Author Windows 10  (Read 31060 times)

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Windows 10
« on: July 29, 2015, 05:22:44 PM »
I don't plan to upgrade for several months, but I'd love to hear comments - good or bad - from earlier adopters.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2015, 05:29:19 PM »
Well, I've been using the technical preview for months and months, so I was very familiar with it already.  I installed the Official Release from the provided media creation/installation tool, and its running like a top on two of my computers with no problems.  Took a total of two hours to download the installation tool AND install the OS.

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10

I also have the usb made from the media creation tool for backup/reinstall, should I ever need to use it.  I would recommend making sure you have a factory install backup, just in case you don't like windows 10, or have a problem with it, and want to go back to Windows 8.1, 8, or 7.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2015, 07:10:21 PM »
How's compatibility? My worry is that I have some vendor-specific Win7 programs for work that *mostly* work with Win8 (crash about 5% of the time). I'm kind of waiting for the all-clear from these companies before I take the plunge.


Re: Windows 10
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2015, 07:22:43 PM »
How's compatibility? My worry is that I have some vendor-specific Win7 programs for work that *mostly* work with Win8 (crash about 5% of the time). I'm kind of waiting for the all-clear from these companies before I take the plunge.

I don't know what programs you have, but all my programs are working with no crashes. Netflix is even better IMO, I use Gimp and VLC player, Audacity and Google Chrome. I had issues with my realtek speakers with the preview, but all seems to be running nice and snappy. The app windows are sizable, and snapable to fit the screen side by side, and it has multiple desktop capabilities.  Seems as though all the compatability issues were taken care of during install.  I haven't had to set anything to compatibility settings so far.  I don't blame you for wanting to wait. I would wait too if I wasn't already familiar with it.  If you DO take the plunge, I hope you make sure you have a factory install backup.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2015, 07:31:53 PM »
HTG has a nice tutorial on how to backup one's PC before upgrading... http://www.howtogeek.com/223139/how-to-create-an-image-of-your-pc-before-upgrading-to-windows-10/

I would certainly do that before taking a shot on Win10. There is supposedly a feature in there which allows you to roll back to 7/8 if you're not into it, but it only holds onto the recovery files for 30 days before they get auto-deleted.

My programs in question are proprietary programming utilities from Crestron and my bowling league utility Perfect Secretary. Much of a reason to run a Windows partition? Probably not. But the former works 95% of the time and the latter works all the time, and I don't feel like screwing with virtual machines or emulation.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2015, 07:38:32 PM »
HTG has a nice tutorial on how to backup one's PC before upgrading... http://www.howtogeek.com/223139/how-to-create-an-image-of-your-pc-before-upgrading-to-windows-10/

I would certainly do that before taking a shot on Win10. There is supposedly a feature in there which allows you to roll back to 7/8 if you're not into it, but it only holds onto the recovery files for 30 days before they get auto-deleted.

My programs in question are proprietary programming utilities from Crestron and my bowling league utility Perfect Secretary. Much of a reason to run a Windows partition? Probably not. But the former works 95% of the time and the latter works all the time, and I don't feel like screwing with virtual machines or emulation.

That will come in handy for lots of people I'm sure!  Even so, upgrading to Windows 10, and then finding you want to restore back, takes a big chunk out of your online time, unless you have more than one computer.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2015, 07:40:56 PM »
I do!  :)

But yeah, it's more of a safeguard than anything.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2015, 07:43:00 PM »
I do!  :)

But yeah, it's more of a safeguard than anything.

Hopefully someone will post that uses your programs. I try to always have two computers, so I have one to use if the other fails lol's

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2015, 07:50:46 PM »
Will Microsoft eventually force everyone to upgrade to Windows 10? 

I always enjoyed my XP-Professional the best and hung on to it until the end, when forced to do 7.  Laptop already had 7 but my desktop stayed XP until the end of support.


Re: Windows 10
« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2015, 07:51:26 PM »
Will Microsoft eventually force everyone to upgrade to Windows 10? 

I always enjoyed my XP-Professional the best and hung on to it until the end, when forced to do 7.  Laptop already had 7 but my desktop stayed XP until the end of support.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2015, 07:54:06 PM »
Will Microsoft eventually force everyone to upgrade to Windows 10? 

I always enjoyed my XP-Professional the best and hung on to it until the end, when forced to do 7.  Laptop already had 7 but my desktop stayed XP until the end of support.
Its my understanding you can hide the update when you see it.  Microsoft seems to change its mind every now and then. So I can't promise they will never force it on everyone.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2015, 07:19:16 AM »
If you're getting that annoying little popup that offers Windows 10, that's actually part of a Windows Update that Microsoft snuck in.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3035583

You can actually disable that (search for "KB3035583") but it shouldn't force you to do anything, for the near future.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #12 on: July 30, 2015, 08:02:08 AM »
while most of it is no worse than apple or android ,theres this:
"We will access, disclose and preserve personal data, including your content (such as the content of your emails, other private communications or files in private folders), when we have a good faith belief that doing so is necessary to”, for example, “protect their customers” or “enforce the terms governing
the use of the services”

in addition if you encrypt your hard drive(s) with bitlocker, the bitlocker key is uploaded to your (new) onedrive account.thus microsoft has access to that key, which would essentially make it worthless (someone else has the key, it could be accessed , then given to another entity , potentially without your permission, also it could be gained by some random cracker). an encryption key should be stored offsite on a physical medium in a secure location with your backups. not online where anyone with internet access could potentially gain access to it.
for the home user its not so bad, but any businesses should not have that key stored online, and i believe its a violation of security protocol if your a govt agency or contractor.

/*edit*/
adding url: https://edri.org/microsofts-new-small-print-how-your-personal-data-abused/

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #13 on: July 30, 2015, 08:10:49 AM »
Isn't it ironic how people claim to be protecting privacy... by taking it away?

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #14 on: July 30, 2015, 08:28:13 AM »
Isn't it ironic how people claim to be protecting privacy... by taking it away?
all your data r belong to $micro$oft?

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #15 on: July 30, 2015, 10:10:36 PM »

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #16 on: July 30, 2015, 10:46:10 PM »
windohs error messages :

sumtheens happeneen
http://www.techworm.net/2015/07/windows-10-something-happened-error-message-and-how-to-fix-it.html
I'm all about the hammer and chisel.  this techy stuff gives me a headache.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #17 on: July 31, 2015, 03:34:48 AM »
windohs error messages :

sumtheens happeneen

ahmazeen

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #18 on: July 31, 2015, 09:32:43 AM »
according to this article, you have to have onedrive whether you want it or not
http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/windows-10-review-cloud-services/

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #19 on: July 31, 2015, 09:36:02 AM »
This article says Windows 10 spies on almost everything you do and reports it to Microsoft, but there are ways to opt out
http://news.yahoo.com/windows-10-spying-almost-everything-opt-130502898.html

Unix is looking better and better.  If I could only figure out how to run Cakewalk Sonar in WINE.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #20 on: July 31, 2015, 09:36:27 AM »
according to this article, you have to have onedrive whether you want it or not
http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/windows-10-review-cloud-services/

If you click on the little cloud, and click on settings, you can select if you want it to start automatically of not, and also can click what folders you want to share with it, or not, in the choose folders tab next to settings.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #21 on: July 31, 2015, 09:38:54 AM »
I can't remember where I read it, otherwise I would post a link, but I read somewhere that windows has had this back door since Windows 98.  That doesn't make it RIGHT in my opinion, but it is what it is.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #22 on: July 31, 2015, 09:42:44 AM »
I can't remember where I read it, otherwise I would post a link, but I read somewhere that windows has had this back door since Windows 98.  That doesn't make it RIGHT in my opinion, but it is what it is.
which backdoor is this?

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #23 on: July 31, 2015, 09:44:05 AM »
which backdoor is this?

The one that collects all your information and saves it in a monster computer on Pluto lol's

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #24 on: July 31, 2015, 09:45:18 AM »
I remember when Windows 98 came out, about the same time as Pentium 3, that there rumors of a backdoor into everything that the government could exploit.  It was never clear whether it was part of the OS or the chip.

As for onedrive, or anything cloud, I work on copyrighted materials and sensitive legal documents for clients. I don't want any of this on any cloud anywhere.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #25 on: July 31, 2015, 09:49:36 AM »
I remember when Windows 98 came out, about the same time as Pentium 3, that there rumors of a backdoor into everything that the government could exploit.  It was never clear whether it was part of the OS or the chip.

Yeah, one can not really know anything for sure unless we were there doing the building of the computers and the OS's.  But I think they been a'watchin for a long time.  I don't honestly think there is anything these days that is spyware safe.  I think it's probably been everywhere for a LONG time.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #26 on: August 01, 2015, 11:25:32 PM »
just finished an install of windows 10 through the update notification. the machine is a Dell 755 MT desktop that i finished cleaning up and putting a fresh install of windows 7 pro 64bit. the Dell has a 2.33ghz cpu, 4gig ddr2 ram and a vid add-on card.
when i put win7 on it, i was surprised at how well it ran. now with win10 on it i think it runs just as well if not better. i've done only a little configuration of the settings. i like what i see so far including the app tiles on the start menu. the only program i had added to win7 prior to the update to win10 was firefox. after the install of win10, firefox is still there and working fine.
some may think it odd to run an old Dell with win7, but it was a free computer that i picked up and everything that i added was stuff i had around. free is good...  8)

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #27 on: August 02, 2015, 10:04:53 AM »
Wouldn't touch Windows 10 with a ten foot pole. I've barely got comfortable with 7, as its not heaven.  Seriously, I am increasingly disliking the way Microsoft thinks, they are turning our software more and more towards the direction of being a subscription or 'rentware'. And thats not even addressing the exploit issues or the fery foreign look and feel which I will spend days getting under control if I were to get it.  There is hope though, its called ReactOS - a true open-source Windows binary clone being developed.

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #28 on: August 02, 2015, 11:38:50 AM »
heres how to disable , set to notify , or automaitcally download windows updates:
hit windows key +r -opens the run dialog
type in gpedit.msc -this opens the group policy editor
click on computer configuration
click administrative templates
click windows components
click windows update
path is : Computer Configuration/Administrative Templates/Windows Components/Windows Update
click on configure automatic updates
click on edit policy

click the disable radio button
click apply then ok
taken from here

Re: Windows 10
« Reply #29 on: August 03, 2015, 07:01:55 AM »
the free software foundations statement on windows 10: http://www.fsf.org/news/the-fsfs-statement-on-windows-10