Author Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.  (Read 7440 times)

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Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #150 on: June 09, 2017, 08:24:40 PM »
This postcard shows two building projects that were built during Huey P. Long's term as Senator of Louisiana.  The cancellation stamp shows the year 1948 or 1949, I can't tell which.


Front of card.


Back of card.


Present day view of the Louisiana State Capitol in Baton Rouge.  By Chrismiceli - Own work, CC0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=23656793


Present day view of the Huey P. Long Bridge (Baton Rouge) over the Mississippi River from northwest, as seen from the west bank. Taken by User:Christopherlin, 2006-04-01.  By No machine-readable author provided. Christopherlin assumed (based on copyright claims). - No machine-readable source provided. Own work assumed (based on copyright claims)., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=676091


Here is another look at Reta Walter's publicity postcard that dates back to 1903.  Reta was an opera singer who was either killed by her lover in 1906 or committed suicide.  I really don't know because there is very little info available on her.


Front of card.


Back of card. 





Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #151 on: June 12, 2017, 11:07:54 PM »
A group of German soldiers are posing atop a wall (or what's left of the side of a building) somewhere in France.  The soldiers are dressed casually and look very relaxed.  I'm guessing that they are behind the lines, resting up before they have to return to the front.  The ruins of the buildings don't look fresh but that doesn't really mean much because a number of towns saw destruction on more than one occasion.  There was a lot of back and forth fighting in World War One.

No message on the back of the postcard but there is a printed by 'so and so' notation that is in German.  Notice the clouds?  That's something you don't see very often on old pictures.  Most cameras back then didn't possess a quick enough exposure to capture cloud formations.  Another item of note is that church steeple in the background.  Looks as though it escaped damage from the heavy guns.


Front of card.


Back of card.


Here is that postcard of the baby and dog.  I have a feeling that this is one of the older postcards in my collection but there is really no way of telling how old it is because sadly, it is yet another unused one.  Is there anyone out there who is an expert on babies clothing?  Perhaps you can date the dress that the baby is wearing. 

I didn't bring this up the first time around, but there is a small (very small, I hope) chance that this baby is dead.  Yeah, a horrific thought, but that is something people used to do way back when.  They would pose their dead babies so that they looked somewhat alive, and the resulting picture would give the family members something to remember them by.  Honestly though, I think that this baby is alive.  It's eyes are closed, yes, but I think that it is a result of the camera shutter being open just a tad too long and it didn't catch the baby with it's eyes open.  The dog looks very relaxed too.  I think it would have been too freaked out to pose like that with a dead baby. 

No message on the back of course, but there is a single, rather cryptic word or name, written in pencil.  Mau? Nau? Nan? Maw (as in Ma?)  A hastily scribbled Nancy?  What do you think?


Front of card.   

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #152 on: June 12, 2017, 11:36:53 PM »

Here is another look at Reta Walter's publicity postcard that dates back to 1903.  Reta was an opera singer who was either killed by her lover in 1906 or committed suicide.  I really don't know because there is very little info available on her.


Front of card.


Back of card.
http://www.ipernity.com/doc/955739/35536963/in/album/711747
Daily Mail is referenced, so you know, but still interesting. The account reads like a theme of some opera!
"‘PRIMA DONNA SHOT.
‘MURDERED BY DISCARDED LOVER
‘ASSASSIN’S SUICIDE.
‘From Berlin on the night of 5th October [1906] the corresponded of the Daily Mail [published in London] wrote:-
‘A few hours before she would have fallen upon the stage of the Opera Comique as Carmen, stabbed to death with the dagger of the jealous Don Jose, the young and beautiful prima donna Fraulein Rita Walter was last night murdered at her home by her discarded lover. Karl August Hesse, who then turned his weapon against himself and fell shot through the heart.
‘Hesse had waited all the afternoon at Fraulein Walter’s house, expecting to surprise her in the company of his rival, Senor Juan Raventos, a young Spanish tenor at the Opera Comique, for whom the prima donna had latterly shown a fondness, and to whom Hesse suspected that she was about to become engaged.
‘Only the fact that the Spaniard was lying in hospital saved his life, as letter left by Hesse indicate that he intended to kill him. Fraulein Walter’s mother was sitting in the adjoining room when her daughter was shot.
‘The singer was only twenty-one years of age, and of remarkable beauty and promising voice. She was the daughter of a well-to-do manufacturer, who died a few years ago. Hesse’s ambition was to be an operatic star himself, but he did not possess the required talent, and this made him exceedingly jealous of his fiancee’s success, as well as of her smiles upon other men. He had several times struck her in the midst of jealous fits.
‘Fraulein Walter attempted repeatedly to induce him to leave her and go his own way, but Hesse claimed to be madly in love with her and refused to be repulsed. The police found in his apartments to-day letters from his Spanish rival wherein the latter had rejected Hesse’s demand that he should break off his relationship with the prima donna. The murderer’s parent are wealthy residents of Hamburg.’
(The Grenfell Record and Lachlan District Advertiser, Grenvell, NSW, Australia, Saturday, 22 December 1906, p. 7g)"


Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #153 on: June 12, 2017, 11:42:17 PM »



Here is that postcard of the baby and dog.  I have a feeling that this is one of the older postcards in my collection but there is really no way of telling how old it is because sadly, it is yet another unused one.  Is there anyone out there who is an expert on babies clothing?  Perhaps you can date the dress that the baby is wearing. 

I didn't bring this up the first time around, but there is a small (very small, I hope) chance that this baby is dead.  Yeah, a horrific thought, but that is something people used to do way back when.  They would pose their dead babies so that they looked somewhat alive, and the resulting picture would give the family members something to remember them by.  Honestly though, I think that this baby is alive.  It's eyes are closed, yes, but I think that it is a result of the camera shutter being open just a tad too long and it didn't catch the baby with it's eyes open.  The dog looks very relaxed too.  I think it would have been too freaked out to pose like that with a dead baby. 

No message on the back of course, but there is a single, rather cryptic word or name, written in pencil.  Mau? Nau? Nan? Maw (as in Ma?)  A hastily scribbled Nancy?  What do you think?


Front of card.   
It is weird. Baby closed eyes yet dog could be still that long and not caught with closed eyes, moving, etc? The dress reminds me of a Christening dress which are sorta of uni-sex and often re-used/handed down etc for many generations as a tradition. Not sure on the messaging or on the other stuff, really. When you zoom it looks "photoshop" but with the old timey cameras, hand tinting, and what not "real" stuff seems fake because we are used to perfected, airbrushed, fake stuff.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #154 on: June 12, 2017, 11:56:08 PM »
http://www.ipernity.com/doc/955739/35536963/in/album/711747
Daily Mail is referenced, so you know, but still interesting. The account reads like a theme of some opera!
"‘PRIMA DONNA SHOT.
‘MURDERED BY DISCARDED LOVER
‘ASSASSIN’S SUICIDE.
‘From Berlin on the night of 5th October [1906] the corresponded of the Daily Mail [published in London] wrote:-
‘A few hours before she would have fallen upon the stage of the Opera Comique as Carmen, stabbed to death with the dagger of the jealous Don Jose, the young and beautiful prima donna Fraulein Rita Walter was last night murdered at her home by her discarded lover. Karl August Hesse, who then turned his weapon against himself and fell shot through the heart.
‘Hesse had waited all the afternoon at Fraulein Walter’s house, expecting to surprise her in the company of his rival, Senor Juan Raventos, a young Spanish tenor at the Opera Comique, for whom the prima donna had latterly shown a fondness, and to whom Hesse suspected that she was about to become engaged.
‘Only the fact that the Spaniard was lying in hospital saved his life, as letter left by Hesse indicate that he intended to kill him. Fraulein Walter’s mother was sitting in the adjoining room when her daughter was shot.
‘The singer was only twenty-one years of age, and of remarkable beauty and promising voice. She was the daughter of a well-to-do manufacturer, who died a few years ago. Hesse’s ambition was to be an operatic star himself, but he did not possess the required talent, and this made him exceedingly jealous of his fiancee’s success, as well as of her smiles upon other men. He had several times struck her in the midst of jealous fits.
‘Fraulein Walter attempted repeatedly to induce him to leave her and go his own way, but Hesse claimed to be madly in love with her and refused to be repulsed. The police found in his apartments to-day letters from his Spanish rival wherein the latter had rejected Hesse’s demand that he should break off his relationship with the prima donna. The murderer’s parent are wealthy residents of Hamburg.’
(The Grenfell Record and Lachlan District Advertiser, Grenvell, NSW, Australia, Saturday, 22 December 1906, p. 7g)"

Thanks for the info.  Looks like the Daily Mail nailed it.  Quite a story and a timeless one.  Something similar could still happen today.  Remember the Dorothy Stratten story?  She was the Playboy Playmate whose husband was jealous, so he killed her, and then himself.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #155 on: June 16, 2017, 12:45:52 AM »
   Gone! Gone! Gone!  The New Pavilion and Dancehall is no more, and has been since the mid 1970s.  This beautiful building, replaced by a condominium sad to say, was once part of the Ocean View Amusement Park in Norfolk, Virginia.  Sounds like quite a place: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocean_View_Amusement_Park  There were five separate rollercoasters there including a big wooden one called The Skyrocket.

  The park was built back at the turn of the century and additional rides were added throughout the years.  But time waits for no man or amusement park, and by 1979 the only thing left there was the Skyrocket.  A movie company bought the structure and made a movie there.  It was called "The Death Of Ocean View Park" starring Mike Connors.  The movie was supposed to end with the rollercoaster being blown up, so the production crew set up a number of gas filled bombs along it's tracks.  A wooden train filled with manikins made a final run on the rollercoaster and the bombs were exploded as it rolled along.  The only trouble was the rollercoaster didn't collapse, much to the delight of onlookers.  So the production crew rigged some more bombs and attached some cables that were pulled by off camera bulldozers.  This time the explosions went off and the rollercoaster collapsed, having been pulled over by the unseen bulldozers.

  I couldn't make out the stamp cancellation date but that 2 cent George Washington stamp was printed from 1922 to 1925.


Front of card.


Back of card.




 Here is the colorful Illuminated Fountain on Lake Ivanhoe at Orlando, Florida.  Like the amusement park, it is gone.  No message on the postcard and I don't know when it was made.  The oldest one I could find online had a cancellation date of 1946.



 
         

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #156 on: June 18, 2017, 08:48:35 PM »
Grandma sent her grandson a real-photo postcard.  It has seen better days, but it has a nice photo of her house, so I will post it.  Cool water pump behind Grandma.  That is a one cent George Washington stamp on the back and it was printed from 1916 to 1917.  See the smooth left side on the stamp?  It was on the left side of the pane (or sheet) of stamps.   

Grandma herself has dated the photo, stating that it was taken on April 20th, 1915.


Front of card.


Back of card.


Here once again is the Lady of Mystery, sitting in a chair.  No info on the back but we can see that she is in a studio becaise of the painted background.  Somebody who is knowledgeable in clothing or hair styles might be able to date the photo.

The back of the card is empty as noted, but look at the space where the stamp goes.  Kind of an interesting grouping of letters there, (behind the pencil mark) but I don't know what they mean. 


Front of card.   

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #157 on: June 22, 2017, 12:06:28 AM »
I think we've got a monastery in Spain here.  The postcard was penned on December 18, 1909, or December 9th, 1918, or perhaps even September 18, 1912.  Beyond that, as Sgt. Shultz used to say, "I know nothing."


Front of card.


Back of card.


Here is a more familiar landscape...London's Westminster Bridge.  This was a Christmas card that someone turned into a birthday card.  Not sure if it was ever sent, though.  I love that silvery sky.  Don't know how old this card is.  I saw one online but it was only described as being '1900s.'


Front of card.





 

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #158 on: June 22, 2017, 11:34:23 PM »
40's Wildwood NJ



Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #159 on: June 24, 2017, 08:09:03 PM »
40's Wildwood NJ



This postcard makes me want a nice juicy hamburger, a bag of buttered popcorn and a big, red candy apple.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #160 on: June 24, 2017, 08:09:49 PM »
These transmission line towers are something else.  Like some kind of robotic monsters.


Front of card.


Back of card,


Library of Congress.  https://www.loc.gov/item/nv0337/


Here is another look at the proposed escalator for the Chicago subway system.


Front of card.


Back of card.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #161 on: June 27, 2017, 08:36:10 PM »
Sunset at the Bay of Porto Belo in the Philippines.  The postcard was sent on May 10, 1944.  There is a three cent Canal Zone stamp on the back.


Front of card.

 
Back of card.


Meanwhile, back in the good old US of A, we take another look at Look Park.  Here is what I wrote about it the first time. 
Quote
Another unused postcard with nothing written on the back.  This one has a picture of Look Park on the front.  'Frank Newhall Look Memorial Park, Florence, Mass.'

Frank Newhall Look was an executive for the Prophylactic Brush Company.  He must have amassed quite a fortune because after his death, his wife, Fannie Burr Look, donated the land that would be a memorial to her late husband.  The park would open in 1930.

Looks (pun intended as RCH would say) to be quite a place.  The old black and white photo appears to be a lake, but actually it's a duck pond.

Look Park info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Look_Park


 

A modern day look at the duck pond.  https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:LookPark_Amphitheater.jpg




 

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #162 on: June 27, 2017, 09:05:49 PM »
These transmission line towers are something else.  Like some kind of robotic monsters.


Front of card.


Back of card,


Library of Congress.  https://www.loc.gov/item/nv0337/



Note in the post card the editing out of chemtrail which appears in the real photograph.  ;)

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #163 on: June 27, 2017, 10:19:51 PM »
Good eye.  Definitely a conspiracy at work there.  Also, most people think that chem-trails are a modern day phenom.  This photo proves otherwise.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #164 on: June 27, 2017, 10:55:53 PM »
Sunset at the Bay of Porto Belo in the Philippines.  The postcard was sent on May 10, 1944.  There is a three cent Canal Zone stamp on the back.


Front of card.

 
Back of card...

This looks like Portobelo in Panama (RP = Republic of Panama?).

Portobelo was where much of the new world silver, and the gold from Peru was shipped to Spain.  Pirates and privateers, including Henry Morgan and Sir Francis Drake, would lurk just outside the bay and attack the Spanish fleet when it got underway, and the city itself was sacked at least a couple of times.  The gold was carried by mules from Peru, then down river by boat to Portobelo.    Drake died of fever here.

 

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #165 on: June 27, 2017, 11:09:59 PM »
This looks like Portobelo in Panama (RP = Republic of Panama?).

Portobelo was where much of the new world silver and the gold from Peru was shipped to Spain (most of the new world silver was shipped to the Philippines, where it was traded for Chinese silk and porcelain, that was shipped from Acapulco).  The gold was carried by mules from Peru, then down river by boat to Portobelo.  Pirates and privateers, including Henry Morgan and Sir Francis Drake would lurk just outside the bay and attack the Spanish fleet when it got underway, and the city itself was sacked at least a couple of times.  Drake died of fever here.

 

Thanks, PB.  You are absolutely right, that's got to be in Panama.  Looks like the scene in the postcard is still there.  Found a photo on Wikipedia.


Portobelo Ruins and bay.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Portobelo_Ruins_and_bay.jpg

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #166 on: June 27, 2017, 11:20:10 PM »
Good eye.  Definitely a conspiracy at work there.  Also, most people think that chem-trails are a modern day phenom.  This photo proves otherwise.
Why do you think the Lone Ranger said Hi-yo Silver away! and wore a face mask? Because of the chemtrails and his blueing of the skin which Hollywood tried to ameliorate by a powder-blue shirt and black and white film. Same thing that happened when people used Art Bell etc "colloidal silver" too much- they turn blue! He was trying to warn us against chemtrails, subtlety, through the Hollywood system of Monarch mind-control (which he broke due his side-kick, a Carlos Castaneda/Robert Ghostwolf/RedElk disciple, Kemo-sabe was a "reverse trigger.") The NWO/Hollywood child sex slave controllers never caught on and allowed their "programming" to be reversed. Hence why guns so popular in the USA now and the NWO can't, yet, take over. He saved several generations.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #167 on: June 30, 2017, 07:54:36 PM »
Here are a couple of what are called 'real photo' postcards.  Burnt buildings, or rather building, because I am thinking that these two postcards are related and are part of a set.  Both backs of these unused postcards are exactly the same and there is a similar white border running along the front of both cards.  Also, the overall tint and quality match.  I can almost see the doorway pillars in the the second postcard, at the far right of the postcard on top.  That postcard on top looks very hot and smokey.






I think we should take a nice dip after viewing that hot, burnt building.  How about we go to the swimming pool at the Frank Newhall Look Park in Florence, Mass?  This postcard should have gone with the above Look Park duck pond but I just never looked at the two postcards as being a set.  I believe that they have done away with the pool but a splash pool has been installed for the kids. 



Here is a small photo of Frank Newhall Look that I found here: https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=27682858

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #168 on: June 30, 2017, 11:01:09 PM »

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #169 on: July 04, 2017, 07:42:59 PM »
Here is a repeat showing of a postcard that I showed last Fourth of July.  It shows the late great Western Movie stuntman Yakima Canutt performing at the Ashland - Rogue River Roundup in Ashland, Oregon on July 3rd, 4th or 5th.  Not sure which date the photo was taken on because there is no stamp cancellation date and no stamp for that matter so I guess it was never sent through the mail.  Somebody did write the dates that Yakima performed and for that I am thankful.  The year was 1917.




Here is a card from a silent movie that Yakima starred in back in 1926.  It was called Desert Greed and it can still be found on Amazon.  The movie has Yakima helping out a young girl who is being mistreated by her step father, who wants to force her into a marriage with a dirty, low down (not to mention nefarious) lawyer.

This was another non post-ally used postcard.  If you look close you can see a hole where somebody had it tacked to a wall or something.







 

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #170 on: July 07, 2017, 08:54:36 PM »
How about a drink at the Gaslight Lounge?  This postcard was sent back in 1968 and it is part of a set that highlights one of the fun activities that one can find at Fernwood, a quality resort in the Pocono mountains of Pennsylvania.  There are quite a few pictures of Fernwood both past and present online and they show people swimming, fishing, playing tennis and golf.  Drinking too and that's where the Gaslight Lounge comes into play.  Or rather out of play.  It looks as though the Gaslight is no more, though there is still a fairly big lounge to be found at Fernwood, but it doesn't have a name.  I think the proprietors refer to it as 'our' lounge or 'the' lounge.  But who knows, it might be the actual Gaslight Lounge done up differently or remodeled.


Front of card.


Back of card.


Or how about a cocktail in the clouds?  Here is what I wrote about Stouffer's in Chicago:
Quote
These people are enjoying "cocktails in the clouds" at Stouffer's "TOP OF THE Rock" atop the Prudential Building, Chicago, Illinois.  When I first saw this postcard I thought it was the Seattle Space Needle but a quick glance at the post mark date told me otherwise.  (The date, September 1958, would be too early for it to be the Space Needle which was built in 1962.)

Information on the back of the card says that on a clear day you'll see way beyond Chicago...to Michigan, Indiana and Wisconsin. The Prudential Building itself opened in 1955.  There was (is?) an observation deck at the very top and the restaurant was the next floor down from that.  Top of the Rock started out as a lounge (drinks were a dollar) and later became a restaurant.  It closed in 1976.
I found another postcard online that shows Top of the Rock when it became a restaurant.  (At bottom.)


Front of card.


Back of card.





Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #171 on: July 10, 2017, 05:13:03 PM »
These postcards are typical of the ones that portray young couples in love.  Very common throughout the early 1900s. The second one is a repeat showing from an earlier posting.


Front of card.


Back of card.



Front of card.


Back of card.
 

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #172 on: July 13, 2017, 08:31:30 PM »
A postcard from Nassau in the Bahamas, circa 1960. 


Front of card.


Back of card.


Another ocean scene but this one is a bit hotter.  Mt. Vesuvius and the postcard was sent on August 27, 1906.  I like how the person noted that 'a little smoke was coming from it now.'

 
Front of card.


Back of card.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #173 on: July 16, 2017, 09:23:56 PM »
I wish I had more restaurant postcards.  Definitely one of my favorite categories.  There is a seller on ebay who has one big postcard auction every Sunday.  I should check it out for restaurant postcards but I keep forgetting.  By the time I remember about the auction, it's over.

Fritzel's, an eatery in Chicago looked like a cool place to eat.  I say 'looked' because the place closed back in the 1970's.  It started up sometime after WWII and it had quite the celebrity clientele.  Phyllis Diller, Tony Bennett and the like used to eat there.  Sports figures too.  Joe DiMaggio and Marilyn used to go there often and Mickey Mantle and Yogi Berra too.  Not to mention politicians like Mayor Richard J. Daley.

I guess it was the great food that brought these people in.  Plus everyone seemed to love the part owner that ran the place, a fellow by the name of Joe Jacobson.  But enough from me, here's a link to an article that describes the place.  http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1986-04-20/features/8601280625_1_nancy-jacobson-restaurant-meat-cutter

Interestingly, there is another Fritzel's in Lake Zurich, Illinois and they specialize in Austrian and German cuisine.  I bet there is a connection between the old and new restaurants but I couldn't find one online.  The new place looks really nice.  Let's try the Rouladen of Beef which consists of beef steak rolled around bacon, onion, pickle, mustard and spices.  That will be $20.95...each.  Here is their website: http://fritzl.com/


Front of card.


Back of card.


This postcard always makes me hungry.  Original Barbecue started up back in 1936 in Los Angeles.  I looked the address up on Google and there is a modern office building there now.  Unless they have moved the place, the Original Barbecue is long, long gone.


Front of card.


Back of card.


   

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #174 on: July 19, 2017, 06:21:13 PM »
This interesting postcard from World War One shows a group of German soldiers posing before a burning building.  There are two words in the upper right hand corner that say Brennende Fabrik, which translates as Brennende Factory, so there you have it.  I couldn't find any more info on it.  There are some printed words on the back of the card and they appear to state that the image has been 'Militarily censored and admitted to traffic.'


Front of card.


Printed words on back of card.


This second card has seen better days, but as I wrote about it last year...

Quote
  Not surprising when you consider that it goes back to 1918, and was most likely written in Germany during World War One.  There is a message on the back but I couldn't decipher it.  Just couldn't comprehend the writer's penmanship.  I did better on the front.  Oddly enough, it appears to be a birthday card.  "Best regards and wishes for a happy birthday.'  Sure doesn't look very 'birthday' in nature now, does it?  I couldn't find a name or address on the back either.  I believe that the date is April 28, 1918.  Still almost seven more months of war to go.   

I'd still like a person, or better yet, a teacher who was proficient in speaking German to decipher the written part of the message.  It would make a nice class project, I'm thinking.


Front of card.


Back of card.