Author One Hundred Years Ago  (Read 222657 times)

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Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #30 on: January 03, 2016, 05:09:06 PM »
Hey Rix you got an endorsement from coaster!  I'd fall off my chair but for all the pillows.

Ha Ha. Yeah, coaster's an alright dude.  He gave me a thumbs up remark on a movie review that I made awhile back.  lol

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #31 on: January 03, 2016, 05:43:08 PM »
As the visual aid clearly indicates, we know "Surprisingly little" about the sinking of the Titanic, and "Almost everything else is conjecture," so here are a couple of sources to check out for the alleged Jack Johnson connection.  While similar, they disagree on some key details, but according to the conditions stipulated by Mr. Hamer, their version of events cannot be lightly dismissed.



 

Lol  Typical Lead Belly.  I can comprehend everything that he sings in this song except for the "meat and potato's" lyrics at the very end. 

"When he huddled by that muddy shop,
might have seen a man on The Eagle Rock." ?

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #32 on: January 03, 2016, 06:05:02 PM »
Lol  Typical Lead Belly.  I can comprehend everything that he sings in this song except for the "meat and potato's" lyrics at the very end. 

"When he huddled by that muddy shop,
might have seen a man on The Eagle Rock." ?

The line probably is, "a man doin' The Eagle Rock," which was a popular dance in the early twentieth century.  Jamie Brockett's version (loosely based on Leadbelly's) asserts that when Jack Johnson learned of the sinking, he did indeed do the Eagle Rock all up and down the pier.

I've also read that Johnson supposedly predicted the Titanic would go down after he was refused passage, but then I've also read that he was actually in the U.S. at the time and never had anything to do with the ship.  I guess we really do know "surprisingly little" about it!  :D 


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #33 on: January 03, 2016, 08:12:13 PM »
The line probably is, "a man doin' The Eagle Rock," which was a popular dance in the early twentieth century.  Jamie Brockett's version (loosely based on Leadbelly's) asserts that when Jack Johnson learned of the sinking, he did indeed do the Eagle Rock all up and down the pier.

I've also read that Johnson supposedly predicted the Titanic would go down after he was refused passage, but then I've also read that he was actually in the U.S. at the time and never had anything to do with the ship.  I guess we really do know "surprisingly little" about it!  :D

Well thankee there, Robert.  You gave my a real "well I learned something new today" moment.  You are right, The Eagle Rock was indeed a dance that was popular way back when.  It used to have a hop to it but over time it was replaced with a shuffle.   :D

http://streetswing.com/histmain/z3eaglerock1.htm

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #34 on: January 03, 2016, 08:26:48 PM »
Here's a fellow that passed away exactly one hundred years ago, today.

   Black, William Perkins (1842-1916) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Woodford County, Ky., November 11, 1842. Democrat. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; received the Medal of Honor for action at Pea Ridge, Ark., March 7, 1862; lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1886. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Died January 3, 1916 (age 73 years, 53 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.



http://www.chicagohs.org/hadc/visuals/30V0610.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_P._Black
http://politicalgraveyard.com/bio/black.html#417.17.37

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #35 on: January 03, 2016, 08:35:06 PM »
Well thankee there, Robert.  You gave my a real "well I learned something new today" moment.  You are right, The Eagle Rock was indeed a dance that was popular way back when.  It used to have a hop to it but over time it was replaced with a shuffle.   :D

http://streetswing.com/histmain/z3eaglerock1.htm
There was a ridiculous, but hilarious, sequence in the movie "Haunted Honeymoon" with Dom DeLuise, dressed in drag, "ballin' the jack" with Gilda Radner (RIP both.)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #36 on: January 03, 2016, 08:36:40 PM »
births on this day

January 3
Maxene Andrews, American singer (The Andrews Sisters) (d. 1995)
Betty Furness, American actress and consumer activist (d. 1994)
Bernard Greenhouse, American cellist (d. 2011)
Warren King, American cartoonist (d. 1978)


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #37 on: January 03, 2016, 08:49:43 PM »
Another advert.  Guess it only got 12 to 14 mpg.  Not too good.  lol



http://oldautonews.com/the-marmon-34-automobile/

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #38 on: January 03, 2016, 09:17:42 PM »
Another advert.  Guess it only got 11 to 12 mpg.  Not too good.  lol


Especially since gas stations were probably few and far between outside the big cities.

They certainly had an unconventional marketing campaign!  ;D  "We had to raise the price, but we're confident you won't mind paying more for the quality we offer."  For $2950, that better have been one "remarkable motor car," because that was probably higher than a lot of people's annual income in 1916. 

Now I'm curious about what different occupations paid back then and might have to look into that.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #39 on: January 03, 2016, 09:39:48 PM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #40 on: January 03, 2016, 09:45:18 PM »
Especially since gas stations were probably few and far between outside the big cities.

They certainly had an unconventional marketing campaign!  ;D  "We had to raise the price, but we're confident you won't mind paying more for the quality we offer."  For $2950, that better have been one "remarkable motor car," because that was probably higher than a lot of people's annual income in 1916. 

Now I'm curious about what different occupations paid back then and might have to look into that.

Yeah I laughed at that, too.  I like to think this is pre-ad-agency writing by the good, honest folks who actually made the thing.  More likely it's an early effort at prestige marketing, though.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #41 on: January 03, 2016, 10:03:05 PM »
Yeah I laughed at that, too.  I like to think this is pre-ad-agency writing by the good, honest folks who actually made the thing.  More likely it's an early effort at prestige marketing, though.

This from the above link when the car was released onto the streets of El Paso:  Trost and his assistants have had little rest during the past five days. There are so many new features on the new Marmon that It takes some time to show the visitors Its many advantages and Mr. Trost stated Friday night that he was about “all in.”  In the right hands, this could make a good contemporary take on a new car advertisement.  Anybody on Madison Avenue listening in?

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #42 on: January 04, 2016, 12:31:22 AM »
Yeah I laughed at that, too.  I like to think this is pre-ad-agency writing by the good, honest folks who actually made the thing.  More likely it's an early effort at prestige marketing, though.

Maybe it's a little of both.  The ad copy does sound like the company is committed to providing a quality product and sincerely regrets having to raise prices to maintain its high standards, while also strongly implying that a discerning clientele such as theirs will just accept it in stride even if they might bitch a little about it.  ;D

I didn't have much luck finding information about average individual annual incomes in 1916, but Babe Ruth made $3500 in his second full year in the major leagues (as a pitcher who won 18 games, led the AL in ERA, starts, and shutouts, and hit four home runs).  At the top end of the MLB pay scale, veteran superstar Ty Cobb's salary was $20,000.  That means it's a good bet that your typical ribbon clerks, icemen, elevator operators, and hotel house dicks didn't make anywhere close to that, so they could probably manage a decent, if drab, lower-middle class lifestyle but could only dream of owning a Marmon 34. 



Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #43 on: January 04, 2016, 12:43:44 AM »
Maybe it's a little of both.  The ad copy does sound like the company is committed to providing a quality product and sincerely regrets having to raise prices to maintain its high standards, while also strongly implying that a discerning clientele such as theirs will just accept it in stride even if they might bitch a little about it.  ;D

I didn't have much luck finding information about average individual annual incomes in 1916, but Babe Ruth made $3500 in his second full year in the major leagues (as a pitcher who won 18 games, led the AL in ERA, starts, and shutouts, and hit four home runs).  At the top end of the MLB pay scale, veteran superstar Ty Cobb's salary was $20,000.  That means it's a good bet that your typical ribbon clerks, icemen, elevator operators, and hotel house dicks didn't make anywhere close to that, so they could probably manage a decent, if drab, lower-middle class lifestyle but could only dream of owning a Marmon 34.

Thanks, that's good info!  With the Model T going for under $500 I was sure it was a fancy car.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #44 on: January 04, 2016, 12:54:48 AM »
Thanks, that's good info!  With the Model T going for under $500 I was sure it was a fancy car.

If you want to see some amazing fancy imaginary cars, check out the work of Bruce McCall, particularly his Bulgemobiles, if you haven't already.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #45 on: January 04, 2016, 02:05:33 AM »
Believe it or not, there's a Marmon company still in existence...  And, yes, they probably earned that hefty price tag  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marmon_Motor_Car_Company

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #46 on: January 04, 2016, 02:09:34 AM »
Believe it or not, there's a Marmon still in existence...  And, yes, they probably earned that hefty price tag  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marmon_Motor_Car_Company

Ooh cool that explains the ad.  From Wikipedia:

Quote
The 1916 Model 34 used an aluminum straight-6, and used aluminum in the body and chassis to reduce overall weight to just 3295 lb (1495 kg).

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #47 on: January 04, 2016, 04:34:59 AM »
As the visual aid clearly indicates, we know "Surprisingly little" about the sinking of the Titanic, and "Almost everything else is conjecture,"

Here's a few facts that we know for sure: Someone gave James Cameron over a billion fucking dollars to make that stupid fucking movie, which was an inexplicable hit... largely due to overseas "box office receipts."

I don't know how many dots I have to connect for you before it becomes a line that leads to your heart, but I'm not really aiming for that here.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #48 on: January 04, 2016, 12:15:59 PM »
Here's a few facts that we know for sure: Someone gave James Cameron over a billion fucking dollars to make that stupid fucking movie

I vowed on William McMaster Murdoch's grave to hunt down the person(s) responsible for that and make them suffer if it's the last thing I do. 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #49 on: January 04, 2016, 02:59:50 PM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #50 on: January 04, 2016, 03:37:26 PM »


An important, three day meeting was being held by the Coca Cola Company one hundred years ago.  It appears that the convention was being held for the purpose of selecting a glass maker's design for a more familiar type of bottle.  Earlier Coke bottles were smooth sided. 



The convention was held at the Hotel Ansley in Atlanta, Georgia.



Here's the whole story.  Oh, and one of two bottles of the early design was sold at auction for $248,000.00 back in 2011.

http://www.antique-bottles.net/showthread.php?608448-1916-COCA-COLA-PROTOTYPE-BOTTLE%28S%29-PICTURE-GALLERY

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #51 on: January 04, 2016, 03:50:12 PM »
An important, three day meeting was being held by the Coca Cola Company one hundred years ago.  It appears that the convention was being held for the purpose of selecting a glass maker's design for a more familiar type of bottle.  Earlier Coke bottles were smooth sided. 

Nice little vignette!  They had a barbecue and were addressed by a judge, who I imagine as Foghorn Leghorn.  Did not suspect that corporate boondoggles have such a long history.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #52 on: January 04, 2016, 03:58:56 PM »
Nice little vignette!  They had a barbecue and were addressed by a judge, who I imagine as Foghorn Leghorn.  Did not suspect that corporate boondoggles have such a long history.

Haha  No doubt in my mind that the judge got up and said "Yes sah...That was a good,.. I say that was a mighty good barbecue...yes sah." 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #53 on: January 04, 2016, 04:04:41 PM »
Especially since gas stations were probably few and far between outside the big cities.

They certainly had an unconventional marketing campaign!  ;D  "We had to raise the price, but we're confident you won't mind paying more for the quality we offer."  For $2950, that better have been one "remarkable motor car," because that was probably higher than a lot of people's annual income in 1916. 

Now I'm curious about what different occupations paid back then and might have to look into that.
I was googling for that last night and couldn't find much. However I did find some info from a Missouri handbook that priced and compared various foods and supplies from Missouri in 1916. Thought that was vaguely interesting.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #54 on: January 04, 2016, 04:09:57 PM »
Slim Gaillard  was born on this day in 1916.






Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #55 on: January 04, 2016, 04:18:48 PM »
I was googling for that last night and couldn't find much. However I did find some info from a Missouri handbook that priced and compared various foods and supplies from Missouri in 1916. Thought that was vaguely interesting.

I was surprised the individual wage and income info isn't readily available. Do you have a link to that Missouri handbook?  Thanks!

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #56 on: January 04, 2016, 06:41:33 PM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #57 on: January 04, 2016, 06:52:53 PM »
I was surprised the individual wage and income info isn't readily available. Do you have a link to that Missouri handbook?  Thanks!
I was surprised how easy it was to find information but how complicated it starts to get because there are so many factors- besides the obvious stuff like mean or median or net or gross but then you have in 'real money' comparison, inflation, the taxation and withholding differences, who actually had to file (most didn't need to do so for quite some time,) and also- over time- what bucket of stuff went into 'wage and income.' Single/versus household (now many women work, for example.) And/or downloading large pdfs (or worse Google scanned books and wading through the stuff.) I'm convinced there is a reason why economists and government agencies made so many "adjustments" on terms, rates, and policy....even between departments and keep so much data- makes it harder to compare what the heck is really going on (and keeps some economic professors, pundits, politicians, civil servants, and economists employed!)
for 1920:
https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-soi/20soirepar.pdf

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #58 on: January 04, 2016, 10:42:43 PM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #59 on: January 04, 2016, 11:00:31 PM »