Author One Hundred Years Ago  (Read 250921 times)

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Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5490 on: July 13, 2017, 05:08:20 PM »
Two of the girls died young and were canonized recently and I think the 3rd lived longer but in some strict convent so nobody could talk or interview her. Not sure the 3rd girl who lived longer wasn't also canonized. Sort of strange? Of course, as we here all know, Father Martin knew the "real" 3rd secret and he told Art but only when Art promised never to reveal it. After Father Martin's death murder Art still wouldn't reveal it.

I wonder if Art could at least verify that what the Cardinal said about the third secret was true or not without violating his pledge of not revealing the secret?  Probably not.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5491 on: July 14, 2017, 04:31:41 AM »
Newspaper cartoons from the Library of Congress.  July 14, 1917.

The Bismarck Tribune


The Daily Commonwealth


The Evening Star


Free Trader Journal


Amarillo Daily News


New York Tribune

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5492 on: July 14, 2017, 02:28:32 PM »
From the Library of Congress.


Auto wreck, 1917.
https://www.loc.gov/item/npc2008011480/


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5493 on: July 14, 2017, 03:01:40 PM »
One hundred year old photos from the Imperial War Museums.


Quote
Plotting reference: 36C H 34cd N 4 Central 5a. Key feature:
  http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205374640


Quote
British soldiers and men of the Chinese Labour Corps working in the timber yard at Caestre preparing wood for railway construction, 14 July 1917.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205237961


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A cook of the Chinese Labour Corps Camp at work in Caestre, 14 July 1917.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205227675


Quote
Men of the Chinese Labour Corps in their camp at Caestre with loaves of special bread made in their own bakeries, 14 July 1917.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205237955


Quote
King George V on arrival at Calais to embark for England, 14th July 1917.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205078991


Quote
King George V and Queen Mary of Teck embarking at Calais for England, 14th July 1917.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205078992


Quote
Private Robert Gabriel 34209. Unit: 1st Battalion, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. Death: 14 July 1917, Newport, Western Front.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205295183

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5494 on: July 14, 2017, 03:03:26 PM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5495 on: July 15, 2017, 03:55:36 PM »
One hundred year old photos from the Imperial War Museums.


Quote
Plotting reference: 51B O 20. Key feature: Fressain.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205374643


Quote
Ruined principal street of Lievin, 15 July 1917.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323250


Quote
Lance Corporal Edward Hunt Paten 5101A. Unit: 49th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Death: 15 July 1917 Western Front
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205386848

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5496 on: July 15, 2017, 03:57:32 PM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5497 on: July 15, 2017, 03:59:30 PM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5498 on: July 16, 2017, 03:51:00 PM »
One hundred year old photos from the Imperial War Museums.


Quote
Plotting reference: 28H 1b Key feature: N of Red Rose Camp.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205231141


Quote
General view of ruined Chaulnes, 16 June 1917. Chaulnes is a junction of the paris-cambrai railway and became exposed to Allied fire from three directions in September 1916.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323695


Quote
British troops and civilians in the Town Square of Bethune, 16 July 1917.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323254


Quote
Bombardier Reginald J. Fitzjohn L/28849. Unit: 55th Battery, 33rd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Death: 16 July 1917, Western Front.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205294750

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5499 on: July 16, 2017, 03:52:32 PM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5500 on: July 17, 2017, 03:54:38 AM »
The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, July 17, 1917.  (The Library of Congress)

BERNARD McQUILLAN DIES AT RIPE OLD AGE

  As placid as the close of a summer day Bernard McQuillan's life terminuted last evening in the twilight of life and as calmly as the life had been spent in doing good and helping others. The end came at 4:00 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. D. J. Robb, following two weeks of marked decline which presaged early dissolution. Old age was the cause, the strain of eighty six years of active frontier existence having exhausted the vitality and left but a frail shadow of manhood to tell of the early days of Nevada in whose making the deceased was an active factor. For fifteen years Mr. McQuillan had been a resident of Tonopah and enjoyed the experience of witnessing the growth of the third big mining camp with which he had been identified.

  Deceased was the father of two sons arid three daughters, one of the latter having died. The survivors are James J. McQuillan, the postmaster, John S. McQuillan, Mrs. D. J. Robb and Mrs. W. J. Douglass, all of Tonopah. Mr. McQuillan was born in Carickmacross, County Monaghan, Ireland in 1831 and emigrated to New York when he was 21 years of age to make his home with his sister. Not relishing the east and endowed with a spirit of adventure the young immigrant moved to Wisconsin where he remained until Just prior to the civil war when he joined the vast throng gravitating to the shores of the Pacific.

  He made the journey by way of the Isthmus of Panama and, on arriving at San Francisco, went directly to the diggings which were drawing thousands from every quarter of the universe. In this way he became familiar with mining and spent many years in the placers which rewarded him with a neat competence. At the age of 32 he married in Placerville and removed to San Francisco until the fame of the new Comstock lode tempted him from the city's environment and caused him to establish his home in Virginia City where his family was reared. Mr. McQuillan was a pioneer of Virginia City and enjoyed a personal acquaintance with all the bonanza kings and saw all the big deals of the Comstock executed. In 1896 he left the Comstock for Grass Valley where he remained but a short time before he was drawn to Southern Nevada by the silver boom which took him to Silver Star, a camp in Esmeralda county, that was then at its zenith. Once more the lure of the mines called and be came to Tonopah in 1902 and finished his varied career in the arms of his family.

  The funeral will take place tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock when solemn requiem mass will be celebrated at St. Patrick's church by Reverend Father Diss. Interment will take place in the local cemetery. Friends are requested to omit flowers.


INDIAN RANCHER TAKES A BRIDE

  Coony Clifford, a young Shoshone Indian, was married last evening by Justice Dunseath to Miss Daisy Jagles, daughter of a ranchman in the northern end of the county. The wedding is the culmination of a romance of the desert and marks the development of the bridegroom to man's estate. He was adopted into the family of the late Edward Clifford after he was picked up on the desert one fierce winter's night and taken to Stone Cabin where be was given every attention that the rescuers could devote to one of their own sons. Nothing was ever heard of the parents of the young waif who remained in his new home and was reared with every attention so that he acquired a good education and soon began to look out for himself by gathering together a bunch of cattle which grew and thrived. The boy and his bride are well known to every resident of the county and will receive congratulations.


HEARTLESS WRETCHES DESPOIL GARDEN

  Down on Knapp Avenue near the sub-station of the power company a young housekeeper had a flower garden that was the equal of anything in more favored lands. Rose bushes climbed over the porches and the fences were concealed by a profusion of vines while the yard was filled with a choice assortment of blooms. The work of raising such a crop in the desert was all the reward the lady received for she took pride in her performance and was happy in accepting the compliments of all who saw the pretty garden. The beauty of the picture, did not appeal to some vandals, apparently, for recently somebody entered and stole most of the blooms and causing much damage that the rose bushes were almost destroyed.


FIRST RAIN IN SIX WEEKS LAST NIGHT

  The first sign of moisture in over forty days was evident yesterday afternoon when with the roar of thunder and flashing of lightning the precious drops began to patter to earth. Then the Pluvian God laid off the job and resumed at 11 o'clock with a shower that threatened to continue for some time. This lasted exactly three minutes and then all was still. The results of all this agitation was five one hundredths of precipitation, but the relief was appreciated.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5501 on: July 17, 2017, 02:57:18 PM »
Phyllis Diller was born on July 17, 1917. 

Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phyllis_Diller


Phyllis Diller. Picture taken at the her home in Brentwood, Los Angeles, Southern California.  This photo was taken on February 25, 2007 by Brian Hamilton, at the home of Phyllis Diller in Brentwood, California, USA.  Public Domain.  https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Phyllis_diller_2-25-2007.jpg

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5502 on: July 17, 2017, 03:27:10 PM »
A double header at the Chicago White Sox's Comiskey Park on July 17, 1917.  The visiting Washington Senators were clobbered in the first game, 5 to 0.  Eddie Cicotte pitched a one hitter, much to the delight of the crowd.  https://www.reddit.com/r/whitesox/comments/6nu8or/july_17_1917_game_1_eddie_cicotte_1_hits_the/?st=j58kw5u6&sh=97828e2c

Quote
When Eddie got the last out the applause from 10,000 White Sox fans was so cheerful that Eddie came out for a curtain call.


1919 photograph of Eddie Cicotte.  Public Domain.  https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:EddieCicotte55.jpg

Game 2 was much more exciting and would have been a great one to watch.  Tied 2 to 2 after the 9th inning and it took two more to get a winner.  The Sox took it, 3 to 2 thanks to a hit by White Sox second baseman Eddie Collins.  https://www.reddit.com/r/whitesox/comments/6nujck/july_17_1917_game_2_white_sox_walk_off_walter/?st=j58lb6i3&sh=0acfb324


Eddie Collins. Public Domain.  https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Eddie_Collins_1911.jpg



Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5503 on: July 17, 2017, 03:33:15 PM »
The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, July 17, 1917.  (The Library of Congress)

BERNARD McQUILLAN DIES AT RIPE OLD AGE

  As placid as the close of a summer day Bernard McQuillan's life terminuted last evening in the twilight of life and as calmly as the life had been spent in doing good and helping others. The end came at 4:00 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. D. J. Robb, following two weeks of marked decline which presaged early dissolution. Old age was the cause, the strain of eighty six years of active frontier existence having exhausted the vitality and left but a frail shadow of manhood to tell of the early days of Nevada in whose making the deceased was an active factor. For fifteen years Mr. McQuillan had been a resident of Tonopah and enjoyed the experience of witnessing the growth of the third big mining camp with which he had been identified.

  Deceased was the father of two sons arid three daughters, one of the latter having died. The survivors are James J. McQuillan, the postmaster, John S. McQuillan, Mrs. D. J. Robb and Mrs. W. J. Douglass, all of Tonopah. Mr. McQuillan was born in Carickmacross, County Monaghan, Ireland in 1831 and emigrated to New York when he was 21 years of age to make his home with his sister. Not relishing the east and endowed with a spirit of adventure the young immigrant moved to Wisconsin where he remained until Just prior to the civil war when he joined the vast throng gravitating to the shores of the Pacific.

  He made the journey by way of the Isthmus of Panama and, on arriving at San Francisco, went directly to the diggings which were drawing thousands from every quarter of the universe. In this way he became familiar with mining and spent many years in the placers which rewarded him with a neat competence. At the age of 32 he married in Placerville and removed to San Francisco until the fame of the new Comstock lode tempted him from the city's environment and caused him to establish his home in Virginia City where his family was reared. Mr. McQuillan was a pioneer of Virginia City and enjoyed a personal acquaintance with all the bonanza kings and saw all the big deals of the Comstock executed. In 1896 he left the Comstock for Grass Valley where he remained but a short time before he was drawn to Southern Nevada by the silver boom which took him to Silver Star, a camp in Esmeralda county, that was then at its zenith. Once more the lure of the mines called and be came to Tonopah in 1902 and finished his varied career in the arms of his family.

  The funeral will take place tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock when solemn requiem mass will be celebrated at St. Patrick's church by Reverend Father Diss. Interment will take place in the local cemetery. Friends are requested to omit flowers.


INDIAN RANCHER TAKES A BRIDE

  Coony Clifford, a young Shoshone Indian, was married last evening by Justice Dunseath to Miss Daisy Jagles, daughter of a ranchman in the northern end of the county. The wedding is the culmination of a romance of the desert and marks the development of the bridegroom to man's estate. He was adopted into the family of the late Edward Clifford after he was picked up on the desert one fierce winter's night and taken to Stone Cabin where be was given every attention that the rescuers could devote to one of their own sons. Nothing was ever heard of the parents of the young waif who remained in his new home and was reared with every attention so that he acquired a good education and soon began to look out for himself by gathering together a bunch of cattle which grew and thrived. The boy and his bride are well known to every resident of the county and will receive congratulations.


HEARTLESS WRETCHES DESPOIL GARDEN

  Down on Knapp Avenue near the sub-station of the power company a young housekeeper had a flower garden that was the equal of anything in more favored lands. Rose bushes climbed over the porches and the fences were concealed by a profusion of vines while the yard was filled with a choice assortment of blooms. The work of raising such a crop in the desert was all the reward the lady received for she took pride in her performance and was happy in accepting the compliments of all who saw the pretty garden. The beauty of the picture, did not appeal to some vandals, apparently, for recently somebody entered and stole most of the blooms and causing much damage that the rose bushes were almost destroyed.


FIRST RAIN IN SIX WEEKS LAST NIGHT

  The first sign of moisture in over forty days was evident yesterday afternoon when with the roar of thunder and flashing of lightning the precious drops began to patter to earth. Then the Pluvian God laid off the job and resumed at 11 o'clock with a shower that threatened to continue for some time. This lasted exactly three minutes and then all was still. The results of all this agitation was five one hundredths of precipitation, but the relief was appreciated.

"Friends are requested to omit flowers." I thought this was a modern phenomena but I guess not!

I hope the marriage worked out and lady gets her roses back in order and the culprit caught!

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5504 on: July 17, 2017, 03:39:48 PM »
"Friends are requested to omit flowers." I thought this was a modern phenomena but I guess not!

I hope the marriage worked out and lady gets her roses back in order and the culprit caught!

Yeah, I hope the vandal got caught, too.  Hard to picture what the lady had in the way of a house, but it is the desert after all.  Wouldn't there have been footprints in the sand? 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5505 on: July 17, 2017, 03:42:52 PM »
A French soldier amuses his comrades with a pole trick.  I guess it's as good a way as any to pass the time during a war.  https://www.reddit.com/r/100yearsago/comments/6nodf5/july_15_1917_acrobatic_soldier_amuses_his/?st=j58lx1s3&sh=6bc3a1f3

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5506 on: July 17, 2017, 03:43:11 PM »
Yeah, I hope the vandal got caught, too.  Hard to picture what the lady had in the way of a house, but it is the desert after all.  Wouldn't there have been footprints in the sand?
At least the flowers won't be used for Bernard McQuillan's funeral. But the police should be on the look-out. I would think that lots of flowers aren't the norm for the town and would stand out.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5507 on: July 17, 2017, 03:45:17 PM »
A French soldier amuses his comrades with a pole trick.  I guess it's as good a way as any to pass the time during a war.  https://www.reddit.com/r/100yearsago/comments/6nodf5/july_15_1917_acrobatic_soldier_amuses_his/?st=j58lx1s3&sh=6bc3a1f3
He should run off and join a sideshow. That is some weird flexibility there.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5508 on: July 17, 2017, 03:48:36 PM »
At least the flowers won't be used for Bernard McQuillan's funeral. But the police should be on the look-out. I would think that lots of flowers aren't the norm for the town and would stand out.

Ha ha, very true, they would stand out.  It must have been hard to grow plants, especially with a typical rainfall of five one hundredths of an inch.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5509 on: July 17, 2017, 03:56:17 PM »
Ha ha, very true, they would stand out.  It must have been hard to grow plants, especially with a typical rainfall of five one hundredths of precipitation.
I'm not sure on Tonopah but there are sometimes aquifers and artesian wells even in desert areas so maybe they could get water from them? I know Pahrump was initially famous for theirs.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5510 on: July 17, 2017, 04:28:09 PM »
One hundred year old photos from the Imperial War Museums.


Quote
Plotting reference: 28C 19ab Key feature: Canal, Highland & Spahi Farms.
(All those splotches down there are bomb craters.)
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205232084


Quote
A British dispatch rider with his motorcycle in a ruined street of Souchez, 17 July 1917.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323255


Quote
An advanced dressing station under a ruined house at Ecoust-Saint-Mein, 17 July 1917. The Royal Army Medical Corps Captain, decorated with a Military Cross, and an officer of The Gordon Highlanders are seen in the foreground.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205237801


Quote
Army Service Corps men cutting and collecting clover for transport horses, near Arras, 17 July 1917.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205237797


Quote
Commander Fitzroy Henry Hall. Unit: HMS Newmarket, Royal Navy. Death: 17 July 1917, killed in action at sea. Commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205300505




33 Years Ago
« Reply #5512 on: July 17, 2017, 06:23:21 PM »
http://www.nytimes.com/1984/07/18/us/reagan-signs-law-linking-federal-aid-to-drinking-age.html
Reagan decided that under 21 year olds shouldn't be able to buy alcoholic beverages, contrary to common-sense and most all other countries.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5513 on: July 17, 2017, 06:24:46 PM »
Excellent, and timely post, Rix.  Thank you. ;)

And thank you Starr, for being a valued reader of the 100 years ago thread. :)

Re: 33 Years Ago
« Reply #5514 on: July 17, 2017, 06:32:32 PM »
http://www.nytimes.com/1984/07/18/us/reagan-signs-law-linking-federal-aid-to-drinking-age.html
Reagan decided that under 21 year olds shouldn't be able to buy alcoholic beverages, contrary to common-sense and most all other countries.

Ha, I don't remember that one.  I wonder how the law would eventually shake down?

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5515 on: July 17, 2017, 06:34:25 PM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5516 on: July 17, 2017, 06:38:02 PM »
Excellent, and timely post, Rix.  Thank you. ;)

Rix Gins is the man! 8) ...and an excellent researcher to boot.  :D  This thread has been a perfect ingredient to balance the recipe that is BellGab.  ;)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5517 on: July 17, 2017, 07:28:22 PM »
Rix Gins is the man! 8) ...and an excellent researcher to boot.  :D  This thread has been a perfect ingredient to balance the recipe that is BellGab.  ;)

Well thanks, Shay.  What a nice thing to say and I appreciate it.  Glad to have you aboard the 100 years ago thread.  :)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5518 on: July 17, 2017, 09:55:45 PM »
Rix Gins is the man! 8) ...and an excellent researcher to boot.  :D  This thread has been a perfect ingredient to balance the recipe that is BellGab.  ;)
Yes, it is. ;)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5519 on: July 18, 2017, 03:35:39 AM »
Newspaper cartoons from the Library of Congress, July 18, 1917.

The Evening Star


The Commonwealth


The Washington Herald


The Free Trader Journal


The Washington Times


The Bismarck Tribune


The West Virginian