Author One Hundred Years Ago  (Read 230716 times)

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Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5130 on: April 18, 2017, 05:52:19 PM »
Fun, indeed.  Now that is one cool remembrance there, Pye.  One thing I forgot to mention in my earlier comment was in regards to how nice it must have smelled inside the organ's control room.  All of that old, custom cut wood and wiring, all packed together in there.  It must have smelled really good.

There is some truth to that- wood is organic and they probably treated it with waxes and oils to prevent cracking. I am told that old electronics equipment pre 1980s had a particular odor- sort of a 'hot metal' like vacuum tube equipment.

I should ask Mr. Pye- he is working on a vintage 1970s Kennwood AM/FM tuner. I had no idea that sniffing old stereo equipment was a thing- the more you know.  ;D

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5131 on: April 19, 2017, 03:37:08 AM »
Everett True, April 19, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5132 on: April 19, 2017, 03:38:10 AM »
The Chicago Day Book, April 19, 1917.

NEWS OF THE DAY CONCERNING CHICAGO
 
Albert Zubalit, 8, 534 N. Lawndale av., hit by street car. Skull fractured.

Edgar Stephens, 6, Metropolis, III., pulled Tom Colburn, Jr., 7, from water when he fell in.

Four boys arrested with son of Police Capt. Healy for stealing autos fined $200 each. Young Healy was paroled. 

Jas. Piatt, 10, 743 N. Cicero av., shot and killed while playing "wild west" with Alvedo Connelly, 9, 749 N. Cicero av.
 
Jas. Murray, 19, 5641 5. May, escaped from Juvenile detention home and then robbed two stores, according to police.
 


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5133 on: April 19, 2017, 03:39:02 AM »
The Tacoma Times, April 19, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5134 on: April 19, 2017, 05:06:30 PM »
April 19, 1917 marked the end of the Second Battle of Gaza that had started two days earlier.  Fairly long article in the link below so suffice to say, the British and Australian troops were handed their asses in hand baskets by Turkish troops.  It's too bad there was even a second battle in the first place because British forces had all but overrun the place back in March.  The head honcho for the British forces had got cold feet though and he pulled all his forces back. (He got worried that his forces were being encircled in the fog.)  The Turks easily reclaimed their lost territory.  Thus, this second battle was necessary.

There would be an additional battle the following October with more favorable results for the Egyptian Expeditionary Force.  General Edmund Henry Hynman Allenby would be at the helm for that battle.

Link to the Second Battle of Gaza: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Battle_of_Gaza


Ottoman soldiers with some of them armed with MG 08s.  By American Colony Jerusalem - Library of Congress[1], Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5863098



 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5135 on: April 20, 2017, 03:52:34 AM »
Everett True, April 20, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5136 on: April 20, 2017, 04:07:05 AM »
The Chicago Day Book, April 20, 1917.

NEWS OF THE DAY CONCERNING CHICAGO

Mary O'Brien, 1016 Leland av., fined $1 for spitting in face of Policeman Patrick J. Hart.

Judge Stelk ordered Jos. Vorsak to stop playing accordion all night and give his wife chance to sleep.

Stephan Leacock says Shakespeare was '"literary thief."

Bomb exploded under home of Nicholas Delgenio, 2639 Huron. Two families thrown from beds. $200 loss.

Frank Kaltac indicted for beating son, Karl, 9, because he bought food with 10 cents father gave him for beer.

Hvman Galowich, professional bondsman, found guilty of swindling woman of $200 on promise to "fix" a case.

Ceo. Gunn, "boy caveman," fined $100. Edna Barber, 15, with whom he had been living, turned over to juvenile court.

Policeman Wm. J. Milan faces trial by civil service board. Got drunk, says his superiors, and arrested nearly everyone he saw.

Six armed men in auto bound and gagged three employees of Union Dairy Co., 835 So. Hermitage av., and blew safe. It was empty. If they had waited a few hours $6,000 would have been in safe.

Hazel James, 1343 Adam, got divorce from Patrick James. Said he once drank mixture of gasoline, ether and whisky.

Forty hobos arrested in West Madison street cleanup.

Dave Montgomery's condition worse. In coma. Slight hope for recovery.


1897 poster for the Montgomery and Stone blackface minstrel act.  By Unknown - Fields, Armond (22 January 2002) Fred Stone: Circus Performer and Musical Comedy Star, McFarland, p. 60 ISBN: 978-0-7864-1161-0., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=32794713


LOCAL WAR NEWS

U. S. army ordered 800,000 lbs. of bacon from Armour & Co.

Mrs. Jennie Long, 80, nurse in civil war, would join Red Cross.

Jackie's at Great Lakes station swamped with letters from fair sex.

Richard Connoly, Waukegan, is on destroyer Smith, fired on by U-boat.

Chicago was asked to furnish 1,800 recruits by tonight. Not quite 600 is the result.

Every sheep raiser asked to contribute "two fleeces of wool" to army for clothing.

Twenty Oak Park girls will assist Ensign George Weichelt in recruiting in Oak Park.

First infantry has obtained badly needed horseshoers by going directly to Horseshoers' union.

Auto disappeared from in front of First infantry armory. Four officers and private missing. Believed gone for "joy ride."

Gregorio Inquandi, Italian, 425 W. Oak, beaten to death by five men because he cheered America.  Rugmar Lundstrom, 1910 N. Cicero av.; Geo. Freeman, 2305 N. Keeler av.; James Flaghight, Harry Czansski and Frank Rose held.


BOXING
 
  The sun of Ritchie Mitchell's lightweight championship aspirations set in Milwaukee last night, Benny Leonard pushing the Cream City man off the horizon in the seventh round with a stiff left and right cross. Leonard was superior to Mitchell all the way. In the second he scored two knockdowns, and from then on seemed to be working under wraps, confident of his ability to whip over the final punch whenever he desired.
  Mitchell rallied gamely after the, second, but could not stand under the terrific punishment handed him. The two punches in the seventh sent him down for nine. When he arose Leonard battered him all over the ring, his knees sagged and he was leaning on the ropes for support when the referee stopped the fight.
  It was a clean and impressive victory for the New Yorker.

Photo of Benny Leonard: http://www.bestboxingblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/benny-leonard-1.jpg

 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5137 on: April 20, 2017, 04:07:41 AM »
The Tacoma Times, April 20, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5138 on: April 20, 2017, 04:05:03 PM »
The US Navy's first airship, the DN-1 took its first test flight on April 20, 1917.  As cool as it looks in the photo below, the DN-1 was an abysmal failure.  The Wikimedia article states that...
Quote
The DN-1 was an inept failure, being barely capable of flight, delivered long after the planned time, and way over budget. The DN-1 made the Navy realize it did not have the technical skills and knowledge needed to construct airships.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DN-1


DN-1 approaching its floating hangar at Pensacola.  Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2434761

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5139 on: April 21, 2017, 03:26:33 AM »
The Evening Star, April 21, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5140 on: April 21, 2017, 03:30:20 AM »
The Chicago Day Book, April 21, 1917.

NEWS OF THE DAY CONCERNING CHICAGO
 
Mrs. Wm. Hale Thompson's pet canary got loose yesterday. Caught by policeman.

Charles Henry Moore got divorce from Charlotte Willey Moore. Treated him "roughly," he said.

Ford Fisher wrote Mrs. Esther Fisher, 554 E. 92d, he "married a doctor bill." She got divorce.

Carl Urquhart, 915 State, who once deserted army, arrested for deserting wife. Ordered to support her.

Chas. Reeble, 2420 Ballou, suicide. Gun. Wife left him. Wrote note advising men to join army rather than marry.

Sebastian Klinek, 850 N. Kildare av., fled from American hospital in nightshirt. Caught by police. Was taking drink cure.
 
Victor Lowitzke, 1540 Emma, employee Chicago Rawhide Mfg. Co., stepped on wet floor while carrying electric light extension cord. Electrocuted.

Wm. Hanley, struck landlad, Mrs. Golga, Evanston, with icepick. Serious condition. He was going to jump in canal, but water was too cold. Arrested.

While 2 auto bandits were lining up J. P. Davis, saloonkeeper, 1241 Wabash av., his wife and eight customers, Ralph Adamson, bartender, "saved the bacon" by sneaking out with $1,500. Robbers only got $S0.



A WORLD OF LAUGHERS MOURN THE LOSS OF DAVE TODAY

  The man who can make the nation laugh until its sides ache is worth while; we need him. That is why the nation today is mourning the loss of Dave Montgomery, famous comedian partner of Fred Stone. Dave died last night at the Presbyterian hospital after several weeks of game fighting for life.
  His real name was David Craig Montgomery but that does not matter we all knew him as just plain Dave, or as the tinman in the "Wizard of Oz," Solomon Scarlet in "The Girl From Up There," or Kid Connor in "The Red Mill." He was also popular as a co-star with Stone in "The Old Town," with Elsie Janis and Stone in "The Lady of the Slipper," and their latest triumph, "Chin Chin."
  Dave was taken sick while appearing in Chicago in "Chin Chin." His partner, Stone, cut the tour of the play in Montreal short to come and be with Dave in his last hour.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_C._Montgomery


Montgomery as Punks, Janis as Cinderella and Stone as Spooks in The Lady of the Slipper 1912.  By Charles Dillingham - https://footlightnotes.wordpress.com/2013/01/page/5/, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=32790464

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5141 on: April 21, 2017, 03:34:51 AM »
The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, April 21, 1917.


DESERTER TOO TIRED OF WAITING FOR ARREST DECIDES TO SURRENDER AND TAKE MEDICINE

  A man named Hendricks called at the U. S. recruiting office last Thursday and informed the officer in charge that he had deserted from the Marine Corps and was anxious to get back and take his penalty. He said he had been doing nothing but walking and tramping around the country dodging men whom he thought were on his trail and he was tired of remaining in that state of mind. Yesterday morning an officer from San Francisco called  and took the culprit back with him. Hendricks had been in Tonopah ten days.


GYPSY PALMIST
 
  Madam, the gypsy palmist, the only one of her tribe left, may be found at her rooms on Bryan avenue, opposite the Brann house. Whatever your trouble may be she can help you. Call and see her at once. She will remain but a short time. Satisfaction or no pay. Adv.A21t6.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5142 on: April 21, 2017, 03:35:30 AM »
The Tacoma Times, April 21, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5143 on: April 21, 2017, 03:44:10 PM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5144 on: April 23, 2017, 03:24:05 AM »
Everett True, April 23, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5145 on: April 23, 2017, 03:27:31 AM »
The Chicago Day Book, April 23, 1917.

NEWS OF THE DAY CONCERNING CHICAGO
 
Mayor urges Chicagoans to clean up this week.   

Ceo. Davis, 3257 Rhodes, colored, arrested for holdup of Max Robbins, 4707 Calumet av.

Screams of women routed colored burglar from home of Peter G. Rapp, 4336 Sheridan rd.

Mrs. Lillian Washington, colored, 37 W. 51st, punched Policeman Johu. E. Wade, colored, when he arrested her for disorderly conduct.

Walter Jones, 329 N. Oakley blvd, found stabbed in alley rear of 251 N. Western. Wouldn't talk.

Three rescued by firemen from flames in 3-story bldg., 3001-03 Van Buren. Started in rubbish heap.

Mrs. Augusta Reisberg, widow, 1338 S. Springfield av., sole support of nine children, found dead. Gas.

Max Nembo, 63, 425 N. Hamlin av., found dead. Gas.

Wm. Tannhauser, 2120 Bissell, waiter, dead. Gas. Despondent because he couldn't go back to Germany.

Wm. Malcolm, 36, 4644 St. Sacramento av., was crushed to death under the freight elevator in wholesale coffee plant of S. E. Marshall & Co., 44 E. Kinzie, today. Coroner is investigating.

Patrick Delaney, 225 N. Clark, bartender, arrested for striking W. J. Alberg, 228 N. Lockwood, over head with bottle.

Chris Frund, 4226 N. Ashland av., arrested after he and two friends ran up taxi bill and then failed to pay. Others escaped.

158 died of pneumonia last week.

Wade H. Powell, Blakely, Ga., guest at Hotel La Salle, sprung first straw hat on Chicago yesterday.
 
Body of John Smith, pal of late Police Inspector Shea, who has been missing from his home, 725 Independence blvd., since February, found in canal at Lemont.

John R. Thompson, speaking against kitchen extravagance, said there is enough food thrown away in U. S. to feed all Germany.



LOCAL WAR NOTES
 
Elks will aid recruiting.

Mechanics needed for navy. 

Emile Bastien suggests that grocers adopt non-delivery plan to cut prices.

Prof. Scott Nearing, speaking at Sunday Evening club, predicted hard times after the war.

Geo. Sobol, 1160 Erie, saved from violence by police after he is said to have stomped on American flag.

N. G. Eighth men were guests of Pres. Comiskey, White Sox ball team, yesterday.

All plans laid for Roosevelt speech in stockyards amphitheater Saturday. No tickets; first come first served. Doors open 7:30 p. m.

Capt. Wm. A. Moffett says that unless U. S. adopts universal service we will be put in position of "slacker hiding behind England's skirts."

Mark Potter, 5515 Woodlawn av.; Alfred Van Duyn, and Arne Mark, Kenilworth, who refused to stand in Orchestra hall during playing of "Star Spangled Banner," will be tried in S. Clark st court today.

New York. Rev. R. F. Berry, Presbyterian clergyman at Brownsville Manor, shot and killed his wife and mother-in-law, wounded his sister-in-law and killed self. Police says he had delusion that women were agents of Kaiser.



BASEBALL
 
  Fred Merkle is a cagey cuss. After signing his name to the hotel register in Cincinnati he wrote "Touring" in the space for place of residence. Fred is a fatalist and thinks he may do some more traveling before the end of the season. He opened his Cub career with a double and single.
  The coming of Merkle means that Dutch Ruether will do some more southpaw pitching. In his only trial against big leaguers the youngster showed good control and a variety of curves. Mitchell can use another good southpaw to take his regular turn in the box, as Gene Packard seems billed for rescue duty.


Fred Merkle.  By Unknown - NY Times, via Corbis, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8853061

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5146 on: April 23, 2017, 03:28:11 AM »
The Evening Star, April 23, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5147 on: April 23, 2017, 03:29:36 AM »
The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, April 23, 1917.


CANNOT FILL ORDERS FOR CANNED STAPLES - JOBBERS ADVISED THAT IT IS IMPOSSIBLS FOR DELIVERY OF MANY STAPLES

  The latest addition to the luxuries of everyday life is an advance in the cost of canned milk which circular advices state has been shoved up 55 cents a case, with instructions not to sell more than five cases to any customer. Hard wheat flour has advanced one dollar a barrel in the past week and sugar went up $1.65 in the course of 30 days. No attempt is made to fill orders for tomatoes, corn and other staple canned goods as the jobbers admit they have been cleaned out and see no way to replenish their stocks.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5148 on: April 23, 2017, 03:30:09 AM »
The Tacoma Times, April 23, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5149 on: April 23, 2017, 07:52:58 PM »
  The Red Baron got his 46th victory on April 22, 1917, a little after five o'clock in the afternoon.  Six allied planes (FE2s) from 11 Squadron had been up for an hour on a photo-op when Von Richthofen and his Staffel came upon them.

  All of the FE2s had observers posted at the front of the planes but their shooting must have been rather ineffective because only two of the machines made it back to base, each one with wounded observers.  Richthofen waited for his men to down three of the remaining planes and then he took care of the fourth one.  In his combat report, he wrote, "After 500 shots the plane plunged down and crashed to splinters on the ground.  The fight had begun above our side, but the prevailing east wind had drifted the planes to the west."  In other words, all of the downed FE2s were able to crash behind British lines.

  The FE2 that Von Richthofen shot down hit the ground hard and turned over three times.  The plane had literally turned to splinters as the Red Baron had noted.  If that weren't enough, the pilot, Lieutenant William Fred Fletcher had been shot in the head and an arm while his observer, Lieutenant Waldemar Franklin had been shot through the left leg. 

  Front line troops pulled the two airmen from their wreckage and got them to No.3 Casualty Clearing Station near the French town of Bapaume.  Not only did both men survive being shot down by Von Richthofen, but both survived the war. 

  Observer Franklin entered the oil business.  In their book, "Under The Guns of The Red Baron" authors Norman Franks, Hal Giblin and Nigel McCrery noted that Waldemar Franklin became a member of the Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.  (http://www.minersoc.org/)  He worked as a geologist for Anglo Iranian Oil, Shell Oil and Burma oil.  After his retirement, he and his wife lived out their lives at 4 Great Quarry, Guilford, Surrey.

  The authors also went on to point out that despite his severe wounds, the pilot, William Fletcher, was able to recover from them and resume being a teacher, something that had been interrupted at the outset of The Great War.  Mr. Fletcher would enjoy a long teaching career until his death at the age of sixty seven.

 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5150 on: April 24, 2017, 03:55:43 AM »
Everett True, April 24, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5151 on: April 24, 2017, 04:03:22 AM »
The Chicago Day Book, April 24, 1917.

NEWS OF THE DAY CONCERNING CHICAGO

Chief Schuettler plans to send hoboes to bone dry states.

Henry C. Lytton will auction off mementoes he collected for dead wife.

John F. McFadden, 5058 Sheridanrd., auditor for Montgomery Ward & Co., killed by street car.

Max Lurya, 2022 Erie, arrested as member of gang who have daubed several store windows with paint.

Jerome Katz, 16, 4223 Calumet av returned home after absence for several weeks. Wanted to make fortune, he said.

Wm. P. Whitaker, treas. Walker Vehicle Co., divorced by Hanna C Whitaker. Infidelity charged. Nettie Snell named.

Edw. Merriam, 22 E. 69th, suicide. Gas. Grieved because son had left to take out warrant charging him with disorderly conduct.

Sir Ernest H. Shackleton, (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_Shackleton) famous British explorer, lectured at Orchestra hall. Favors universal service.

Alfred Van Duyn, Arne Mark and Mark Porter, arrested in Orchestra hall for refusal to stand while national anthem was played, discharged with lecture on patriotism by Judge Mahoney.

Geo. Lapata, 1160 Erie, trampled on U. S. flag. $25 fine.
 
Michael Strym fined $1 and costs for telling laborers seeking work at Sherwin-Williams Paint Co. they would die of lead poisoning if they worked there.



WRESTLING

The winner of the John Olin "Strangler" Lewis wrestling match to be held at the Coliseum May 2 will have a chance at Earl Caddock and the championship. Caddock says he will be here with a check for $1,000 to bind a match for a date within two weeks of the Coliseum grapple. Joe Stecher will also be present to issue a challenge.


Lewis wrestles Ivan Linow in 1920. By Underwood & Underwood  Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=23334531



SEVERAL HELD IN DEATH OF PRIVATE DETECTIVE

  Several men were in custody today after the police made an investigation of the death of Richard Secord of 753 N. Long av., a private detective with the Thiel agency, when he ventured into the wilds back of the yards and stopped in the saloon of M. Sullivan at 47th and Princeton av. Railroad workers and gang ruffians mistook him for a spotter who has been reporting the men when they visit saloons in the neighborhood. They beat him to death.



LOCAL WAR NOTES

200 jackies left Great-Lakes station for east.

600 members First infantry were guests at Ringling circus.

Boys of 18 will now be accepted in national guard without consent of parents.

Enemy aliens barred as able seamen, steamboat inspectors announced. 

1,000 homes of aliens will be searched for weapons and explosives beginning today.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5152 on: April 24, 2017, 04:07:50 AM »
The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, April 24, 1917.

CARLOAD OF CHEVROLETS READY FOR DELIVERY

  A carload of Chevrolet cars was received by Stewart & Sellstrom today and they are ready to make instant deliveries. This is one of the most popular and complete cars on the market and those in Tonopah who have had experience with the Chevrolet say there is nothing like the speedy youngster with all the latest devices in the way of electric starter, electric lights, three speeds and a reverse, giving the owner all the advantages of a big car without the cost. The same firm is agent for the Super-Six Hudson, the prince of all cars that cannot be surpassed by any in the upper class of automobiles. If you are contemplating buying either kind of car call on J. Wesley Stewart or John Sellstrom. See them today.


1917 Hudson Phaeton.  By Adrian Pingstone - Taken by Adrian Pingstone in June 2003 and released to the public domain., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=565471

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5153 on: April 24, 2017, 04:08:34 AM »
The Tacoma Times, April 24, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5154 on: April 24, 2017, 09:22:08 PM »
Despite the war, fashion marches on.  Don't miss this advance showing at Eaton's!

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5155 on: April 25, 2017, 03:23:43 AM »
Everett True, April 25, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5156 on: April 25, 2017, 03:33:51 AM »
The Chicago Day Book, April 25, 1917.

NEWS OF THE DAY CONCERNING CHICAGO

Richard East, Evanston chauffeur, fell from second-story window. Landed on head. Never hurt him.

Con men got $814, his life's savings, from Mohammed Abed, Persian peddler, 24 E. 18th. Switching pocketbook game.

John Kulczyk, 847 N. Carpenter, who weighed 560 pounds, and Jos. Roulla, 6517 S. Halsted, who weighed 400, two of Chicago's "biggest men," died yesterday,

Paul J. Kaehler, Evanston, fined $40 and costs for shooting song birds in Turner's woods.

Bronze statue, "Butensky's Exile," valued at $800, stolen from Hebrew Institute, 1258 Taylor.
(http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/ecatalogue/lot.152.html/2006/19th-20th-century-european-sculpture-l06232)

Two men held up 12th st. car at S. Hamilton av. Robbed conductor of $7. Police came. After running battle, Wm. Cosgrove, 2212 W. 13th, was arrested.

Late Fritz von Frantzius' photos of former wife, Sarahet, the dancer, to be auctioned off today.


Australian dancer Saharet.  By Bain News Service. Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7107294



BASEBALL - RISBERG HAS NERVE -  DOESN'T FALTER IN PINCH
By Mark Shields

  During yesterday's game with Cleveland, during which the White Sox fielding was porous on numerous occasions, there were some cries from the stand for Zeb Terry when Swede Risberg, the new shortstop, was in difficulty.
  These, of course, were changed to yelps of adulation for the new short fielder when he opened the ninth inning with a screaming triple and scored the only run of the game on Eddie Collins' sacrifice fly. The hit made Swede a hero and his fielding mistakes were forgotten. Such is the humor of a baseball crowd.



BOXING

  Johnny Harvey knocked out Joe Rivers in the seventh round at New York. Until the final blow, the fight had been an even affair, with Rivers giving as good as he took.

  Knockout Brown is training diligently for his bout in Gary Friday night with Joe Herrick. The Greek says he will be an easy winner.
 
 


 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5157 on: April 25, 2017, 03:34:54 AM »
The Tacoma Times, April 25, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5158 on: April 25, 2017, 01:49:58 PM »
The Chicago Day Book, April 25, 1917.

NEWS OF THE DAY CONCERNING CHICAGO



Paul J. Kaehler, Evanston, fined $40 and costs for shooting song birds in Turner's woods.
Google is lacking. Some references in musings and book but I can't identify where "Turner's Woods" was or if it still exists. But at one point it did, and despite Mr. Kaehler's best efforts the birds were still around:
http://collections-zoology.fieldmuseum.org/catalogue/1764449

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #5159 on: April 25, 2017, 04:23:42 PM »
Google is lacking. Some references in musings and book but I can't identify where "Turner's Woods" was or if it still exists. But at one point it did, and despite Mr. Kaehler's best efforts the birds were still around:
http://collections-zoology.fieldmuseum.org/catalogue/1764449

I wanted to learn if Paul Kaehler found bigger game in hunting the Bosch.  I did locate a Paul J. Kaehler grave in nearby Wisconsin, dated from 1887 to 1969.  He would have been 29/30 years old during America's involvement in WWI.  He and his wife Laura didn't have Paul Jr. until 1928 when Paul Sr. would have been 41.  No other info and no obit.  (Kind of on the old side for having a first kid.)