Author Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club  (Read 70370 times)

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Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #180 on: November 17, 2013, 07:25:50 PM »
I recently read First Activation.  It was one of those books that I could not put down once I started.  There are more coming in the series. It's a post-apocalyptic theme. The authors are brothers and are new, so the book is quite cheap, with the Kindle version just $2.99.


Why do Authors start stopping/ending their books by page 250. There are still some people that like longer books. I will still read it, I do enjoy good end of the worl, we screwed everything up books. TV is a bore, george is a snore, so back to the books.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #181 on: November 17, 2013, 07:28:51 PM »
Why do Authors start stopping/ending their books by page 250. There are still some people that like longer books. I will still read it, I do enjoy good end of the worl, we screwed everything up books. TV is a bore, george is a snore, so back to the books.

The ending was very abrupt, so I'm glad they're already at work on the second in the series.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #182 on: November 17, 2013, 07:38:42 PM »
If you're looking for unusual sci-fi, you might enjoy my friend Mike Warren's book, Grey Cat Grey Day.  It's a book about crime in the near future, crime waves, flying cars, AI, and no tats- instead people have full body alterations.  I describe it as Elmore Leonard meets Philip K. Dick with a sense of humor.
Plus, it's more than 400-pages
http://www.amazon.com/Gray-Cat-Day-Michael-Warren-ebook/dp/B004IE9WWG/ref=sr_1_56?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1384738498&sr=1-56&keywords=michael+warren


Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #183 on: November 17, 2013, 07:56:09 PM »
Not C2C related, but if you like the dark, seedy underworld of sex and escorts in Tokyo, I highly recommend "People Who Eat Darkness: The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished from the Streets of Tokyo - And the Evil That Swallowed Her Up" (by Richard Parry). American girl goes to Tokyo to become a club hostess. Vanishes. I couldn't put it down.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #184 on: November 17, 2013, 07:58:45 PM »
If you're looking for unusual sci-fi, you might enjoy my friend Mike Warren's book, Grey Cat Grey Day.  It's a book about crime in the near future, crime waves, flying cars, AI, and no tats- instead people have full body alterations.  I describe it as Elmore Leonard meets Philip K. Dick with a sense of humor.
Plus, it's more than 400-pages
http://www.amazon.com/Gray-Cat-Day-Michael-Warren-ebook/dp/B004IE9WWG/ref=sr_1_56?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1384738498&sr=1-56&keywords=michael+warren

Thanks for linking to this, Juan, it looks pretty good. Adding it to my list :)

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #185 on: November 17, 2013, 08:07:14 PM »
Home made bread, home made soup, and 5% thru the book "First Activation", so far so good. Ah, who needs TV or Radio. Life is good. And thank you for such a quick recomendation. I am enjoying it.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #186 on: November 17, 2013, 08:14:52 PM »
Home made bread, home made soup, and 5% thru the book "First Activation", so far so good. Ah, who needs TV or Radio. Life is good. And thank you for such a quick recomendation. I am enjoying it.

Sounds like a nice night.  Glad you're enjoying the book.  :)

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #187 on: November 17, 2013, 08:15:33 PM »
Not C2C related, but if you like the dark, seedy underworld of sex and escorts in Tokyo, I highly recommend "People Who Eat Darkness: The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished from the Streets of Tokyo - And the Evil That Swallowed Her Up" (by Richard Parry). American girl goes to Tokyo to become a club hostess. Vanishes. I couldn't put it down.

That sounds interesting.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #188 on: November 18, 2013, 01:32:25 PM »
Why do Authors start stopping/ending their books by page 250. There are still some people that like longer books. I will still read it, I do enjoy good end of the worl, we screwed everything up books. TV is a bore, george is a snore, so back to the books.

I haven't noticed this particular point, but maybe it's related to the cost of producing thicker books?  (I'm really just spit-balling here because I don't know why it would be more costly to produce a 400-page book than a 250-pager unless the paper is so expensive). 

Perhaps publishers think readers can't absorb much beyond 250 pages (sort of like how rock songs all used to weigh in at 3 minutes exactly).

If you like big books and the sci fi genre, try Tad Williams (author of Otherland). 

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #189 on: November 18, 2013, 01:58:30 PM »
Perhaps publishers think readers can't absorb much beyond 250 pages (sort of like how rock songs all used to weigh in at 3 minutes exactly).

If you like big books and the sci fi genre, try Tad Williams (author of Otherland).

I've pretty much read most of the late 60's to 2010 sci-fi, It took me awhile to learn to read in elementry school, once I did though, books were my number one form of entertainment and always have been. On an average year I will read up to 250 books or more. One year I read something on the order of 500 plus books, all of them sci-fi, fantasy style ones. I guess that is why I am looking for new authors, quite often a lot of older books are re-issued, and while there are a lot of books I have re-read, I still like the new and new concepts as times change.

I recently read First Activation.  It was one of those books that I could not put down once I started.  There are more coming in the series. It's a post-apocalyptic theme. The authors are brothers and are new, so the book is quite cheap, with the Kindle version just $2.99.

I finished First Activation last night. It was a good read. Thank-you for the recommend.

If you're looking for unusual sci-fi, you might enjoy my friend Mike Warren's book, Grey Cat Grey Day.  It's a book about crime in the near future, crime waves, flying cars, AI, and no tats- instead people have full body alterations.  I describe it as Elmore Leonard meets Philip K. Dick with a sense of humor.
Plus, it's more than 400-pages
http://www.amazon.com/Gray-Cat-Day-Michael-Warren-ebook/dp/B004IE9WWG/ref=sr_1_56?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1384738498&sr=1-56&keywords=michael+warren

I purchased that one last night also, will start on it in soon. I generally do not go in for to many of the comedic style books, however I did read a funny Zombie book and found that I did enjoy it, so will give this one a try also. Thank you.

My most read series is W.M. Gears Spider series. I re-read that at least once every year. I find it enjoyable and the God concept very insightful. I jst wish he would do a fourth book in the series. I think his publishers have gotten way-laid on his abilities for good sci-fi because of the People of Books with his wife. oh-well maybe he will do a self publish of it one of these days, unless he signed a non-compete with his publisher.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #190 on: November 22, 2013, 06:32:27 PM »
I heard about People Who Eat Darkness on LinkedIn, when they still had reading lists. It's on my wish list. Maybe I'll just try to get it from the library.

Last night I finished Olive Kittredge by Elizabeth Strout. Before that A Taste for Death by P.D. James.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #191 on: November 22, 2013, 09:01:34 PM »
If you're looking for unusual sci-fi, you might enjoy my friend Mike Warren's book, Grey Cat Grey Day.  It's a book about crime in the near future, crime waves, flying cars, AI, and no tats- instead people have full body alterations.  I describe it as Elmore Leonard meets Philip K. Dick with a sense of humor.
Plus, it's more than 400-pages
http://www.amazon.com/Gray-Cat-Day-Michael-Warren-ebook/dp/B004IE9WWG/ref=sr_1_56?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1384738498&sr=1-56&keywords=michael+warren

Thanks, Juan.

Just snagged it at Amazon...it's on sale. :)
I'll be finishing up 11/22/63 later tonight, how appropriate, and I'll be starting it tomorrow. 

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #192 on: November 23, 2013, 12:14:59 AM »
I've pretty much read most of the late 60's to 2010 sci-fi .....

Hey Shadow Wolf.   Wow, that's alot of books!  :)  I've recently embarked on working my way (more or less) through the top 100 scifi books as defined by this link:

http://scifilists.sffjazz.com/lists_books_rank1.html

I've already read about 15 of them, but wanted to expand farther.  Was wondering if there were any on this list or elsewhere that you'd particularly recommend?

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #193 on: November 23, 2013, 01:28:40 AM »
I've already read about 15 of them, but wanted to expand farther.  Was wondering if there were any on this list or elsewhere that you'd particularly recommend?

I've read pretty much all of those books. The ones I have read twice/would read again would be:
All of the Arthur C. Clarke stuff, Fire Upon the Deep, Gateway. Startide Rising, Neuromancer, Lord of Light, the Cyberiad.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #194 on: November 23, 2013, 02:51:11 AM »
I've read pretty much all of those books. The ones I have read twice/would read again would be:
All of the Arthur C. Clarke stuff, Fire Upon the Deep, Gateway. Startide Rising, Neuromancer, Lord of Light, the Cyberiad.

Thanks for the input Monk.  I've read Gateway & Neuromancer, which were for sure two of my favorites as well (along with Hyperion and the Hitchhiker's Guide series).  I read Clarke's Rendezvous with Rama which was a little slow but I could see how it was probably influential back when it came out.  I'd like to check out some other stuff of his - I heard Childhood's End is worthy. 

Funny enough I actually have both Lord of Light and the Cyberiad on my bedside stack, ready to be dug into shortly.  And I'll definitely check out those others you mentioned too.  Btw I remember you mentioning Zelazny's Amber series in some other post somewhere, so that gives you some street cred with me.  :)


Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #195 on: November 23, 2013, 03:53:28 AM »
Funny enough I actually have both Lord of Light and the Cyberiad on my bedside stack, ready to be dug into shortly.  And I'll definitely check out those others you mentioned too.  Btw I remember you mentioning Zelazny's Amber series in some other post somewhere, so that gives you some street cred with me.  :)
Theres lots of Ancient Aliens/C2C blending with Lord of Light. Its more quality Zelazny. In addition to Amber, he wrote Dilvish the Damned which also is pretty good and its ok sequel The Changing Land.

I really liked the Cyberiad and its fairy tale/Aesops fables applied to robots and science.

A lesser known guy I like is Cordwainer Smith, who wrote sort of macabre sci fi stories. Not for the squeamish, but very imaginative.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #196 on: November 23, 2013, 06:52:21 AM »
A lesser known guy I like is Cordwainer Smith, who wrote sort of macabre sci fi stories. Not for the squeamish, but very imaginative.

Good choice.  Not to be confused with Cordwainer Bird... ::)

Zelazny's one of my favorites. :)

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #197 on: November 23, 2013, 12:49:10 PM »
Hey Shadow Wolf.   Wow, that's alot of books!  :)  I've recently embarked on working my way (more or less) through the top 100 scifi books as defined by this link:

http://scifilists.sffjazz.com/lists_books_rank1.html

I've already read about 15 of them, but wanted to expand farther.  Was wondering if there were any on this list or elsewhere that you'd particularly recommend?

   I think everyone should re-read George Orwell's 1984, and watch the movie.
Ursula K Le Guin's: Left Hand of darkness.
Arthur C Clarke: Childhoods End
Niven & Pournelle: The Mote in Gods Eye
Arthur C Clarke: Rendezvous With Rama (and the others in series)
Walter M Miller: A Canticle for Leibowitz
Daniel Keyes: Flowers for Algernon (the movie was very good also)
Ursula K Le Guin: The Lathe of Heaven

I do not understand why they have Dune ranked number 1, not a bad book series, but i would place all the above, especially 1984, above Dune.



Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #198 on: November 23, 2013, 02:39:34 PM »
Well, I can see how Dune might be ranked higher than 1984...  Dune covers sooooo much ground:  politics, religion, speculative science, the science of the mind, human cruelty, sexuality....  It's a monumental project. 

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #199 on: November 23, 2013, 03:36:33 PM »
Daniel Keyes: Flowers for Algernon (the movie was very good also)


It's been ages since I read that.  Great story.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #200 on: November 23, 2013, 05:03:48 PM »
It's been ages since I read that.  Great story.

I still have my old, ratty paperback.  I sobbed for quite a while after watching Charly.

Wonder if it's on Netflix.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #201 on: November 23, 2013, 08:01:49 PM »
   I think everyone should re-read George Orwell's 1984, and watch the movie.
Ursula K Le Guin's: Left Hand of darkness.
Arthur C Clarke: Childhoods End
Niven & Pournelle: The Mote in Gods Eye
Arthur C Clarke: Rendezvous With Rama (and the others in series)
Walter M Miller: A Canticle for Leibowitz
Daniel Keyes: Flowers for Algernon (the movie was very good also)
Ursula K Le Guin: The Lathe of Heaven

I do not understand why they have Dune ranked number 1, not a bad book series, but i would place all the above, especially 1984, above Dune.

Interesting recommendations Shadow Wolf, thank you!  I did read Canticle as part of my project and I thought honestly parts of it were a bit of a slog however still a very important book that I'm glad I read, and one that really stays with you and resonates long after you read it. 

Can you believe I've never read 1984 or Brave New World either?  Both of these oversights must be rememdied asap.

I also haven't read any Niven, not even Ringworld (hanging my head in shame).  So I must add that to the list.

I've read Le Guin's fantasy Earthsea trilogy and remember loving her subtle and elegant prose so that's a great suggestion to check out her sci-fi books, will do that for sure.

I'm actually just finishing up a re-read of Dune.  I think when I first read it I was too young and I just couldn't get into it.  Now I can appreciate it as a cool book, visionary in it's way, what with the melding of psychology and mysticism in a seductive world with all it's intrigues and characters reaching for both personal and public power.  I found it slowly worked it's magic on me and the whole is greater than the sum of it's parts.   

I haven't read a ton of sci-fi, so I don't know many I would put above Dune, but the one I think at least challenges it is the Hyperion / Fall of Hyperion series.  To me that was a triumph of imagination and writing, a work of great scope and depth that really was something special.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #202 on: November 24, 2013, 01:16:12 AM »
If you're looking for unusual sci-fi, you might enjoy my friend Mike Warren's book, Grey Cat Grey Day.  It's a book about crime in the near future, crime waves, flying cars, AI, and no tats- instead people have full body alterations.  I describe it as Elmore Leonard meets Philip K. Dick with a sense of humor.
Plus, it's more than 400-pages

Just finished the book. It was okay. I did have a hard time with the begining of the book, just to many different concepts thrown in at the begining, after struggling through the begining 20% then the story picked up for me. The ending was pretty good, I would have liked to know what happened to Thom, Akeena, and Stella though. At least it was a complete book, and yet he has left it open for other stories, so we may find out in a future book.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #203 on: November 28, 2013, 12:11:15 AM »
Just started Grant Morrison's run on Doom Patrol. Awesome so far. Like the X-Files, Millennium and Smallville all rolled into one big ball of wtf.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #204 on: December 01, 2013, 08:29:14 PM »
Awhile back I finished The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood.  I recommend it to anyone looking for something a little different.  It's kind of heavy, but it's cleverly constructed and very well-written I thought. 

Here's the B&N blurb:  "In The Blind Assassin, Margaret Atwood presents her readers with a novel-within-a-novel—or, more accurately, a story told within a novel within a novel. This complex interweaving of multiple narratives draws the reader forward through a dramatic and turbulent tale of love, betrayal, and death, while simultaneously using its structural puzzles to reconsider the act of storytelling itself. The effect is mesmerizing."


Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #205 on: December 02, 2013, 09:24:12 AM »
Just started Grant Morrison's run on Doom Patrol. Awesome so far. Like the X-Files, Millennium and Smallville all rolled into one big ball of wtf.

YES! We need to get Grant on Art's show Dark Weekend or something.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #206 on: December 03, 2013, 03:59:55 AM »
YES! We need to get Grant on Art's show Dark Weekend or something.

Now that is a really great idea

EDITED TO ADD: I brought it up on the Dark Weekend thread. The seeds have been planted!

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #207 on: December 03, 2013, 04:40:55 AM »
Reading Grant Morrison in the early nineties led directly to me posting here in the early twenteens. Stick that in yer holographic mobius loophole!

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #208 on: December 03, 2013, 12:34:05 PM »
Interesting recommendations Shadow Wolf, thank you!  I did read Canticle as part of my project and I thought honestly parts of it were a bit of a slog however still a very important book that I'm glad I read, and one that really stays with you and resonates long after you read it. 

Can you believe I've never read 1984 or Brave New World either?  Both of these oversights must be rememdied asap.

I also haven't read any Niven, not even Ringworld (hanging my head in shame).  So I must add that to the list.

I've read Le Guin's fantasy Earthsea trilogy and remember loving her subtle and elegant prose so that's a great suggestion to check out her sci-fi books, will do that for sure.

I'm actually just finishing up a re-read of Dune.  I think when I first read it I was too young and I just couldn't get into it.  Now I can appreciate it as a cool book, visionary in it's way, what with the melding of psychology and mysticism in a seductive world with all it's intrigues and characters reaching for both personal and public power.  I found it slowly worked it's magic on me and the whole is greater than the sum of it's parts.   

I haven't read a ton of sci-fi, so I don't know many I would put above Dune, but the one I think at least challenges it is the Hyperion / Fall of Hyperion series.  To me that was a triumph of imagination and writing, a work of great scope and depth that really was something special.

Honestly, I bailed out of Ring World by Niven.  First, and this is pretty silly maybe, his dustjacket photo just irritated me.  He looked far too pleased with himself.  The writing itself I thought was sloppy, short on detail.  I thought his female characters were weak (typical of a lot of scifi by male writers, unfortunately).  I know Niven is regarded as more of a "concept" writer -- his ideas are what draws most readers in.  But I need good writing, too.  I think that's why I find Asimov less than amazing.  (I know that is practically blasphemy in sci-fi circles.)  Well, that's the way it goes.  A hundred million people loved The Lord of the Rings, but there are always a handful who will say it's boring.

Re: Reading Minds: The CoastGab Book Club
« Reply #209 on: December 03, 2013, 06:53:07 PM »
I think that's why I find Asimov less than amazing. 

I've never been impressed with Asimov's writing, but I'm not sure if that is his fault or the editor's fault. That was the standard back then. The plots are fairly unoriginal, many of them are just retold 1700's South Seas exploration stories. Just make the sailing ship into a starship...etc. And the robot stories are reskinned detective pulps. Didn't do much for me.