Author One Hundred Years Ago  (Read 244431 times)

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Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4920 on: March 16, 2017, 04:27:48 AM »
The Tacoma Times, March 16, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4921 on: March 16, 2017, 03:06:35 PM »
Here is a video about a man who was born on this day, one hundred years ago.  At first I thought he had made it to 100 but he died back in 1990.  Still, an interesting look at a fellow who wasn't a star, or a well known personality.  Just a regular dude going about his life, in his allotted time.

 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4922 on: March 16, 2017, 03:56:13 PM »
The Chicago Day Book, March 16, 1917.

NEWS OF THE DAY CONCERNING CHICAGO

City employees of Irish extraction, except in police or fire dep't, holiday tomorrow.

Ha, we all know from old movies, books, and tv shows that all of Irish extraction back in those times held jobs in the Fire Dept or Police.

 

BA GOSH! YOU NEVER CAN TELL WHAT YOU ARE GETTING 

  Judge Landis sort of butted in on the question of butter or butterine, as served to patrons of Chicago's eat places yesterday, and in so doing signified much surprise that some of the bills against H. H. Kohlsaat & Co. were for butterine.
  "What?" snapped Landis. "Do you mean to say that this company served butterine to its customers? Did they buy it white and color it themselves? Did the customers know what they were getting or did they think they were getting country butter?"
  This all happened when a creditors' committee asked permission to take over the Kohlsaat business. This body said they could get $25,000 for the seven Kohlsaat restaurants. Landis said he could get more and ordered the places sold at auction in his court next Monday morning.

The Butter/Oleo wars and controversies continue!





Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4923 on: March 16, 2017, 04:50:17 PM »
Quote
The Butter/Oleo wars and controversies continue!

That judge seemed a bit overly sensitive on the subject.  Was he utilizing a little subterfuge to get the auctions to be held in his courtroom?  If so, I wonder if he benefited from the proceedings.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4924 on: March 16, 2017, 09:30:36 PM »
That judge seemed a bit overly sensitive on the subject.  Was he utilizing a little subterfuge to get the auctions to be held in his courtroom?  If so, I wonder if he benefited from the proceedings.
Yes, it seemed an odd out-burst which, from what I can tell, would usually be a rather bland hearing about a bankruptcy proceeding or some such. I wonder if maybe the Judge frequently ate at the H. H. Kohlsaat & Co.'s restaurants and had strong personal opinions on the butter/oleo feud or felt personally cheated by not getting real butter at some point eating there?

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4925 on: March 16, 2017, 10:26:58 PM »
Yes, it seemed an odd out-burst which, from what I can tell, would usually be a rather bland hearing about a bankruptcy proceeding or some such. I wonder if maybe the Judge frequently ate at the H. H. Kohlsaat & Co.'s restaurants and had strong personal opinions on the butter/oleo feud or felt personally cheated by not getting real butter at some point eating there?

What a great point.  Now I can picture the Judge (and Mrs. Judge) dinning away, thinking they were getting real butter while the poor, working class peons had to go elsewhere and be served oleo.  Haha, good one, albrecht!

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4926 on: March 16, 2017, 10:42:18 PM »
What a great point.  Now I can picture the Judge (and Mrs. Judge) dinning away, thinking they were getting real butter while the poor, working class peons had to go elsewhere and be served oleo.  Haha, good one, albrecht!
I mean it could be he was trying to discover a subplot in the hearing (like a racket selling butterine (oleo) as real butter, thus breaking the law, cheating customers/businesses, avoiding taxes, etc,) like a Black Hand operation, but his personal sensitivities and outburst  make it seem like our scenario, with Mrs. Judge, being over-charged and getting an inferior product outraged him and he might be getting some blow-back at home from Mrs. Judge when he goes back home.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4927 on: March 17, 2017, 04:05:56 AM »
The Chicago Day Book, March 17, 1917.

NEWS OF THE DAY CONCERNING CHICAGO

May King, 3142 S. Park av., had Louis Clark, 1420 Warren av., arrested in loop movie. Said he annoyed her.

100 lbs. of dynamite stolen from E. L Du Pont de Nemours & Co., Lambert. Ill.

Loop office bldg. owners taking out "bomb" policies.

Coroner's jury freed Thos. Watson, slayer of Nick Delaney, sleuth.

Julia Murphy, accused of embezzling $18,000 from J. Russell Price, wants $50,000 damages from Dr. C. E. Cessna, head of firm. Says he attacked her.

100 freight cars burned in mysterious fire at Kensington yards, Michigan Central.

Two men got Urban Johnson to drive them to 42d and Western. Robbed him of $35, carried him under gunpoint to 31st, then kicked him out and ran away with his car.

Furman D. Updike, whose sons were accused of plotting his death, died.

Eugene Rose, 832 Taylor, arrested as thief suspect. 700 raincoats found.


HERE'S HOW THEY DO IT!

  Today is the day flower shops sell you green carnations, roses, lillies of the valley, etc. Do you know how  they make 'em green? Just put ordinary white flowers in a vase of green ink the same way you would in a vase of water. The flower drinks up the green fluid as it drinks water. Then go ahead and celebrate St Patrick's day by Wearing o' the Green.


ANECDOTES OF PRIZE RING HEROES BY NOTED REFEREE
By Eddie Graney

  Tom Sharkey decided on a turkey one day and figured he'd attend to the purchase himself.
  "What's that big bi-rr-rud worth up there?" said Tom, pointing to a fine, large turkey.
  The deal ended with Tom ordering the bird sent to his place. He had seen it weighed at 18 pounds and got a price of 30 cents a pound. Tom received the turkey and a bill for $5.40.
  To be sure his turk weighed the full 18 pounds, Tom took it out and found a pair of scales. It only weighed 16 pounds.
  "At 30 cents the pound I'll never pay $5.40 for that turkey," said Tom. "Sure and this is thirty-three and a third percent worse than the James boys."
  He rang up O'Brien who owned the market where he had purchased the bird. O'Brien explained that cleaning the turkey and so on had caused the two pounds to disappear.
  "Uh-huh! Uh-huh! I get ye," Tom yelled at him. "But let me tell ye this, Mr. O'Brien. Ye can't slip any 3 o'clock in the afternoon stuff over on me. Nothin' but ringside weight goes for Tom Sharkey."  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Sharkey
 

RICE SNOWBALLS

  To six ounces of rice use 1 quart of milk, flavoring of essence of almonds, lemon peel or vanilla, sugar to taste and 1 pint of custard. Boil the rice in the milk, with sugar and flavoring, until the rice is tender, adding if necessary a little more milk should it dry away too much. When the rice is quite soft, put it into tea cups or small round jars, and let stand until cold; then turn out the rice on a deep glass dish, pour over a custard and on top of each ball, place a small piece of bright colored preserve or jelly.


FRENCH GUNNERS BRING DOWN ZEPPELIN IN PARIS STREETS - ALL OF CREW KILLED.

  Paris, March 17. From 11,000 feet in the sky, French expert anti aircraft gunners today at Compiegne brougnt down in blazing ruins a giant German Zeppelin, one of a number apparently returning from a raid on England.
  It fell in one of the main streets of the city a charred mass, those of its crew who remained aboard being burned into unrecognizable masses. Two or three of the crew, mad with pain of the flames and certain of death, preferred to meet it otherwise than in a mass of fire and jumped thousands of feet to the earth.
  Thousands gathered in the streets to listen to the rattle of the anti-aircraft guns and to cheer the marksmen. When one monster of the sky was hit there was a tremendous outburst of cheering.
  Meanwhile the Zeppelins from their vast height aloft had launched several bombs at the town. No one was hurt by them and the damage was insignificant. The greater peril came when the blazing mass of the stricken Zeppelin shot down from aloft, gathering momentum as it fell nearly two miles from the sky, but no one was injured.
  A cable from London late last night announced that an air raid was in progress on "southeastern counties of England." Presumably the Zeppelin reported destroyed as above was a participator in this raid.
  This is the first raid on which Zeppelins have participated since the death of their inventor.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4928 on: March 17, 2017, 04:10:15 AM »
The Evening Star, March 17, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4929 on: March 17, 2017, 04:16:12 AM »
The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, March 17, 1917.

AIRDOME TONIGHT


  A grim situation that will grip you with the most intense emotion, as the question is flung at his childless wife by the child-loving district attorney, as portrayed by that master player Tyrone Power, in "Where Are My Children?" The marvelous photoplay "Where Are My Children?" created a sensation on Broadway. It compelled the admiration of press, public and clergy. physicians and educators gave it their unqualified endorsement. It is a dignified presentment of the subject of birth control, produced by a reverent and master hand. Scenario and story by Lois Weber. Admitted the most brilliant mind in moving pictures today. Every youth and maiden; every man and woman, married or single, should see this great picture.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Where_Are_My_Children%3F


Advertisement in The Moving Picture World for the American film Where Are My Children? (1916).  By Unknown - Internet Archive, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=29373966



Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4930 on: March 17, 2017, 04:17:11 AM »
The Tacoma Times, March 17, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4931 on: March 17, 2017, 07:49:59 PM »
Baron Manfred Von Richthofen scored his 27th and 28th victories on March 17, 1917.  In the first encounter, Richthofen and nine other fellow pilots came across fifteen enemy planes.  A dogfight ensued and Richthofen was able to force a Vickers two-seater aside and he poured 800 shots into it.  The two British airmen, pilot Arthur Elsdale Boultbee and observer Frederick King didn't have a chance for survival as their craft was literally shot to pieces as it fell to Earth. 

Photo of  Arthur Boultbee: http://www.gibbs.fastfreenet.com/WebPages/WebPhotos/Individuals/ArthurElsdaleBoultbee.htm

Later in the day Richthofen was flying over No Man's Land when he spotted an enemy aircraft flying far beneath him.  The Baron shot some bursts of machine gun fire down at the plane (a BE2G) in hopes of getting it to fly up towards him but the machine didn't accept his offer to fight and continued on its way.  Richthofen then flew down beneath his opponent and was able to fire on it from below.  The two English airmen, pilot George Macdonald Watt and his observer Ernest Adam Howlett had even less of a chance for survival then the two earlier victims.  Richthofen shot both wings off their plane causing it to plummet down into No Man's Land and he noticed that German troops fired on what was left of the BE2G.  Both men were later buried in the same cemetery; Bruay Communal Cemetery in France.  http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/56200/BRUAY%20COMMUNAL%20CEMETERY%20EXTENSION

Richthofen was flying a red Halberstad DII at this time.


Halberstadt D.II  Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9731154

In their book, Under The Guns of The Red Baron, authors Norman Franks, Hal Giblin and Nigel McCrery point out that Richthofen and his red colored plane were now a familiar sight to all of his opponents.  As a result, The Red Baron was spotted  all over the place, in fact, way too many places for him to possibly be.  This was because a number of other German pilots had also painted their machines red.




Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4932 on: March 18, 2017, 05:11:25 PM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4933 on: March 19, 2017, 04:07:40 AM »
Everett True, March 19, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4934 on: March 19, 2017, 04:10:20 AM »
The Chicago Day Book, March 19, 1917.

NEWS OF THE DAY CONCERNING CHICAGO
 
Charles Arigo, 441 Townsend, arrested when he sold $50 worth of iron to Mose Gerber, 809 Milton av. for 13 cents. Stolen?

Tommy McCalla, 1416 E. 69th st. found the "first robin of spring" yesterday.

Mrs. Mary Cox, 54, 939 Concord pl., dead in mystery. Police found wounds on head. Investigating.

Mrs. John O'Leary took son from St. Michael's academy, Plymouth, Ind., after she says husband kidnapped and took him there.

John Sherlock, saloonkeeper, 1012, lost cash register and $50 when he left bar for back room.

 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4935 on: March 19, 2017, 04:14:26 AM »
The Evening Star, March 19, 1917.  (Ed: There was a big time threat for a strike by railroad workers that would have crippled the economy, but both sides came to an agreement.  An eight hour work day was agreed to by big business.) 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4936 on: March 19, 2017, 04:16:24 AM »
The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, March 19, 1917.

ST. PATRICK'S DANCE WAS A GREAT SUCCESS

  The dance given at the Airdome in celebration of St. Patrick's day was a success of the first order. The floor was crowded until midnight and the music rendered by Young's orchestra was in harmony with the anniversary. The hall was decorated with the national and Irish colors and the dancers enjoyed themselves to the utmost. Father Diss was present in the early part of the evening and expressed him self highly pleased.
  The moving pictures given in advance of the dance were pronounced very edifying and instructive and it was regretted that the attendance at this part of the program was not what it should have been.


FALLON MAN GORED BY A BULL IN A CORRAL


  Bert Grlnnel, son of A. E. Grinnell of Fallon, was gored by a savage bull, and suffered the fracture of two ribs and the right elbow on Wednesday. The animal had hitherto showed no signs of ill temper, but when young Grinnell entered the corral the bull suddenly attacked him. Grinnell drove him off by kicking him on the nose, but the bull returned to the charge, and Grinnell fled, running backward and kicking the bull. Not looking where he was going he backed into a cottonwood tree and the bull crushed him against the trunk.


INDIAN BUMPS OFF

  Dave, the Hot Creek Indian, who tried to commit suicide ten days ago by shooting his head off, died last evening. Dave while despondent, put a gun under his chin and pulled the trigger, resulting in a wound that damaged the jaw and supposed to be in a fair way of recovery. The body may be taken out to his old home.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4937 on: March 19, 2017, 04:17:03 AM »
The Tacoma Times, March 19, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4938 on: March 19, 2017, 04:03:56 PM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4939 on: March 20, 2017, 03:41:31 AM »
The Chicago Day Book, March 20, 1917.

NEWS OF THE DAY CONCERNING CHICAGO 
 
James Ryan, 3950 W. 12th. freed of gambling charge when he told the judge that Policeman Arthur Horr, who arrested him, lost 80 cents in the game.

Paul Bernfoot, 1114 W. Chicago av., fined $50 for trying to evade jury service.

Cruelty, desertion and drunkenness charged by Mrs. Betty Kraft in suit for divorce from Ben Kraft.

Jas. Liapos, bootblack, 647 S. Dearborn, lost $300 to two men by use of handkerchief game.

John Dingier, saloonkeeper, Hammond, threw out patron last night. Then died behind bar. Heart disease.

Albert Budasek, 1802 S. Throop, hit John Hrack, 829 N. Kostner av., over the head as he was stabbed in fight. Both may die.


BOXING NEWS

Kid Lewis knocked Willie Moore cold in the first round, at New York. Moore had to be carried from the ring.


Boxer Ted "Kid" Lewis in fighting pose. By Unknown - Corbis Images Image #42-17652740, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=32800458

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4940 on: March 20, 2017, 03:43:00 AM »
The Tacoma Times, March 20, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4941 on: March 20, 2017, 06:56:38 PM »
Vera Lynn, born on March 20, 1917 and still with us, though she retired from singing back in 1984.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vera_Lynn


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4942 on: March 21, 2017, 05:36:19 AM »
The Chicago Day Book, March 21, 1917.

NEWS OF THE DAY CONCERNING CHICAGO
 
Frank Ondrowicz, Leo Zevnik and Jos. Jurkas, La Salle, DL, fined $50 and given day in jail for fraud in getting citizenship papers.

Albert Brasius and John McGowan arrested in loop as short change experts.

Mrs. Bertha Schon, 1452 E. 63d, fined $25 and costs for selling liquor in candy store.

Henry Landwirth, 1046 N. California av., in morals court because of his ideas on love and marriage. Hearing set for March 27.

Mrs. Ethel Erickson, 641 Dale av., asked that wedding to Kenneth be annulled. She was 14 when they were married.

Judge Landis may run Kohlsaat restaurants unless he gets a better bid than $25,000 for them. 

Ira Doolittle, Libertyville, tried to die by gas. Then shot himself.

Stink bomb thrown into Oak Park Y. M. C. A. by ousted former member.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4943 on: March 21, 2017, 05:37:07 AM »
The Tacoma Times, March 21, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4944 on: March 21, 2017, 03:52:43 PM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4945 on: March 21, 2017, 04:13:04 PM »
The Chicago Day Book, March 21, 1917.

NEWS OF THE DAY CONCERNING CHICAGO
 
Frank Ondrowicz, Leo Zevnik and Jos. Jurkas, La Salle, DL, fined $50 and given day in jail for fraud in getting citizenship papers.

Henry Landwirth, 1046 N. California av., in morals court because of his ideas on love and marriage. Hearing set for March 27.

Judge Landis may run Kohlsaat restaurants unless he gets a better bid than $25,000 for them. 


Funny how citizenship, immigration, and other issues are still being fought about today.

The involvement and statements of Judge Landis in the Kohlstaat restuarants case is very suspicious. Very odd.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4946 on: March 21, 2017, 05:31:47 PM »
Funny how citizenship, immigration, and other issues are still being fought about today.

The involvement and statements of Judge Landis in the Kohlstaat restuarants case is very suspicious. Very odd.

Yes, we did have our suspicions about the judge, now didn't we? 

My enquiring (dirty) mind wants to know what exactly Mr. Landwirth's ideas were on love and marriage.

I used to think that 100 years was a long time ago but really, not so much when you think that there are people still alive today from that time.  Plus, there are lots of people who's grandparents were alive back then.  I often wonder if any sharp eyed person from Chicago has seen a grandparent, great aunt or great uncle, named in this thread.
 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4947 on: March 22, 2017, 04:30:13 AM »
Everett True, March 22, 1917.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4948 on: March 22, 2017, 04:39:40 AM »
The Chicago Day Book, March 22, 1917.

CHICAGO BRIEFS

Willard Hamilton from Floyd county, Kentucky, lost $140 to city slickers.

Michael Hogan and John Murphy sent to Bridewell for 60 days. Stole tub of butter.
 
Federal Judge Landls again refused to appoint receiver for the Kohlsaat restaurants.

Mrs. Louise Keats, 709 Montrose Blvd., got divorce on plea that hubby was drunk eight times a month.

Guy Lee, newspaper man, 526 Dlversey pky., arrested for driving auto while drunk. Ran down two; one may die.

New rule at Northwestern Univ. requires lights out at 10:30 in girls' dorm.

Jacob Sonnenschein, 1545 Elburn av., Socialist candidate in 10th ward, shot on way home from meeting. Will live.

Julius Baroske, 6147 Ellis av., escaped from Dunning and visited his wife, who promptly had him arrested and sent back.


ANECDOTES OF PRIZE RING HEROES BY NOTED REFEREE
By Eddie Graney (Great Among Great Referees)

Everybody knows that "Spider" Kelly has a sharp tongue and ready wit.
The "Spider" proved this many a time during his career in the ring and when behind fighters.
One could never tell what the "Spider" was going to spring next. He had a different come-back every time.
One night I refereed a go between Jack Johnson and Sam McVey. Kelly was seconding McVey and trying to make the best of a bad mess.
After a while McVey goes down and out. We're all standing over him and wondering whether Johnson had killed him or not in the midst of the worry and after he'd been counted out five minutes, Sam begins to open his eyes.
Lots of first aid work brought him up in a dazed condition and he says to Kelly: "What was it, a draw?"
Kelly gave him one of those "you poor boob" looks of his and said:
"Say, you, didn't get no draw! That big stiff of a referee, Graney, gave it to Johnson. Whadda yu' think about that?"


Tommy "Spider" Kelly around the period he was world bantamweight champion.  By Tommy Kelly - http://boxrec.com/media/index.php/Tommy_Spider_Kelly, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=44632950


Sam McVey passport photo.  By Unknown - https://www.flickr.com/photos/puzzlemaster/15067787088/in/set-72157604561572797, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=36487378 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #4949 on: March 22, 2017, 04:40:26 AM »
The Evening Star, March 22, 1917.