Author One Hundred Years Ago  (Read 222549 times)

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Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #210 on: January 09, 2016, 01:40:33 PM »
And Maxine Andrews was born January 3, 1916!

Damn - how did the thread miss that?

For Maxine, Patty and LaVerne


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #211 on: January 09, 2016, 01:46:29 PM »
Damn - how did the thread miss that?

For Maxine, Patty and LaVerne


I actually saw it on the 3rd and then got distracted and forgot to post it. My bad.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #212 on: January 09, 2016, 02:07:51 PM »
Submitted on May 5, 1916.  Look at the date that it was accepted.  "Further objects of my invention will appear from a consideration of the same appearing hereinafter."  I bet Mr Jone's lawyer put that in there.


That was probably for the copy they had to file with the Department of Redundancy Department.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #213 on: January 09, 2016, 02:09:27 PM »
'tis ok.  My daughter and I play a silly game where we take turns playing youtube's of different songs to each other.   The first one to hit pause on a tune is the loser.   I almost always win because I know who the Captain and Tennille are (along with other 70's songs|artists).     It is getting harder - the last time we played I had to drop back to the '60's for the kill shot with the Singing Nun   

I admire the way you play dirty, sir!  It sounds pretty harsh, though, so don't let the DHS get wind of it!

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #214 on: January 09, 2016, 02:11:22 PM »
'tis ok.  My daughter and I play a silly game where we take turns playing youtube's of different songs to each other.   The first one to hit pause on a tune is the loser.   I almost always win because I know who the Captain and Tennille are (along with other 70's songs|artists).     It is getting harder - the last time we played I had to drop back to the '60's for the kill shot with the Singing Nun   

Have you whipped out "Dead skunk in the middle of the road" yet?

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #215 on: January 09, 2016, 02:16:18 PM »
Have you whipped out "Dead skunk in the middle of the road" yet?

Wow! That is a new one for me.    I'll put it in the strategic reserve with Stafford's 'Last Chant' and Dionne with 'Do you know the way to San Jose'.   I've been saving them...........   Just in case. 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #216 on: January 09, 2016, 02:20:27 PM »
Wow! That is a new one for me.    I'll put it in the strategic reserve with Stafford's 'Last Chant' and Dionne with 'Do you know the way to San Jose'.   I've been saving them...........   Just in case.

Should those not work for some reason, I guarantee San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair by Scott McKenzie will.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #217 on: January 09, 2016, 02:25:53 PM »
Quote
FORT SMITH -- Charged with being involved in a conspiracy, which federal officials say knows no parallel for boldness, eight men, including three former officials of the United States internal revenue service, are to be tried during the term of United States court opening here tomorrow. The accusations against the defendants grow out of the moonshine operations of the J. C. Brewbaker distillery in this city.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #218 on: January 09, 2016, 02:43:27 PM »
Have you whipped out "Dead skunk in the middle of the road" yet?
LWIII's opus would certainly pair with C&T's 'Muskrat Love', a sure win!

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #219 on: January 09, 2016, 03:38:31 PM »
Damn - how did the thread miss that?

I actually saw it on the 3rd and then got distracted and forgot to post it. My bad.

births on this day

January 3
Maxene Andrews, American singer (The Andrews Sisters) (d. 1995)

Betty Furness, American actress and consumer activist (d. 1994)
Bernard Greenhouse, American cellist (d. 2011)
Warren King, American cartoonist (d. 1978)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #220 on: January 09, 2016, 03:45:27 PM »
January 9 Peter Twinn, English mathematician and WWII code-breaker (d. 2004)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #221 on: January 09, 2016, 07:15:06 PM »
 Battle of Gallipoli - April 25, 1915 to January 9, 1916
 


http://thefederalist-gary.blogspot.com/2012/04/battle-of-gallipoli-april-25-1915-to.html

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #222 on: January 09, 2016, 07:37:57 PM »
Nice one Rix

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #223 on: January 09, 2016, 07:43:50 PM »
Battle of Gallipoli - April 25, 1915 to January 9, 1916
 


http://thefederalist-gary.blogspot.com/2012/04/battle-of-gallipoli-april-25-1915-to.html

Wow.  That quote from Kemal Ataturk is a stunner.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #224 on: January 09, 2016, 08:58:37 PM »
Thanks, boys.  I've got some old vhs tapes on the battle and one of them ends with that quote.  Don't know who the narrator was but he spoke it so movingly that it never failed to make me all misty eyed.  Ataturk was quite a man.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #225 on: January 09, 2016, 11:52:51 PM »
Application filed August 4, 1909.  Patented February 22, 1916.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #226 on: January 10, 2016, 12:07:01 AM »
I wonder how much a signed copy of this would fetch?



Howard's dad?

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #227 on: January 10, 2016, 12:31:59 AM »
Application filed August 4, 1909.  Patented February 22, 1916.


Nice one, Rix! I cannot thank Willis Haviland "W.H." Carrier enough for inventing relief from enervating heat, humidity, and high dewpoints!  It's way past time the USPS commemorated his significant contribution to modern civilization by putting that handsome devil's face on a Forever stamp!

I have to admit, though, that at first glance it looked like a steam powered boom box! 



Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #228 on: January 10, 2016, 12:47:09 AM »
I wonder how much a signed copy of this would fetch?



Howard's dad?

Yes. Another great find!

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hughes_Tool_Company

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #229 on: January 10, 2016, 01:50:33 AM »
Nice one, Rix! I cannot thank Willis Haviland "W.H." Carrier enough for inventing relief from enervating heat, humidity, and high dewpoints!  It's way past time the USPS commemorated his significant contribution to modern civilization by putting that handsome devil's face on a Forever stamp!

I have to admit, though, that at first glance it looked like a steam powered boom box!

Well Robert, as Ronald Reagan once said, "There you go again."  Yet again you have taught me something new and I thank you very much.  Here I was picturing some old hermit that spent all his time assembling hoses and fans in his humid shack in the Okefenokee Swamp...until he just happened to hit on the correct combination of parts to make his tiny cabin more comfortable.  lol  Willis has an amazing story behind him.  His great great grandmother (if I read right) was hung for being a witch and his dad taught music to the Indians.  Would have loved to have visited Willis's igloo at the 1939 World's Fair in New York.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willis_Carrier


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #230 on: January 10, 2016, 05:23:07 AM »
Missed the hunnert yarn mark, methinks:



'pologies, Rix


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #231 on: January 10, 2016, 05:32:26 AM »
Missed the hunnert yarn mark, methinks:

'pologies, Rix

No prob. pate.  I'm sure there's a 1916 tie-in there somewhere.  ;)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #232 on: January 10, 2016, 10:14:05 AM »
On January 10th, 1916  Don Metz was born in Wilcox, Saskatchewan.    The village of Wilcox was only formed in 1907 and even today only has a population of around 300 people, so it must have been an interesting place to grow up in.

Metz would go on to play for the Toronto Maple Leafs and was his big moment in the sun was the 1942 Stanley Cup when he got hot and helped beat my beloved Red Wings.   Never a star, he shuttled between the NHL and the AHL and never played a complete season in the big leagues. 
However he did end up playing for 5 Stanley Cup winners.

http://www.thehockeynews.com/blog/don-metzs-cameos-always-paid-off-for-maple-leafs/

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #233 on: January 10, 2016, 12:35:42 PM »
His great great grandmother (if I read right) was hung for being a witch

Yeah, things usually didn't end well for people who ran afoul of Cotton Mather. Good for Martha for not admitting to or confessing anything!

"Cotton Mather denounced her as a 'rampant hag' whom the Devil had promised 'should be the queen of Hell.' She was arrested, convicted and, on August 19, 1692, hanged on Salem's Gallows Hill. Later it was recorded that of all the New Englanders charged with witchcraft, 'Martha Carrier was the only one, male or female, who did not at some time or other make an admission or confession.'"

I forget where, but I recently read a piece about him that described him as the first paranormal investigator in North America, because he collected stories of supernatural events allegedly caused by the Devil or his followers in the colonies and wrote accounts of them. I've read some of those in a book I have called America Begins, which is a fascinating collection of 17th Century essays and articles on a variety of subjects by prominent colonial figures of the time, and they're pretty wild.  Of course, he didn't personally witness any of the events, but he solemnly vouches for the veracity and "Godliness" of all the witnesses. Sounds like he would have made a great guest for Art back in the day!





Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #234 on: January 10, 2016, 12:58:41 PM »
Yeah, things usually didn't end well for people who ran afoul of Cotton Mather. Good for Martha for not admitting to or confessing anything!

"Cotton Mather denounced her as a 'rampant hag' whom the Devil had promised 'should be the queen of Hell.' She was arrested, convicted and, on August 19, 1692, hanged on Salem's Gallows Hill. Later it was recorded that of all the New Englanders charged with witchcraft, 'Martha Carrier was the only one, male or female, who did not at some time or other make an admission or confession.'"


I forget where, but I recently read a piece about him that described him as the first paranormal investigator in North America, because he collected stories of supernatural events allegedly caused by the Devil or his followers in the colonies and wrote accounts of them. I've read some of those in a book I have called America Begins, which is a fascinating collection of 17th Century essays and articles on a variety of subjects by prominent colonial figures of the time, and they're pretty wild.  Of course, he didn't personally witness any of the events, but he solemnly vouches for the veracity and "Godliness" of all the witnesses. Sounds like he would have made a great guest for Art back in the day!
If you have it handy who is the author or ISBN# etc of that book you mentioned "America Begins?" Sounds interesting. Thanks!

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #235 on: January 10, 2016, 01:07:49 PM »
If you have it handy who is the author or ISBN# etc of that book you mentioned "America Begins?" Sounds interesting. Thanks!

Here you go -- http://www.amazon.com/America-Begins-Early-American-Writings/dp/0253280206

If you like reading first person historical accounts, you should enjoy this. It's one of the few books from college I still have.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #236 on: January 10, 2016, 01:16:29 PM »
England lost a battleship. No loss of life, but two were injured.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #237 on: January 10, 2016, 01:18:59 PM »
Here you go -- http://www.amazon.com/America-Begins-Early-American-Writings/dp/0253280206

If you like reading first person historical accounts, you should enjoy this. It's one of the few books from college I still have.
Thanks!

On today (though not 100 years ago:) "the greatest ever [victory] secured by the Cross against Islam" (well, one of, at least.)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Vaslui

Something I've often pondered. We have A/C now (looking at those posts above) but society gets more and more "casual" with dress. I can't imagine how people lived back before A/C was invented and then cheap enough wearing suits, long dresses, etc everywhere. I guess you "get used to it" which is somewhat true and it also could be that our over use of A/C screws up our natural ability to deal with it? I know some places (universities, libraries, doctor's offices) put it down so cold that when you go outside even when it is marginally hot it feels like the Congo and you start sweating.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #238 on: January 10, 2016, 01:48:30 PM »
On January 10th, 1916  Don Metz was born in Wilcox, Saskatchewan.    The village of Wilcox was only formed in 1907 and even today only has a population of around 300 people, so it must have been an interesting place to grow up in.

Metz would go on to play for the Toronto Maple Leafs and was his big moment in the sun was the 1942 Stanley Cup when he got hot and helped beat my beloved Red Wings.   Never a star, he shuttled between the NHL and the AHL and never played a complete season in the big leagues. 
However he did end up playing for 5 Stanley Cup winners.

http://www.thehockeynews.com/blog/don-metzs-cameos-always-paid-off-for-maple-leafs/

Thanks, Walks, great article on Don.  Just the type of player I would of been a fan of had I lived an earlier life.  I bet he grew great wheat!

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #239 on: January 10, 2016, 01:49:33 PM »
Two items from the Tacoma Times a hundred years ago today.  It seems Prohibition is still a little damp.
Also, taking the streetcar to go ice-skating, then gathering around the fire for hot chocolate!