana leads to other users complaining of the same.

Whatever gains were to be had by upgrading to Win 10 were inapparent to me, while its faults (both design & implement'n) were obvious.

Re: Windows 10: Don't go there!
« Reply #128 on: April 22, 2016, 04:32:17 AM »
There's another Windows 10 thread. A lot of people seem to like 10. Though the upgrade or free version might be limited, like Windows 7 Home (or what have you) was. Win7 has a version where you can't even change the desktop wallpaper.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #129 on: April 22, 2016, 02:09:14 PM »
And I contributed to thread prolifer'n by starting one in "All Things Art Bell" because he'd brought it up on his show.  I didn't even know BellGab had a "Technology" section (or I'd've put it here), but looks like the moderator moved it here, thanks.

Anyway, I forgot to mention Edge's really awful cache invalid'n.  On pages that update remotely, it drags back old data quickly even if you try to follow manually.  How could they have fucked it up this badly if MSIE didn't have that fault?  IE even let you choose a few settings for handling of cached data.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #130 on: April 22, 2016, 02:13:53 PM »
I am increasingly disliking the way Microsoft thinks, they are turning our software more and more towards the direction of being a subscription or 'rentware'.
Like SAS?

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #131 on: April 22, 2016, 02:36:22 PM »
I prefer dual-boot, Linux & Windows, but I didn't do that with this laptop because:

(1) technically I don't own it;
(2) it came new with Windows 8.1 pre-installed and no installation media;
(3) it came w/o a removable disc drive, so couldn't reinstall Windows from disc even if I had the media; and
(4) the drive partition structure looked unfamiliar.

#4 turned out to be my misperception, it was actually the same as I'd dealt with previously, but meanwhile I'd chickened out & just kept using the Windows it came with, afraid of messing up property that'd been bought for me to use primarily for the needs of a small organiz'n.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #132 on: April 22, 2016, 03:14:33 PM »
I researched all updates after the Win10 stuff hit the pavement, and avoided the upgrade nag updates.  But when Microsoft smuggled in a Win10 upgrade launcher into a security update, with NO mention about it in the documentation, that was it for me.  I've turned off updates completely.  I now feel like I have more to fear from MS than I do from hackers.

I'll use Win7 until my hardware breaks down and I can't use it anymore.  Then I'll use Linux exclusively.  I will never use Win10/Windows service.  Although I will give credit to MS for learning from Google and Facebook that most people will eagerly take free shit because they are either too stupid to understand that their privacy is being raped in return, or too ignorant to care.

I just noticed this in my laptop as well and I'm pissed off as hell. I don't want my privacy invaded by the likes of Microsoft or anyone else. When my Toshiba went belly up, I looked for Win 7 which was no easy task last year, and now Microsoft installed a damned Trojan horse onto my drive during an update. It's worse than the day I woke to find U2's unwanted album on my phone, since that's only an assault on my autonomy while this is a full scale assault on my autonomy and privacy with no shamefaced apology and means to take it off. I hate Microsoft with a passion.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #133 on: April 22, 2016, 05:27:48 PM »
Can you install other browsers in Windows 10 like IE and Firefox?

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #134 on: April 22, 2016, 05:35:13 PM »
I just noticed this in my laptop as well and I'm pissed off as hell. I don't want my privacy invaded by the likes of Microsoft or anyone else. When my Toshiba went belly up, I looked for Win 7 which was no easy task last year, and now Microsoft installed a damned Trojan horse onto my drive during an update. It's worse than the day I woke to find U2's unwanted album on my phone, since that's only an assault on my autonomy while this is a full scale assault on my autonomy and privacy with no shamefaced apology and means to take it off. I hate Microsoft with a passion.
Same here. Microsoft, a pack of soulless, immoral pagans. Bastards.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #135 on: April 22, 2016, 05:40:42 PM »
Can you install other browsers in Windows 10 like IE and Firefox?

I am not sure about I.E. (Because of Edge) but Chrome and Friefox work fine.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #136 on: April 22, 2016, 05:43:46 PM »
I prefer dual-boot, Linux & Windows...

I have tried this multiple times and I always end up ditching it.  It's like trying to keep two different realities going side-by-side.  I just want a single, good OS per machine.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #137 on: April 22, 2016, 05:45:37 PM »
I have tried this multiple times and I always end up ditching it.  It's like trying to keep two different realities going side-by-side.  I just want a single, good OS per machine.

Agreed. It's pointless.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #138 on: April 22, 2016, 08:50:44 PM »
I am not sure about I.E. (Because of Edge) but Chrome and Friefox work fine.

I found this info page, IE11 is built-in to Windows 10, just hidden until you do this:
http://www.windowscentral.com/how-find-internet-explorer-windows-10-if-you-really-need-it

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #139 on: April 22, 2016, 10:26:42 PM »
Agreed. It's pointless.
No, there's definitely been a point to my configuring dual-boot Linux + Windows.  It's always been because I'd experienced, or anticipated, difficulty running at least some bit of software or hardware in one OS, and at least some other in the other.  I'm sure there were other ways I could've eventually overcome those problems within one OS even using scrounged or cheap components, but dual-boot was a decent expedient.

If everything you think you'll want to run works in one OS, then of course there's no advantage being able to boot into another.  If you ever need a rescue boot, it doesn't need to be from a different OS, and having another partition on your fixed disc just for rescue purposes seems silly even if theoretically it could be done.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #140 on: April 22, 2016, 10:32:54 PM »
I found this info page, IE11 is built-in to Windows 10, just hidden until you do this:
http://www.windowscentral.com/how-find-internet-explorer-windows-10-if-you-really-need-it
It wasn't deeply hidden from me, but even after I ran a compatibility utility (or compatibility-checking utility, it wasn't clear which) offered by Win 10, IE11 bombed out after briefly flashing a window on the screen, without even so much as an ab-end error message.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #141 on: April 22, 2016, 11:05:10 PM »
I have tried this multiple times and I always end up ditching it.  It's like trying to keep two different realities going side-by-side.  I just want a single, good OS per machine.

It makes sense if you prefer Linux, but need Windows for gaming. But just the way fonts are rendered in different OSes makes switching between them annoying and an eye strain. Especially is web browsers.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #142 on: April 22, 2016, 11:52:12 PM »
No, there's definitely been a point to my configuring dual-boot Linux + Windows.

i'm not saying it's pointless for you.  i'm saying it's pointless for me.

Re: Windows 10: Don't go there!
« Reply #143 on: April 22, 2016, 11:57:28 PM »
I'm putting this here because of Mr. Bell's remarks last year about Window's incessant & increasing nagging to upgrade to version 10.  I tried it, then reverted to 8.1 after 3 weeks.

Windows 10 may be decent to run the right software on, but with a minimal Windows installation using the default Web browser, it's clearly inferior.  Although it advertises compatibility settings, Windows 10 doesn't run a version of Internet Explorer that you'd think would be recent enough to work even with Microsoft's notorious lack of backward compatibility.  The browser that comes with Windows 10 is Edge.  You would think it was a demo version, it's so weak.  You can't simply download to local disk a page you're looking at with it.  When downloading is an option provided by a link, Edge doesn't query you as to which directory to put the file into.  Edge has hardly anything in the way of settings the user can adjust.  When you open a new window or tab of it, it doesn't provide a direct URL input line, only the search line.

Windows 10 comes with no dedicated help feature, substituting Cortana, which is just another Internet search engine.  "Ask me anything," and I'll get you to the same places you could've searched yourself.

As I was on the point of reverting (the option to do which is granted for a month), I was pushed over when either Edge or something else started jamming local disc read-write traffic, as reported by Task Manager, hanging the system for ~20 mins. at a time.  Cortana leads to other users complaining of the same.

Whatever gains were to be had by upgrading to Win 10 were inapparent to me, while its faults (both design & implement'n) were obvious.

On the plus side, Microsoft now has information on how diligently you change your underwear over the course of 3 weeks.  And so much more.

Re: Windows 10: Don't go there!
« Reply #144 on: April 23, 2016, 01:03:03 AM »
On the plus side, Microsoft now has information on how diligently you change your underwear over the course of 3 weeks.  And so much more.

But they only use it to enhance your life.

Re: Windows 10: Don't go there!
« Reply #145 on: April 24, 2016, 10:18:48 AM »
But they only use it to enhance your life.
So that's why the paperclip was babbling "looks like you're trying to change your underwear."

But how is that connected to me waking up with marker stains under my nose?

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #146 on: May 04, 2016, 04:45:59 AM »
FUCK YOU, microsoft!

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #147 on: May 04, 2016, 05:02:16 AM »
FUCK YOU, microsoft!

Looks like you are on the Second Stage of grief.  Good luck in your journey.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #148 on: May 04, 2016, 05:03:52 AM »
Looks like you are on the Second Stage of grief.  Good luck in your journey.

I can choose to grieve now or sometime over the next few days.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #149 on: May 04, 2016, 08:46:44 AM »
FUCK YOU, microsoft!
Is there any way to stop these incessant 10 reminders from the MS MF's, before they just ram it down my processor?