Author Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.  (Read 8840 times)

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Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #60 on: July 06, 2016, 05:16:09 PM »
Hotels used postcards to advertise their offerings.  This is the Hotel Marsh in Van Wert, Ohio.  The place is still there and it has retained it's name.  (It is also called the Marsh Hotel.)   Unfortunately, you can't book a room there.  According to Wikipedia, the top floors are used for storage but the first floor/lobby area can be booked for banquets, weddings and other types of gatherings.  The basement can also be rented for parties, etc. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marsh_Hotel



Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #61 on: July 09, 2016, 06:01:37 PM »
I don't quite understand why the sleeping dude wants his wife or girlfriend to wind up on the wrong side of a cactus plant.  Perhaps it's his ex-wife?  I do like the colors on this postcard.

It is postmarked August 21, 1941 but that's a 1939 Presidential coil stamp of George Washington.  Worth a measly 20 cents used, but $50.00 unused.         

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #62 on: July 09, 2016, 09:26:03 PM »
Ahh, the golden days of radio...

http://www.antiqueradio.com/May01_radiopostcards.html

As the pictures in this article show, one can see what a vital role radio played in various cities, particularly in the 40s-70s.  Many of these stations had massive studios, such as WXYZ in Detroit--a high rise with towers on top of the building! 

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I love the Art Deco and Mid-Century architecture of many of the buildings, such as this one from Montana.

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Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #63 on: July 10, 2016, 04:53:24 PM »
Thanks again, Uhura.  Great post and link on radio related postcards.  Also, your post reminded me that I have a postcard (at least I think it's a postcard) of an armature radio operator having received a signal from another operator clear across the U.S. (I'm thinking that's what it is anyway.)  I bought it off of ebay because I liked the earth and the radio waves coming off of it.  It's got radio information on the front that I don't understand because I don't know anything about amateur radio.  Art would surely know what the printed and written words mean.

Looks like Virgil Marquardt, from a place called Monroe, Oregon got in radio contact with a Mr. Leonard Taddio of Fredonia, New York at 6:50pm on July 22, 1956.  Then I guess they send each other their respective radio number cards proving that they were in contact with each other.  At least that's what I think is going on here. 

That's a picture of Mr. Taddio down below.  Yeah, weird the things you can find on the internet, huh?  The photo went with Mr. Taddio's Find A Grave listing.  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Taddio&GSfn=Leonard+&GSmn=J.&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=90147981&df=all& 

Just when I start thinking that our lives are like needles in haystacks, something like this comes up.  It's kind of fascinating how long forgotten people can occasionally be remembered.  That's one of the things I like about the 100 years ago thread.
 

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #64 on: July 10, 2016, 07:41:14 PM »
Thanks again, Uhura.  Great post and link on radio related postcards.  Also, your post reminded me that I have a postcard (at least I think it's a postcard) of an armature radio operator having received a signal from another operator clear across the U.S. (I'm thinking that's what it is anyway.)  I bought it off of ebay because I liked the earth and the radio waves coming off of it.  It's got radio information on the front that I don't understand because I don't know anything about amateur radio.  Art would surely know what the printed and written words mean.

Looks like Virgil Marquardt, from a place called Monroe, Oregon got in radio contact with a Mr. Leonard Taddio of Fredonia, New York at 6:50pm on July 22, 1956.  Then I guess they send each other their respective radio number cards proving that they were in contact with each other.  At least that's what I think is going on here. 

That's a picture of Mr. Taddio down below.  Yeah, weird the things you can find on the internet, huh?  The photo went with Mr. Taddio's Find A Grave listing.  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Taddio&GSfn=Leonard+&GSmn=J.&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=90147981&df=all& 

Just when I start thinking that our lives are like needles in haystacks, something like this comes up.  It's kind of fascinating how long forgotten people can occasionally be remembered.  That's one of the things I like about the 100 years ago thread.
His Obit, that was on here but no more, mentioned he was a big fan of the Yankees and would discuss it over the airwaves and also a Mason--- that must be why he wasn't prosecuted for violating the disclaimers during every bb broadcast: ""Any rebroadcast, retransmission, or account of this game, without the express written consent of Major League Baseball, is prohibited."   ;)

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #65 on: July 10, 2016, 07:59:47 PM »
His Obit, that was on here but no more, mentioned he was a big fan of the Yankees and would discuss it over the airwaves and also a Mason--- that must be why he wasn't prosecuted for violating the disclaimers during every bb broadcast: ""Any rebroadcast, retransmission, or account of this game, without the express written consent of Major League Baseball, is prohibited."   ;)

I took the printed obituary off because the "Find A Grave" link had the same exact obituary plus a picture of Leonard and the cemetery where he rests.  Haha, I kind of get the impression that people would run the other way when they saw Leonard approaching them.  Especially the ones who weren't Yankee fans.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #66 on: July 10, 2016, 11:22:01 PM »
I took the printed obituary off because the "Find A Grave" link had the same exact obituary plus a picture of Leonard and the cemetery where he rests.  Haha, I kind of get the impression that people would run the other way when they saw Leonard approaching them.  Especially the ones who weren't Yankee fans.
There are yankee fans here?  >:(
Kidding. Like yer old post cards n 100 years stuff. Also, they still do in some motels/hotels the postcard but definitely a dying thing for the free ones in the lobby or on your desk. Too bad. I also had to mention thr BB MLB disclaimer because I always found it ridiculous and would joke about it to lawyer friends n relatives. "We cant talk that game" tho I've noticed a few times stipulation changed, maybe during pre-season, where it said local team name and MLB??

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #67 on: July 11, 2016, 04:32:59 PM »
There are yankee fans here?  >:(
Kidding. Like yer old post cards n 100 years stuff. Also, they still do in some motels/hotels the postcard but definitely a dying thing for the free ones in the lobby or on your desk. Too bad. I also had to mention thr BB MLB disclaimer because I always found it ridiculous and would joke about it to lawyer friends n relatives. "We cant talk that game" tho I've noticed a few times stipulation changed, maybe during pre-season, where it said local team name and MLB??

Glad you like the threads, Mr. A.  Always enjoy reading your comments.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #68 on: July 14, 2016, 04:42:12 PM »
This postcard was part of the 1909 Serene Landscapes Series.  It has a 1908-09 Ben Franklin stamp on it, currently worth 40 cents.  Saw one just like it online that looks to be in better shape, down below.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #69 on: July 14, 2016, 07:16:48 PM »

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #70 on: July 17, 2016, 05:46:09 PM »
Another un-mailed Yakima Canutt postcard, this one showing him in a promotional shot for the 1926 silent film, Desert Greed.  Still available on Amazon along with another film Yak starred in called Hellhounds of the Plains.  Desert Greed has Yakima helping out a young girl who is being mistreated by her step father, who wants to force her into a marriage with a dirty, low down lawyer.

I like the bluish tint on this postcard.  Somebody had it posted to a bulletin board or a wall at one time.  The thumb tack hole at the top is easily visible.
   

 

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #71 on: July 17, 2016, 05:48:31 PM »
Here is a quick film clip showing Yakima Canutt's famous stunt from the classic western Stagecoach.



 

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #72 on: July 17, 2016, 05:52:30 PM »

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #73 on: July 17, 2016, 05:57:28 PM »


Haha, trostol.  I've always wanted to have the original smoking cowboy sign.  Set it up in my backyard and plug it in.  It would certainly brighten up the old neighborhood.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #74 on: July 17, 2016, 06:15:55 PM »
Another un-mailed Yakima Canutt postcard, this one showing him in a promotional shot for the 1926 silent film, Desert Greed.  Still available on Amazon along with another film Yak starred in called Hellhounds of the Plains.  Desert Greed has Yakima helping out a young girl who is being mistreated by her step father, who wants to force her into a marriage with a dirty, low down lawyer.

I like the bluish tint on this postcard.  Somebody had it posted to a bulletin board or a wall at one time.  The thumb tack hole at the top is easily visible.
   
Nice, he was an amazing stuntman. Maybe sorta created the position.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #75 on: July 17, 2016, 06:18:10 PM »

Love the Horseshow and Binion was quite a 'character.' Somewhere I have a postcard of the million dollars in cash on display and some robes, mistakenly, taken from suite. (This was post Benny's death, wouldn't want to get on his bad side.)

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #76 on: July 20, 2016, 04:11:09 PM »
I had hoped a message on the back of this postcard would have told us where the folks are real 'friendly' but sadly it's an unused card.  However, the postcard was published in Canyonville, OR., so perhaps there.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #77 on: July 23, 2016, 04:53:30 PM »
A French postcard commemorating World War One (1914 - 1918.)  It has a cancellation date of August 29, 1924.  Also a short, friendly note by someone who was good with a fountain pen.   

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #78 on: July 24, 2016, 08:40:39 PM »
This is a homemade postcard showing the train wreck of the C & N Western out of Chicago.  The wreck occurred on the night of October 8, 1916.  The person who made the postcard gave a detailed account of the wreck so there is no reason for me to say anything more about it.  The message ends with the words, 'I took the picture.' 

Did you notice that the card had no names, addresses or a stamp on it?  Perhaps he/she sent it away in a separate envelope.  Or maybe he/she never intended to use it as a postcard...just made a picture with description on it and filed it away somewhere.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #79 on: July 27, 2016, 04:35:54 PM »
The Oaks Motel, trailer park and restaurant in Brooksville, Floradee (as Gabby Hayes used to call the state.)  I honestly didn't expect the place to be there anymore.  The postcard goes back to the fifties, as the 1954 postal date points out.  But much to my surprise, the motel is still there, though the cabins have probably been modernized throughout the years.  No sign of the restaurant but there is a trailer park out in the back.  I don't think the two are connected anymore. 

That's a 2 cent Thomas Jefferson Liberty Series stamp on the back.  The Liberty Series stamps had presidents and their homes on the stamps and were printed from 1954 to 1968.  The Jefferson stamp is worth 20 cents used and 30 cents new.

Lots of nice trees around the place.  Hate to say it but there seems to be a problem with roaches (the insect kind) and one reviewer wasn't quite sure if the dust in her room was genuine dust or powdered cocaine.  A few people gave it some good reviews though.
 

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #80 on: July 30, 2016, 05:12:04 PM »
Another 'linen' type postcard.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #81 on: July 31, 2016, 07:37:59 PM »
Not an expert, but the dialogue seems oddly phrased. 


Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #82 on: July 31, 2016, 07:49:54 PM »
Not an expert, but the dialogue seems oddly phrased.

It does sound odd but I think it's technically correct.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #83 on: July 31, 2016, 08:03:14 PM »
Not an expert, but the dialogue seems oddly phrased.
Slightly rephrasing and using the "him/he" method to determine I would say this seems to be correct, though it sounds odd. (She is teaching "him" how to swim. "She" is the subject and "him" is the object of the sentence.)

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #84 on: August 03, 2016, 09:53:29 PM »
This postcard sports a Canadian stamp but the front shows a scene from Furness Abbey in Cumbria, England.  I think the card has been sent to 'Ma & all' at the Rocky View Ranch in Alta.  (Short for Alberta?)  Dated January 19, 1913 and it was darn cold...22 below all day.  The kids have colds...small wonder. 

I thought it would be easy to recreate a modern day picture with the postcard pic but I have to admit defeat.  I found a number of arched entranceways that looked similar but nothing matched up on the other side.  I couldn't locate the distinct pathway either and it appears that all the vegetation (except for the grass) has long since been removed.   No printed date info on the card but at least we know that it was made in 1913 or earlier.  I couldn't find a similar postcard online.

Furness Abbey is a cool looking place.  I'd like to see it someday.  Very, very old...we are talking 'built in 1123' here.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furness_Abbey

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #85 on: August 06, 2016, 05:13:03 PM »
Not really a 'favorite' per se but it was in my box of postcards so I'll make an allowance.  These type of 'yokel with sexy women' postcards were somewhat common back in the sixties.  This one was printed by Glacier Stationary Co. of Great Falls, Montana.  I kind of think the company doesn't exist anymore, unless it was morphed into this place...  http://www.yelp.com/biz/glacier-stationers-kalispell

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #86 on: August 06, 2016, 06:11:23 PM »
This postcard sports a Canadian stamp but the front shows a scene from Furness Abbey in Cumbria, England.  I think the card has been sent to 'Ma & all' at the Rocky View Ranch in Alta.  (Short for Alberta?)  Dated January 19, 1913 and it was darn cold...22 below all day.  The kids have colds...small wonder. 

I thought it would be easy to recreate a modern day picture with the postcard pic but I have to admit defeat.  I found a number of arched entranceways that looked similar but nothing matched up on the other side.  I couldn't locate the distinct pathway either and it appears that all the vegetation (except for the grass) has long since been removed.   No printed date info on the card but at least we know that it was made in 1913 or earlier.  I couldn't find a similar postcard online.

Furness Abbey is a cool looking place.  I'd like to see it someday.  Very, very old...we are talking 'built in 1123' here.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furness_Abbey
That Abbey sounds neat. Apparently it hosted large scale Mystery Plays (not like the murder mystery plays but like Shepherd of the Hills and Bible plays.) It also is thought to be haunted.

Both places can get cold but I didn't like Cumbria would get that cold (I could easily see it getting that cold sometimes in Canada.) I'm assuming they would be using Fahrenheit back then?  Or were they already using Celsius? If C then that would only be about -7F which is cold but more believable and common.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #87 on: August 11, 2016, 08:06:01 PM »
I like old restaurant postcards because it's fun to fantasize about going back in time and eating whatever was on the menu back then.  Take the Beachcomber in Clearwater Beach, Florida for instance.  I see by their signs that they offer seafoods, steaks and chicken.  I'll take steak since I'm forbidden to eat it in the real world.

Before any research, the place looks late forties, early fifties in style...which begs the question, if I were to head over there right now, where would I be eating said steak?  In an auto supply store?  A high rise apartment?  A parking garage?  An empty, trash littered lot? 

Well, I looked it up and it looks as though I'll be eating my steak at.....The Beachcomber, in Clearwater Beach Florida!  http://www.heilmansbeachcomber.com/  Only now it's called Bob Heilman's Beachcomber (since 1948.)  If you check the website you will see that the place has been remodeled.  Bob was a cool dude (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Heilman&GSfn=Robert++&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSst=11&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=26435902&df=all&) and his restaurants were a real hit.  He started out with a restaurant in his home state of Ohio (see back of card, above message.) and then he journeyed out to Florida and opened the Beachcomber. 

Now, about the food.  It just so happens that the guy who wrote the message on the card had it in his head to write about the restaurant.  Harry, the writer of the postcard, started out noting that the price has been increased from $2.25 to $2.50.  (Unable to tell if he's bitching about the price, or just noting a simple fact.)  He says that the place got real busy after he and (I'm assuming) his wife were seated.  Here is what he and his wife had for dinner:

One half chicken each
An appetizer
Two bowels of creamed slaw
Two bowels of whipped potatoes
One bowel of chicken gravy
One bowel of apple butter
Another vegetable
Hot rolls and muffins
Two cups of coffee
Wonderful pie 
(Some type of) cream
Strawberry shortcake

Harry sent the postcard from Florida on February 13, 1951.

PS, The steak (Char-Broiled Prime N.Y:12 Ounce Sirloin Strip, & Onion Rings) set me back $44.95, not including the tip.
 

   

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #88 on: August 12, 2016, 07:31:41 AM »


Apparently this is Jackstar's favorite postcard.  Maybe because it's from Russia, I dunno.  The guy is nuttier than a squirrel turd.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #89 on: August 12, 2016, 04:03:28 PM »
Dude vaguely looks like a young Noory.