Author Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club  (Read 68869 times)

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Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #60 on: May 16, 2012, 05:00:06 PM »
Excellent post-review, Jasmine. Thanks for posting this. I too am a bibliophile, and The Russian Album seems to be one that I would very much enjoy delving into. I think my mother would also enjoy reading it. Gracias for the heads-up.

I myself am curently reading "The Great Deluge - Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast" by Douglas Brinkley. I'm about 40% through it, but will definitely post my thoughts on it once I've finished. It's pretty engrossing, and deeply disturbing (understatement). The sheer ineptitude of a host of state and federal agencies-administrations and the helpless, hopeless plight of a city's poverty-stricken populace whose cries for help went virtually ignored.







Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #61 on: May 16, 2012, 05:13:19 PM »
What are YOU reading?

reading this thread at the moment.

 there is another reading book thread, but i like the name of this one. an OUTSTANDING Subject Title...
 Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #62 on: May 16, 2012, 05:25:51 PM »
there is another reading book thread, but i like the name of this one.


the new one was merged into the old, but the new title was applied to the resulting merged thread.


Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #63 on: May 16, 2012, 05:42:05 PM »

the new one was merged into the old, but the new title was applied to the resulting merged thread.

cool. your preemptory and extremely brilliant choice to go with the new title ended my polling assault.   8)

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #64 on: May 16, 2012, 10:32:20 PM »
Mencken.  If you've never had the pleasure, pick up something with his name on it.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #65 on: May 16, 2012, 10:46:43 PM »
Mencken.  If you've never had the pleasure, pick up something with his name on it.

           Mencken Chrestomathy, any volume, is worth reading. Any budding misanthrope would be well served reading him.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #66 on: May 17, 2012, 03:34:27 AM »
         Any budding misanthrope would be well served reading him.

Noory: It's a cookbook! Do you remember that Twilight Zone episode?!

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #67 on: May 17, 2012, 06:35:44 AM »
Noory: It's a cookbook! Do you remember that Twilight Zone episode?!

haha

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #68 on: May 17, 2012, 06:57:52 AM »
Harry Partch - Genesis Of A Music: An Account Of A Creative Work, Its Roots, And Its Fulfillments - an American original takes a non-Western look at music.

The misanthropes on this forum might like anything by Florence King - I especially like her essay on The Duh people.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #69 on: May 17, 2012, 10:46:12 AM »
Jacques Pepin- "The Apprentice: my life in the kitchen"

Really interesting book about this guy.  He was Charles de Gaulle's personal chef.  I love his TV cooking shows.

I was unaware this guy had a show or a book.  I stumbled across his really cool recipe for cooking those little potatoes somewhere and have used it at holiday dinners.  People loved them. 

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #70 on: May 17, 2012, 12:59:07 PM »
Excellent post-review, Jasmine. Thanks for posting this. I too am a bibliophile, and The Russian Album seems to be one that I would very much enjoy delving into. I think my mother would also enjoy reading it. Gracias for the heads-up.

You and your mom will love the book - trust.  And thank you for the heads-up on your current read. I think I'll put that one in my book cart, too.

And for those here who mentioned Margaret Atwood, I agree - she's outstanding, as is another Canadian best-selling writer, the divine Alice Munro. Carried Away: A Selection of Stories and Lives of Girls and Women are two that I especially enjoyed.

Ah...so many books...so little time. I love to haunt used bookstores.

"The Ultimate Penpals"

One gem that I read that just popped into my mind is the superlative 84, Charing Cross Road, by the prolific and late Helene Hanff. This one is for book lovers everywhere, especially those who love to hunt around in used and antique book stores - the wonderful old fashioned ones - not the Barnes & Noble type. This book is the result of a true life relationship that spanned between 1949 and 1968 between Hanff, a struggling freelance New York City based writer, and Frank Doel, a London based antiquarian book buyer. Their entire relationship is initiated and sustained by written letters that fly both ways across the Atlantic (the book contains 99% of all their correspondence - it is the book). What begins as a simple rare book request in 1949 from Helene to the Marks & Co. bookshop in London morphs into a deeply profound, mutually rewarding, and heartfelt platonic nineteen year friendship between the ballsy, aggressive (yet sensitive) Helene and the quietly reserved, dignified and eloquent Frank.

One (of many) beautiful aspects of this book is how the people who inhabit Frank Doel's British post-war world (work colleagues, his wife, etc.) are wondrously drawn into Helene's life - again, via written letters...posted the old fashioned way.

A simply lovely and compelling story that can be read in one sitting...and read again should you require affirmation in human kindness and genuine friendship.

Helene Hanff quotes from 84, Charing Cross Road:

“I do love secondhand books that open to the page some previous owner read oftenest. The day Hazlitt came he opened to "I hate to read new books," and I hollered "Comrade!" to whoever owned it before me.”

“I love inscriptions on flyleaves and notes in margins, I like the comradely sense of turning pages someone else turned, and reading passages someone long gone has called my attention to.”


“It looks too new and pristine ever to have been read by anyone else, but it as been: it keeps falling open at the most delightful places as the ghost of its former owner points me to things I've never read before.”


“But I don't know, maybe it's just as well I never got there. I dreamed about it for so many years. I used to go to English movies just to look at the streets. I remember years ago a guy I knew told me that people going to England find exactly what they go looking for. I said I'd go looking for the England of English Literature, and he nodded and said: "It's there.”
_____________________________________________________________________________

“If you happen to pass by 84 Charing Cross Road, kiss it for me? I owe it so much.”
- Helene Hanff (and Jasmine, after finishing the book).








Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #71 on: May 17, 2012, 01:44:07 PM »
I look forward to the summer when I can read for pleasure again.  600-1000 pages of required reading for school each week, while often interesting, just about kills it for me.


The Great Deluge looks interesting.  I should check it out... when I can.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #72 on: May 17, 2012, 02:38:11 PM »
I wish I could tell yall about some great book I've been reading but the last thing I've actually read on paper was one of those religious "change yer ways or yer going to hell" booklets that the crazy people give you before you get on the subway here in Philly... I've got a ton of e-books on my phone but the dern screen is too small to really actively read ANYTHING... maybe I'll try to rustle up a kindle! That whole paper and ink thing seems a bit bulky to me.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #73 on: May 17, 2012, 05:21:05 PM »
 
        Three books that I'm very fond of and recommend to any sorry soul who is like-minded.

             Leigh Montville's biography of Ted Williams(the crionic headless hitter extraordinaire, not the big voiced homeless DJ) is brilliant, very honest and frank look at a flawed icon.

            Al Kooper "Backstage Stage Passes and Backstabbing Bastards" is a very entertaining account of the great, but increasingly obscure musician, that played with many legends from Bob Dylan to the Stones to George Harrison. Funny, self-effacing and full of bile to those who he thinks screwed him.

         Maury Terry's "The Ultimate Evil" he takes a lot of leaps in this book, connecting Son Of Sam with Manson etc...but some of the evidence is pretty compelling. David Berkowitz was clearly not acting alone and was part of a larger(how much is at dispute) network of psychos operating in the mid 70's to mid 80's if this book is to be believed.
 

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #74 on: May 17, 2012, 06:09:26 PM »
That whole paper and ink thing seems a bit bulky to me.

The Braille version of my somewhat wordy business card is the size of a trucker's mud-flap.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #75 on: May 17, 2012, 06:11:47 PM »

The misanthropes on this forum might like anything by Florence King - I especially like her essay on The Duh people.

Florence King is great.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #76 on: May 17, 2012, 06:20:16 PM »

One gem that I read that just popped into my mind is the superlative 84, Charing Cross Road, by the prolific and late Helene Hanff. This one is for book lovers everywhere, especially those who love to hunt around in used and antique book stores - the wonderful old fashioned ones - not the Barnes & Noble type. This book is the result of a true life relationship that spanned between 1949 and 1968 between Hanff, a struggling freelance New York City based writer, and Frank Doel, a London based antiquarian book buyer. Their entire relationship is initiated and sustained by written letters that fly both ways across the Atlantic (the book contains 99% of all their correspondence - it is the book). What begins as a simple rare book request in 1949 from Helene to the Marks & Co. bookshop in London morphs into a deeply profound, mutually rewarding, and heartfelt platonic nineteen year friendship between the ballsy, aggressive (yet sensitive) Helene and the quietly reserved, dignified and eloquent Frank.

One (of many) beautiful aspects of this book is how the people who inhabit Frank Doel's British post-war world (work colleagues, his wife, etc.) are wondrously drawn into Helene's life - again, via written letters...posted the old fashioned way.

A simply lovely and compelling story that can be read in one sitting...and read again should you require affirmation in human kindness and genuine friendship.

You know, you and my wife would get along famously. She too loves Alice Munro's books, and also this one by Hanff. Have you ever seen the 1987 film version of "84" with Anthony Hopkins and Anne Bancroft? If not, you have to check it out.

(Helene Hanff quote from the book)
“I love inscriptions on flyleaves and notes in margins, I like the comradely sense of turning pages someone else turned, and reading passages someone long gone has called my attention to.”

Beautiful. And so very true.

I'll come back with my own literary recommendations soon.



        Three books that I'm very fond of and recommend to any sorry soul who is like-minded.
     

            Al Kooper "Backstage Stage Passes and Backstabbing Bastards" is a very entertaining account of the great, but increasingly obscure musician, that played with many legends from Bob Dylan to the Stones to George Harrison. Funny, self-effacing and full of bile to those who he thinks screwed him.

         Maury Terry's "The Ultimate Evil" he takes a lot of leaps in this book, connecting Son Of Sam with Manson etc...but some of the evidence is pretty compelling. David Berkowitz was clearly not acting alone and was part of a larger(how much is at dispute) network of psychos operating in the mid 70's to mid 80's if this book is to be believed.

Thanks, Eddie. Both of these sound intriguing. I've jotted the titles down. Gracias.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #77 on: May 18, 2012, 03:18:50 AM »
Anyone know any good books about plants that eat people?  Because those are my favs.  I am being totally serious here.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #78 on: May 18, 2012, 10:22:40 AM »
I look forward to the summer when I can read for pleasure again.  600-1000 pages of required reading for school each week, while often interesting, just about kills it for me.

I sympathize, only for me it's being forced to read bad writing for a living. 

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #79 on: May 18, 2012, 10:26:07 AM »

        Three books that I'm very fond of and recommend to any sorry soul who is like-minded.

             Leigh Montville's biography of Ted Williams(the crionic headless hitter extraordinaire, not the big voiced homeless DJ) is brilliant, very honest and frank look at a flawed icon.

            Al Kooper "Backstage Stage Passes and Backstabbing Bastards" is a very entertaining account of the great, but increasingly obscure musician, that played with many legends from Bob Dylan to the Stones to George Harrison. Funny, self-effacing and full of bile to those who he thinks screwed him.

         Maury Terry's "The Ultimate Evil" he takes a lot of leaps in this book, connecting Son Of Sam with Manson etc...but some of the evidence is pretty compelling. David Berkowitz was clearly not acting alone and was part of a larger(how much is at dispute) network of psychos operating in the mid 70's to mid 80's if this book is to be believed.

Why do we seem to have so much in common?  Is it the grumpy curmudgeon thing?

Putting these on my list. 

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #80 on: May 18, 2012, 11:21:15 AM »
Why do we seem to have so much in common?  Is it the grumpy curmudgeon thing?

Putting these on my list.
         It's gotta be. Embrace the inner curmudgeon! I didn't have a say in the matter though, mine is congenital. When you're reading books like "The Killing of Joey Gallo", "Helter Skelter" and "The Man With The Candy" at age 5...well, I don't know how that kid doesn't become an ultra-pessimist.
         A very observant( ::) ) neighbor of mine just told me that Aretha Franklin will croak soon, because "they go in threes". A very bold prediction indeed that a 71 year old,obsese,cancer stricken,heart troubled woman will die eventually.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #81 on: May 18, 2012, 11:26:04 AM »
         It's gotta be. Embrace the inner curmudgeon! I didn't have a say in the matter though, mine is congenital. When you're reading books like "The Killing of Joey Gallo", "Helter Skelter" and "The Man With The Candy" at age 5...well, I don't know how that kid doesn't become an ultra-pessimist.
         A very observant( ::) ) neighbor of mine just told me that Aretha Franklin will croak soon, because "they go in threes". A very bold prediction indeed that a 71 year old,obsese,cancer stricken,heart troubled woman will die eventually.

Heh heh.  I was obsessed with Lizzie Borden by the time I was 8. 

Aretha--that'll be an era-ending death as far as I'm concerned. 

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #82 on: May 18, 2012, 06:07:02 PM »
Heh heh.  I was obsessed with Lizzie Borden by the time I was 8. 


I became obsessed with Lizzie Borden in 1975 when I saw her portrayed on broadcast television by a naked Elizabeth Montgomery. Those outstanding, stellar, majestic legs, transporting that whacking axe .... that was some serious information to my young brain.

I could veritably feel a Frankenstein lab switch being thrown - resulting in an arc of behavioral electricity.

Circuit complete. Imprint successful.

As I am sure Bones knows, given her obsession, according to Rhonda McClure, writing for Genealogy Magazine, Lizzie was Montgomery's sixth cousin, both descending from 17th-century Massachusetts resident John Luther.

I sympathize, only for me it's being forced to read bad writing for a living. 

I was unaware you worked at Glimmer Train.   ;)

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #83 on: May 30, 2012, 08:47:46 AM »
I have an ipad... tried to read a book on it... cant do it. Fuck the trees, I want a tangible-fold the page down and write on it-paper book.

my current reading list includes:

Anatomy of an Epidemic by Robert Whitaker

Right Brain and the Unconscious by Dr. R. Joseph

Storm Front by Jim Butcher

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #84 on: May 31, 2012, 07:04:36 PM »
Wow! I just noticed this thread.

Myself, I've spent a lot of time reading James Rollins and Brad Thor novels. Also three or so by Jeremy Robinson. For those who are unfamiliar with the type of novel they write, it is a combination of Indiana Jones or special forces combined with legends bordering on the supernatural or sinister global plots and intrigue.

I've also read a lot of Arthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov, Gregory Benford, David Brin and Stephen Baxter. I find these five individuals, all of which are/were scientists at a research/academic professorship level to produce hard science fiction with an interesting story line. A rare combination indeed for a scientist to have an imagination other than researching his/her own field of expertise.

I recommend "The Songs of Distant Earth" by Clarke and the Galactic Center series by Gregory Benford at this time.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #85 on: May 31, 2012, 07:08:37 PM »
         It's gotta be. Embrace the inner curmudgeon! I didn't have a say in the matter though, mine is congenital. When you're reading books like "The Killing of Joey Gallo", "Helter Skelter" and "The Man With The Candy" at age 5...well, I don't know how that kid doesn't become an ultra-pessimist.
         A very observant( ::) ) neighbor of mine just told me that Aretha Franklin will croak soon, because "they go in threes". A very bold prediction indeed that a 71 year old,obsese,cancer stricken,heart troubled woman will die eventually.
Ed, that is some heavy reading for a five year old. What do/did you do for a living?  Retired?

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #86 on: May 31, 2012, 07:35:04 PM »
Ed, that is some heavy reading for a five year old. What do/did you do for a living?  Retired?

        A bit of demence precoce. Beginning at age 14, my ill chosen occupations have been: laborer for the City and State , sanitation, laborer at a hockey rink(greatest job ever-age 18-20) corrections officer(briefly) Postal Worker(they took my twenties from me, kinda like how Eric Roberts lost his thumb in the Pope of Greenwich Village) and leading me into finally(I hope) teaching...though I'm not tenured. My history degree seems to have cost more than it's worth.

           And I won't mention my time in the "gaming" industry as a young buck.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #87 on: May 31, 2012, 10:31:36 PM »
        A bit of demence precoce. Beginning at age 14, my ill chosen occupations have been: laborer for the City and State , sanitation, laborer at a hockey rink(greatest job ever-age 18-20) corrections officer(briefly) Postal Worker(they took my twenties from me, kinda like how Eric Roberts lost his thumb in the Pope of Greenwich Village) and leading me into finally(I hope) teaching...though I'm not tenured. My history degree seems to have cost more than it's worth.

           And I won't mention my time in the "gaming" industry as a young buck.
"Teaching". Seems as though you've tried a variety of jobs and have a lot of real life experience in so doing. Curious as to the use of the term "tenured". Do you hold advanced degrees in the subject and if so what is the area of your research and are you teaching at the college level?

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #88 on: May 31, 2012, 11:16:33 PM »
"Teaching". Seems as though you've tried a variety of jobs and have a lot of real life experience in so doing. Curious as to the use of the term "tenured". Do you hold advanced degrees in the subject and if so what is the area of your research and are you teaching at the college level?
         I use "tenured" in a extremely sardonic fashion, getting full time in a public school system is hard enough. Really gives heft to the feeling to you have to be a rat to be in the rat race-way too many ambitious assholes to my liking. My realism and pragmatism isn't exactly welcomed. I went to the horrible public schools that I teach in: these fucking 25 year old dreamers who went to private schools and elite colleges and now teach in "inner city" settings have no idea how the real world works. These "teachers" are routinely walked over by 15 year olds. They think Hollywood horseshit like "Stand and Deliver" and "Dangerous Minds" can be achieved on their watch. And my degree deals with European History...which is essentially useless where I teach.

          Recently, I put the answers for an exam, all 30 questions, on the chalkboard before class.I kept them up there for 30 minutes and then said : "alright, test time" and erased the board. Only TWO of the 45 students seemed to realize that the fucking answers had been staring them in the face! Pathetic...only 7 kids got more than 60%. And we're talking remedial social studies. State capitals and shit that your basic 8 year old should know. Except I'm teaching 10th graders.
         

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #89 on: June 01, 2012, 12:20:20 AM »
         I use "tenured" in a extremely sardonic fashion, getting full time in a public school system is hard enough. Really gives heft to the feeling to you have to be a rat to be in the rat race-way too many ambitious assholes to my liking. My realism and pragmatism isn't exactly welcomed. I went to the horrible public schools that I teach in: these fucking 25 year old dreamers who went to private schools and elite colleges and now teach in "inner city" settings have no idea how the real world works. These "teachers" are routinely walked over by 15 year olds. They think Hollywood horseshit like "Stand and Deliver" and "Dangerous Minds" can be achieved on their watch. And my degree deals with European History...which is essentially useless where I teach.

          Recently, I put the answers for an exam, all 30 questions, on the chalkboard before class.I kept them up there for 30 minutes and then said : "alright, test time" and erased the board. Only TWO of the 45 students seemed to realize that the fucking answers had been staring them in the face! Pathetic...only 7 kids got more than 60%. And we're talking remedial social studies. State capitals and shit that your basic 8 year old should know. Except I'm teaching 10th graders.
         
God Almighty ... that is fucking terrible. I think I learned all the states and their capitols in like 5th grade but that was a few light years ago and in a galaxy far, far away.

European history huh? I like that stuff as one can learn, if taught properly rather than just names, which king killed the other one and how to place the incessant killing in some kind of chronological order.

So Charlemagne was Charles Martel's grandson and the "Hammer" saved Europe from Islam. Too bad nobody could actually save Europe from the Huns and Mongols. Those two groups were fucking insane. Toss in a couple of black plagues and I'm surprised any Europeans survived over that 800 year period. What a miserable fucking time to be alive.

Well Ed, I certainly hope you're getting paid well. Is combat pay included? How long do the educated elite from Elite U. take before they have to take them out in a straight jacket or on a gurney? Violence?