Author Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club  (Read 68863 times)

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Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #30 on: October 16, 2011, 07:05:59 PM »
 
     Peter Levenda  "Sinister Forces, Book 3: The Manson Secret"
     Sean Willentz  "Bob Dylan in America" 
     HW Brands     "American Colossus: The Trimuph of Capitalism in America 1865-1900"
     David Willman "The Mirage Man: Bruce Ivins, The Anthrax Attacks and America's Rush to War"
      Rob Young "Electric Eden"
                                                                                             
 
 
 
 

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #31 on: October 30, 2011, 05:47:08 PM »
I am currently reading 'The Terror Conspiracy Revisited' by Jim Marrs. 

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #32 on: October 30, 2011, 11:57:16 PM »
I'm back to zombie novels... my Kindle is going to bite me soon


Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #33 on: October 31, 2011, 02:55:24 AM »
I just finished Graham Hancock's 'Supernatural - meetings with the ancient teachers of mankind', and Rick Straussman's 'DMT The Spirit Molecule'

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #34 on: November 13, 2011, 02:32:02 AM »
"Suddenly We Didn't Want to Die: Memoirs of a World War I Marine," by Elton E. Mackin

I've just started reading this book. Very captivating, it's going to be a good one.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #35 on: December 03, 2011, 12:45:41 PM »
Family of Secrets by Russ Baker.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #36 on: December 03, 2011, 02:42:49 PM »
Shaq Uncut: My Story

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #37 on: December 09, 2011, 05:30:21 AM »
The 13th Hour: A Thriller by Richard Doetsch


 

Amazon link

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #38 on: December 11, 2011, 03:58:49 PM »
 
    "The Fence: A Police Cover-Up Along Boston's Racial Divide" by Dick Lehr
     "Arguably: Essays By Christopher Hitchens" by...duh
      "Dirty! Dirty! Dirty!" by Mike Edison (about Playboy/Penthouse/Hustler/Screw)
 

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #39 on: December 13, 2011, 08:58:03 PM »
How many people here use e-readers, and which one do you use?


   I have a Kindle (first gen) a family member gave me.  I find it handy for traveling, but I still like to hold a physical book in my hands.  I feel torn between the convenience of e-books, and actually having a physical book on the self.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #40 on: December 13, 2011, 10:13:17 PM »
Judas Unchained By Peter F. Hamilton

It is the sequel to the space opera Pandora's Star.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #41 on: December 13, 2011, 10:30:27 PM »
Jacques Pepin- "The Apprentice: my life in the kitchen"

Really interesting book about this guy.  He was Charles de Gaulle's personal chef.  I love his TV cooking shows. 

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #42 on: December 14, 2011, 03:34:09 PM »
How many people here use e-readers, and which one do you use?


   I have a Kindle (first gen) a family member gave me.  I find it handy for traveling, but I still like to hold a physical book in my hands.  I feel torn between the convenience of e-books, and actually having a physical book on the self.
I have a nook color. I love it! I had to stop buying physical books. I ran out of room on my shelves. However, I do miss physical books sometimes. When I do, I just go to the library. You can also borrow ebooks for your ereader.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #43 on: December 20, 2011, 04:08:03 AM »
I have a nook color. I love it! I had to stop buying physical books. I ran out of room on my shelves. However, I do miss physical books sometimes. When I do, I just go to the library. You can also borrow ebooks for your ereader.


  Do your eyes get tired reading on the LCD screen, and if so, do you wish you'd bought a e-reader with and e-ink screen?

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #44 on: December 20, 2011, 06:35:37 AM »

  Do your eyes get tired reading on the LCD screen, and if so, do you wish you'd bought a e-reader with and e-ink screen?

I'm trying to save up for a Kindle Fire.  Some time after the new year, I hope.  I like the "feel" of books, too--an old comfort I don't want to lose.  Anyway, the only bad thing I've heard about the Fire is the "ease" of ordering buttons that children apparently use.  My kids are old enough to "pay" for their own purchases.  :D 
Of course, maybe a laptop would be a better choice.  Dunno.......

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #45 on: December 25, 2011, 12:28:16 PM »
I have been very pleased, and disturbed by the "Sinister Forces" Peter Levenda trilogy, and also by Russ Baker's "Family Secrets".

My latest reading venture is "Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History" by S.C. Gwynne.
http://www.amazon.com/Empire-Summer-Moon-Comanches-Powerful/dp/1416591052
It's the straight, non-PC dope on American manifest destiny and the last bothersome tribal elements that stood in the way.  Quanah Parker has always been one of my American heroes (named one of my sons after him)- the story of the Bin Laden of his day, who was neither assassinated or gitmoed, but actually successfully integrated into territorial American culture.  Shorthand version of the story: The son of a kidnapped white woman and a Comanche warrior, Quanah did a lot of damage to Texan and Mexican pioneers, his people effectively keeping the Spanish from laying claim to the Great Plains.  Following his (near) death-bed conversion from killer to peyote prophet, his acquiescence to the Dawes Act essentially opened up the west to the new immigrants whose descendants many of us are.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #46 on: December 25, 2011, 05:42:01 PM »
The Girl Who Played with Fire.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #47 on: December 25, 2011, 05:43:03 PM »

  Do your eyes get tired reading on the LCD screen, and if so, do you wish you'd bought a e-reader with and e-ink screen?
Sorry for not responding sooner. The display is great. No pain or strain.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #48 on: January 03, 2012, 05:31:24 AM »
   I have always liked B&N.  I think they will remain competitive in the e-book market.  If I were to buy a new e-reader I would go with the Nook, because it supports the epub format.


Any good reads over the holidays, anyone?


I have a few but I'll have to post them another time.




Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #49 on: January 03, 2012, 06:07:46 AM »
For someone who considers themselves a geek I'm ashamed to admit I never read "The Hobbit" or "The Lord of the Rings" until this Christmas. I just finished "Return of the King" yesterday and I am super impressed. These are mind blowing, fantastic reads and I'm an idiot for putting off reading Tolkien's work for this long.

My next read is going to be "No Angel" by Jay Dobyns. I first heard of this guy during an interview with Ian on C2C and when a coworker gave me his copy I jumped at the chance.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #50 on: January 03, 2012, 06:58:24 AM »
Any good reads over the holidays, anyone?

Star Wars: The Old Republic
Fatal Alliance
By: Sean Williams

It's not the worst EU novel I've ever read, the black fleet crisis trilogy comes to mind as a shining example of how not to write interesting novels.  There is decent character development, but the book contains about six unique and concurrent story lines, this is something that the great Timothy Zahn didn't attempt.  Over all the novel is worth reading but it's not very smooth and feels a bit rushed.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #51 on: January 05, 2012, 04:03:22 AM »
I have been reading the noir novels of Kelli Stanley. One series is set, as is customary, in 1940's San Francisco. It begins with City of Dragons. You will never guess whodunnit or why. The other series begins with Nox Dormienda, and is set in Roman Britain. Both are outstanding in historical detail (the author's website is quite fascinating; she has a Master's degree in Classics, btw).

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #52 on: January 05, 2012, 12:26:43 PM »
Lee Child The Killing Floor

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #53 on: January 08, 2012, 05:05:42 PM »
Just started Off the road by Carolyn Cassady, wife of Neal. Utterly compelling. I'm even skipping cigarette breaks.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #54 on: January 17, 2012, 01:28:05 AM »
Finished reading this:  Amazon Link

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #55 on: January 17, 2012, 02:09:51 AM »
Just finished Neuromancer by William Gibson. Absolutely amazing.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #56 on: January 24, 2012, 09:56:40 AM »
Recently read Nancy Wake by Russel Bradon, true story of a French Resistance fighter during ww2; a brave lady, though I can't help remembering that her somewhat reckless actions got her husband tortured to death by the Gestapo. Never mind, he's barely mentioned in the book.

Now reading I, Partridge by Steve Coogan and others less famous.
It's the fictional biography of Alan Partridge - a sad, lonely, crass radio personality who... hey, wait a minute...

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #57 on: January 25, 2012, 12:11:47 AM »
Just read the comic adaptation of The Forever War by Joe Haldeman. Wow!!

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #58 on: January 26, 2012, 04:10:47 PM »
 
        It's a depressing enough season...so some "light" reading the past few weeks, music biographies are a decent escape.
          Daniel Okrent, "Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition"
          Michael Largo, "God's Lunatics..."
          Graeme Thomson "Complicated Shadows:The Life and Music of Elvis Costello"
          Trevor Dann "Darkest than the Deepest Sea: The Search for Nick Drake"
          Patrick Humpries "Richard Thompson: The Biography"
          Joel McIver  "The Bloody Reign of Slayer"
          Glenn Hughes w/Joel McIver "Glenn Hughes:The Autobiography.."
 
 
 
 
 
 

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #59 on: May 16, 2012, 01:58:08 PM »
Hi everyone,

I thought I'd start this book thread (if it's been done before - apologies - I didn't search the archives!) and see what everyone is reading out there. What author has captured your attention? What books have you read that you simply couldn't put down? What characters resonated with you? Who did you empathize with? Who appalled, disturbed, and angered you to no end? What book made you laugh, cry, or simply ponder?

"Who were our ancestors? Who am I?"

Anyway, I read quite a bit (time permitting) and this is one fascinating, haunting, and profoundly moving book that I finally got around to - Michael Ignatieff's The Russian Album. Of all Michael Ignatieff's books, this one reached deep into my soul, as it dealt with a theme I and everyone can identify with on the deepest level - family. It's one piercing piece of work.

                                               

The Russian Album is a deeply personal, intense, melancholic account of the personal history, trials and tribulations of an extraordinary family, the Ignatieff clan, and a detailed history of that family's deep, intense connection with the Russian Imperial court during the era of the Czars. We step into a literary time machine and travel back to the family's roots and witness events, both positive and horrific, and how these incidents altered and shaped the life courses of not only the ones living during that particular time, but as well altered the lives of their future descendants - decades later. It is a deeply personal look into the life of the Ignatieff family in Russia as well as their escape after the 1917 revolution; their brief stays and experiences in both London and Paris, and their eventual journey to and settling in Canada.

Michael Ignatieff uses family photographs and excerpts from family diaries and letters to provide us with a taste of the life that his ancestors lived, but while The Russian Album brilliantly captures the golden and gilded court of Czarist Russia, it is more importantly a tome devoted to family ties - love etched deep into the bone and blood - the familial ties that bind through the course of generations. Love, laughter, pain, and the whole damn thing. For me, one of the most touching moments of the book focuses on Ignatieff's conversation with his grandfather's remaining sons about their long deceased mother and father and their memories of them, altered and re-dressed courtesy of the ensuing years, changes of heart, and perpetual grief.

The first chapter of The Russian Album contains an extremely wistful, sad, and ultimately haunting description of old family photographs - the occupants of said photos being long gone from this earth - and the questions their descendants have about the voiceless faces who share their DNA and stare out at them from the faded black and white film. Smiles and grimaces and lives and loves and hopes and realized and unfulfilled dreams, forever frozen in time. We may know tidbits of their persona based on family legends and stories passed from generation to generation, but in truth we cannot fully grasp and comprehend who these people - the blood that courses through our veins; this blood of ours that lived and walked this earth long before we did - really were. We'll never know them, and as a result there will always remain unanswered questions about ourselves and who we are. It's our loss, and it's an incredibly moving and thought-provoking piece of writing.

Anyway, this is one that I just finished. I highly recommend it. Next, I'm re-visiting Thomas Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd.

What are YOU reading?