Author Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club  (Read 68297 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #750 on: March 29, 2017, 05:44:10 PM »
The OMNI Interviews (1984) edited by Pamela Weintraub

Includes: Richard Leakey, Hans Bethe, E.O. Wilson, Francis Crick, Gerard K. O'Neill, B.F. Skinner, Roger Sperry, Jonas Salk, John Lilly, and eleven more.


Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #751 on: March 29, 2017, 06:06:17 PM »
The OMNI Interviews (1984) edited by Pamela Weintraub

Includes: Richard Leakey, Hans Bethe, E.O. Wilson, Francis Crick, Gerard K. O'Neill, B.F. Skinner, Roger Sperry, Jonas Salk, John Lilly, and eleven more.



I loved Omni mag as a kid. It was like a magazine version of C2C before it ever existed. ;)

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #752 on: March 29, 2017, 07:00:13 PM »
I loved Omni mag as a kid. It was like a magazine version of C2C before it ever existed. ;)

Such a great publication.  I wish I had all my old back issues.  For a brief time they were released onto archive.org's site, but were later pulled.  Had i know I'd have grabbed them all.  I love how it was a mix of hard science, fringe science, and pure sci-fi.  Plus it had some really cool art.  I actually entered a few of their puzzle contests, thinking myself rather clever for a kid, but never won. 


Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #753 on: March 29, 2017, 07:18:01 PM »
Such a great publication.  I wish I had all my old back issues.  For a brief time they were released onto archive.org's site, but were later pulled.  Had i know I'd have grabbed them all.  I love how it was a mix of hard science, fringe science, and pure sci-fi.  Plus it had some really cool art.  I actually entered a few of their puzzle contests, thinking myself rather clever for a kid, but never won.

https://thepiratebay.org/torrent/7790414/OMNI_Magazine_1978--1995
https://thepiratebay.org/torrent/7766357/Omni_Magazine_(the_complete_run)

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #754 on: March 30, 2017, 01:17:00 AM »
Such a great publication.  I wish I had all my old back issues.  For a brief time they were released onto archive.org's site, but were later pulled.  Had i know I'd have grabbed them all.  I love how it was a mix of hard science, fringe science, and pure sci-fi.  Plus it had some really cool art.  I actually entered a few of their puzzle contests, thinking myself rather clever for a kid, but never won.

I remember when that happened.

https://thepiratebay.org/torrent/7790414/OMNI_Magazine_1978--1995
https://thepiratebay.org/torrent/7766357/Omni_Magazine_(the_complete_run)

You are a gentleman and a scholar, sir.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #755 on: April 05, 2017, 08:38:23 PM »
But I think that as a result of our observations we are beginning to think of life as a property that is more and more common in the universe.  In everything there is a certain measure of life.  - Cyril Ponnamperuma

from The OMNI Interviews (1984) edited by Pamela Weintraub

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #756 on: April 05, 2017, 11:40:10 PM »
But I think that as a result of our observations we are beginning to think of life as a property that is more and more common in the universe.  In everything there is a certain measure of life.  - Cyril Ponnamperuma

from The OMNI Interviews (1984) edited by Pamela Weintraub

I've often believed this myself.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animism

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #757 on: April 06, 2017, 12:04:39 AM »
There's always the possibility that we will be invaded.*  We'd like to know for scientific reasons, but there might also be reasons of defense.  I would be surprised if it were totally beneficial or benign, whatever its nature.  - Francis Crick

from The OMNI Interviews (1984) edited by Pamela Weintraub

*by extraterrestrial beings

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #758 on: April 06, 2017, 12:13:38 PM »
I was very careful in the selection of my ancestors. - Ernst Mayr

from The OMNI Interviews (1984) edited by Pamela Weintraub

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #759 on: April 06, 2017, 01:25:50 PM »
I think those studies show not so much the great wisdom of the chimpanzee, but, rather, the great stupidity of man.  We should have realized long ago that we weren't so special.  I mean, it doesn't take a scientist to realize that a chimpanzee or a dog is an intelligent animal.  Instead, it takes a bigoted human to suggest that it's not.  - Richard Leakey

from The OMNI Interviews (1984) edited by Pamela Weintraub

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #760 on: April 06, 2017, 03:31:01 PM »
Sometimes, big cats become man-eaters because they've been injured and can't hunt effectively.  They've become desperate.  But in Tanzania we traced the development of a man-eater, a young male lion that I watched grow up from a cub.  He apparently saw drunks walking home at night down the village road, and he started picking them off.  The unsteady walk of the drunks perhaps triggered the attacks.  When a lion hunts he will pinpoint a sick animal stumbling, and he'll go after it.  There's no easier prey in the world than man, if he doesn't have a gun. - George Schaller

from The OMNI Interviews (1984) edited by Pamela Weintraub

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #761 on: April 06, 2017, 05:13:14 PM »
Over time, I've discovered that I'm not really in control of my own mind.  Often, I merely observe it and its machinations.  The analytic part of my mind -- the observer -- and the analogic part of my mind -- the accumulator of experience -- are in constant dialogue, challenging and testing the fit of concepts and formulations.  - Jonas Salk

from The OMNI Interviews (1984) edited by Pamela Weintraub

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #762 on: April 06, 2017, 06:39:38 PM »
Of course men and women have entirely different attitudes toward sex, and those attitudes are due to physiological differences in the brain.  Men derive an evolutionary advantage from spreading their seed as much as possible.  Women, on the other hand, need to choose a mate who will stay around and take care of them and their offspring.  So I'd expect to find a part of the female brain that is devoted to making that kind of choice.  Women are programmed to fall in love with whomever they make love with, no matter how ludicrous the person.  - Candace Pert

from The OMNI Interviews (1984) edited by Pamela Weintraub

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #763 on: April 06, 2017, 09:50:40 PM »
That's the problem with marriage.  You just get more jaded in all your tastes; you've got to have more refinement.  Less and less is novel.  Or, let's say, the novelty is more and more subtle, because you've got a larger and larger store of familiarity against which to match incoming impressions.  - Karl Pribram

from The OMNI Interviews (1984) edited by Pamela Weintraub

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #764 on: April 06, 2017, 10:03:03 PM »
Omni magazine.  I hadn't thought about that magnificent publication in awhile.  It is missed.  Gloriously, but sadly, missed.


Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #765 on: April 07, 2017, 01:58:28 AM »
I never could make out what Timothy Leary really intended.  I had the feeling he was na´ve: he was so enthusiastic about LSD that he wanted to give it to everyone, even to very young people.  I told him, "No, give it only to people who are prepared for it, who have strong, stable psychic structures.  Don't give it to young people."  He said that American teen-agers are so experienced that they are like grownups in Europe.

We did not agree about this at all.
  - Albert Hoffman

from The OMNI Interviews (1984) edited by Pamela Weintraub

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #766 on: April 07, 2017, 06:58:13 PM »
On one psychotropic drug, I have experienced states in which I can contact the creators of the universe, as well as the local creative controllers - the Earth Coincidence Control Office, or ECCO.  They're the guys who run the earth and who program us, though we're not aware of it.   - John Lilly


Consciousness, free will, and values - three old thorns in the hide of science.  Materialistic science couldn't cope with any of them, even in principle.  They're in direct conflict with the basic models.  Science has had to renounce them - to deny their existence or to say that they're beyond science.

For most of us, of course, all three are among the most important things in life.
  - Roger Sperry


I'm not going to try to explain the Guyana tragedy, or to explain the almost equal tragedies of the Moonies and Scientologists.  They're still alive - some part of them, at least - but it's a kind of behavioral death.  - B. F. Skinner

from The OMNI Interviews (1984) edited by Pamela Weintraub

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #767 on: April 07, 2017, 07:36:10 PM »
You know, aggression, even violent aggression by itself, is not necessarily an evil thing.  All I'm saying is that with the present global situation, it clearly is to be proscribed, because it is harmful to everyone. Including ourselves.  We need to study it more and find ways of getting around it.  - E. O Wilson


A single tree may be five hundred years old, but there's no cell in that tree that's more than five years old.
  - W. Donner Denckla


The general human instinct to assert independence would require some effort to build into robots.  It doesn't seem to our advantage to make the effort.  - John McCarthy

from The OMNI Interviews (1984) edited by Pamela Weintraub

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #768 on: May 12, 2017, 08:21:26 PM »
  Beyond the Tumult is a story about the efforts of World War One British POWs to escape from the infamous Holzminden Prison.  There were a number of POWs that took part in the attempts (I say 'attempts' because a number of them were made.) but the story line basically follows three pilots who were captured after their planes were shot down.  This was a great feature of the book because it went into ample detail as to how the pilots were shot down and captured.

  There were non German employees at the prison that gave the inmates much needed supplies for the escape attempts and things like maps and compasses were smuggled in through the men's packages received from home.  Tunnel systems were used in the attempts and they were quite convoluted.  The final tunnel was accessed through a second story room, oddly enough.  The story took place back in 1917. 

  Amazon has hardbound copies of the book for sale, $2.00 plus and whatever postage.  I have read this book several times throughout the years.  Good read, and a true one.


Front cover showing an exposed tunnel.


Back cover showing the three men that the story follows.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #769 on: May 12, 2017, 08:37:07 PM »
On one psychotropic drug, I have experienced states in which I can contact the creators of the universe, as well as the local creative controllers - the Earth Coincidence Control Office, or ECCO.  They're the guys who run the earth and who program us, though we're not aware of it.   - John Lilly

Great magazine and quotes!

Didn't a recent, frequent guest Graham Hancock (I think, maybe it was someone else) claim visions of gears and machinery being run by small people under DMT (ayahuasca variety?) I recall lots of "little people" talk in an old(er) book "Varieties of the Psychadelic Experience) but more only with 'natural' varieties, but also with chemical derived DMT?

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #770 on: May 13, 2017, 02:06:37 AM »
https://thepiratebay.org/torrent/7790414/OMNI_Magazine_1978--1995
https://thepiratebay.org/torrent/7766357/Omni_Magazine_(the_complete_run)

I love you...






Almost done with The Secret History of Twin Peaks, I'm at peak hype for the new season. Frost must have been a huge fan of Art Bell, he spends a lot of time weaving narrative with classic coast material. Reverse speech even gets a mention, ;) .

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #771 on: June 16, 2017, 06:12:18 PM »


The local library had a free (donation) book sale a couple of months ago and I was able to grab three or four books from it.  Did I donate?  No.  The library gets plenty of my tax dollars, and has carte blanche for raising the yearly tax rate a certain percentage for the next three or so years.  But I digress.

I have always liked Paul Harvey and his daily news and comments program.  Also his 'The Rest of the Story' feature.  I needed a break from WWI books so I gave "Good Day!" a read.  Cutting to the quick, was it worth the zero amount of money I paid for the book?  Yes, but the book was lacking in certain areas and I won't be reading it again so it's got a date with Goodwill.

The author did a fair job of  giving the reader a glimpse into Paul's life but it seems like there were only enough Paul Harvey factoids to fill a twenty page book. There was  lots of 'padding' in this book.  The author spends way too much time in describing historical events that transpired while Paul was alive, way too long biographies of the people that Paul worked with (and many that he had never met.) long transcripts of the speeches made during Angel Harvey's (Paul's wife) funeral and kind of a boring history of radio broadcasting in general.  And that's the rest of the story.

But there were some items of interest that I enjoyed reading about, and here they are:

1. When Paul Harvey was three years old, his dad (who worked with the local police dept. in administration) went out to do some night time rabbit hunting with a friend.  As they were walking by the road, a car rolled up and two bandits got out and held Paul's dad and his buddy up.  The head crook recognized the men as being part of the police dept. so he plugged the poor guys.  Paul's dad lasted the night but died the next day.  The friend was able to put the finger on the dude who did the shooting and the two men were arrested.  The townsfolk were mad and wanted a lynching, but were talked out of it...fair trial and justice be served, and all.  Yeah, right.  The two mugs did a few years of prison but were let off way too early because they didn't get a 'fair trial.'

2. Paul was covering a story that security at a local defense plant was lacking.  He tried to test the system by jumping over a wall, but he was nabbed.  Paul could have been in serious trouble but he was let off the hook after he promised to double check his news sources.

3. "The Rest of the Story" program was written and produced by Paul's son.

4. The author got to meet Paul Harvey at his (Paul's) office.  After he entered the correct floor of the building, he could hear the tap-pity tap of Paul's typewriter long before he entered the room.  Paul never used computers for anything other then checking out the progress of his stocks.

It should be noted that Paul Harvey did not have a hand in the writing of this book.  He didn't even know about it, and he died a couple of weeks previous to the book's final draft. 

There is a YouTube video that shows Paul giving one of his last speechs before a roomful of publishers or writers, I can't remember which.  It was a good speech but the thing I remember the most about it was when Paul finished up.  He grinned at the warm applause and then, with his wife, made a beeline for the exit.  He quick shook a few hands but did so on the run.  The camera followed them as they made their way to the back of the room where they disappeared into a hallway.  I don't know, I just thought that was kind of a cool move by a guy that I have long admired.       
 

 

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #772 on: July 14, 2017, 07:36:14 PM »


  Doughboy's Diary by Chester E. Baker and written by Baker, who recounts his experiences in World War One.  He was in a National Guard outfit from Pennsylvania and his reminiscences are a notch above most other great war diary's because before the war started,  he took part in the search for Pancho Villa down Mexico way.

  Nicely written book, not overly long and it has some pictures.

  Baker and his unit got over to France in time to catch the last year of the war.  He managed to dodge the direct attack style of fighting that was common to many American forces back then.  His division played more of a backup roll and it seemed to step in after the major fighting had been done.  But they still had lots of high explosive shells tossed their way.  A number of his pals were killed and he spent his fair share of time sleeping in the mud.  And the 'cooties' were there, too.

  One of the things I remember about reading the book...  Chester was standing around in a deserted village when he and some others became the target of numerous exploding shells and machine gun fire and this after they had assumed that they had the Germans on the run.  After things had quieted down, he heard a faint voice calling out for help.  He located the injured soldier and saw to his horror that it was his first cousin lying there badly wounded.  His cousin was deathly pale and all that Chester could do was slip a lit cigarette between his cousin's lips and call out for a stretcher.  Private Baker was stupefied as to what he was going to tell his aunt and uncle when his cousin would no doubt die.  He had promised them that he would look out for the boy and keep him safe.  Well, as it turned out he didn't have to worry about it because his cousin was shipped home and made a full recovery.

  Amazon sells the book.  $6.00 for a used copy or $4.99 Kindle edition.