Author Marijuana  (Read 26117 times)

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Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #180 on: January 25, 2014, 06:30:54 PM »
Now that a majority of Americans support legalizing marijuana, I'm pissed.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/majority-of-americans-now-support-legal-pot-poll-says/

I want reparations for my brothers and sisters being harassed, disenfranchised, disemployed, fined, and jailed for all these ignorant, dark, and prejudiced years. Oh, I don't know, a few billion dollars maybe, preferential hiring, priority airline boarding, free doritos for life, jail a cop day, mandatory weed growing, and etc.  Yes, there will be more stoners and fucked up stoner stories for a while just like when you hold your farts they make a bigger noise in the end. Fuck you jack-booted war on vegetable thugs and all that have supported, ignored, and profited from your enforcer bullshit. Let my people grow you pussy loser tight assed motherfucking haters. And pay up assholes!

Am I kidding?


Unfortunately just because a law becomes new law that changes the old one, and some special constitutional clause that prevents just this such action from occurring.  The people in jail for marijuana charges will most likely NOT be released.  They still broke the law, just because the law isn't law anymore, they don't get clemency for their previous transgressions unfortunately.  I don't agree with it so it sucks no doubt.     

Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #181 on: January 25, 2014, 06:50:44 PM »
i would remind everyone that mj (sadly) is still illegal under federal law. should the feds decide to they can pursue possession and/or distribution charges under federal law. the current regime has chosen not to. the next commandant in chief may think otherwise.

Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #182 on: January 26, 2014, 04:28:40 PM »
The people in jail for marijuana charges will most likely NOT be released.  They still broke the law, just because the law isn't law anymore, they don't get clemency for their previous transgressions unfortunately.

I think that anyone in jail for marijuana charges alone, those charges should be dropped and clemency given.


Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #183 on: January 26, 2014, 05:29:57 PM »
I think that anyone in jail for marijuana charges alone, those charges should be dropped and clemency given.
i agree.


Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #185 on: January 26, 2014, 05:49:02 PM »
Food for thought:

http://www.thefix.com/content/study-shows-parents%E2%80%99-marijuana-use-may-spur-addiction-children

Things have changed over the years. At one time addiction was considered a physiological response to the need for certain substances that had been abused, opiates, alcohol and benzodiazepines and maybe a few others... not sure. But over the last several decades addiction has included emotional/psychological dependence as well.

Since that is now the standard, it is fairly obvious that learned behaviors from the environment would easily migrate to the children of parents that are abusing non-"addictive" substances such as marijuana and cocaine.

Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #186 on: January 26, 2014, 05:53:26 PM »
I think that anyone in jail for marijuana charges alone, those charges should be dropped and clemency given.

They should, particularly here in NY where we had the harsh Rockefeller drug laws which mandated 15 years to life for 2 ounces of weed. Unfortunately, even with dropped charges and clemency, those people's lives and futures have been irrevocably ruined because of pandering to voters who wanted strict drug laws without regard to the particulars of the drug.

Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #187 on: January 26, 2014, 06:03:52 PM »
I'd support marijuana legalization across the board. But I'd actually be for illegalizing gambling again; we legalized it here in Missouri and it's turned into this huge undefeatable lobby that can seemingly exempt itself from any state or local laws it wants. I don't think anyone predicted that outcome when we were debating the wisdom of legalizing it years ago. Plus it seems to only have a downside, few win, lots lose and many blow their SS check and spend the rest of the month in the pawnshops. Doesn't seem constructive to me.

Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #188 on: January 26, 2014, 06:52:07 PM »
I'd support marijuana legalization across the board. But I'd actually be for illegalizing gambling again; we legalized it here in Missouri and it's turned into this huge undefeatable lobby that can seemingly exempt itself from any state or local laws it wants. I don't think anyone predicted that outcome when we were debating the wisdom of legalizing it years ago. Plus it seems to only have a downside, few win, lots lose and many blow their SS check and spend the rest of the month in the pawnshops. Doesn't seem constructive to me.

i agree. but i would not illegalize gambling, i would make it so that the lobbyists are basically powerless, perhaps through political campaign laws.

Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #189 on: January 26, 2014, 06:58:05 PM »
Things have changed over the years. At one time addiction was considered a physiological response to the need for certain substances that had been abused, opiates, alcohol and benzodiazepines and maybe a few others... not sure. But over the last several decades addiction has included emotional/psychological dependence as well.

Since that is now the standard, it is fairly obvious that learned behaviors from the environment would easily migrate to the children of parents that are abusing non-"addictive" substances such as marijuana and cocaine.

I believe the study is suggesing that pot use by adolescents may be passed along to children later in life and that the changes are heriditary, not learned. I'm not sure of the methodology, but if further studies show the same, it could prove devestaing to the legalization movement. Of course, that may be the intent.


Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #190 on: January 27, 2014, 12:51:12 AM »
i agree. but i would not illegalize gambling, i would make it so that the lobbyists are basically powerless, perhaps through political campaign laws.

I'd accept that solution, sure.

Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #191 on: January 27, 2014, 01:07:13 AM »
You can't legislate morality. All gambling, All drugs, All prostitution should be legal.

Want to mainline some smack? Well, come on down to CVS Pharmacy, and get your hypodermic needles and pharmaceutical pure heroin here!

Need a whore? Well, hit the speed dial on your phone, and Angie, the neighborhood licensed whore shows up in 10 minutes. Perfectly legal, perfectly clean and sanctioned.


Then, after a good day of doping and whoring, you may want to take in a little gambling. So, take a stroll down to your neighborhood casino.

Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #192 on: January 27, 2014, 03:11:05 AM »
I'd support marijuana legalization across the board. But I'd actually be for illegalizing gambling again; we legalized it here in Missouri and it's turned into this huge undefeatable lobby that can seemingly exempt itself from any state or local laws it wants. I don't think anyone predicted that outcome when we were debating the wisdom of legalizing it years ago. Plus it seems to only have a downside, few win, lots lose and many blow their SS check and spend the rest of the month in the pawnshops. Doesn't seem constructive to me.

In the UK, gambling is strictly regulated. Bookies can't 'just' open anywhere, they have to apply to the local council for a betting licence. And all gambling is taxed too, either at the point of stake or after payout, (naturally most punters choose stake). On the horses it's (and has been for years) 10%. There was a move (and heavily lobbied) in the last government to have 'super casinos' in parts of the UK, in the large cities. But it was dropped because the respective cities' populations didn't want them.
It isn't to say we don't have the addicted gamblers who have lost everything, their homes, jobs, families and self respect, and every time a  new way of gambling comes on stream (online poker being one) there are the anti gambling lobbyists giving there views and the inherent dangers.

All addictions start from the first step. I'm told that heroin is in actual fact very difficult to get addicted to, because the first few times taking it can result in profuse vomiting and cramps. Tobacco on the other hand can be instantly addictive: and it's a fair argument to say if it was discovered today, it would be made illegal by almost all countries. The tobacco industry is a massive lobby, and although governments pay lip service to the obvious and irrefutable harm it can do, they get lot of revenue from it, so can't be too onerous. The UK had a phase of pushing for plain cig packets, backed by all the medical bodies and a great deal of cross party MP's.

The PM just happens to have as an advisor an ex employee of one of the tobacco companies, and the PM (Cameron) is reported to have had something like thirty meetings with representatives from the tobacco industry, and less than half that from the health lobby. It shouldn't come as any surprise that the proposal to have plain packaging was quietly dropped from the agenda: This is in spite of the tobacco lobby insisting that branding makes no difference to encouraging kids or anyone else to take up smoking..funny that eh?

Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #193 on: January 27, 2014, 05:42:14 AM »
I've known several people who were heroin users.  Each told me separately, that they were really addicted to alcohol and did heroin only when it was available and alcohol was not.  I took that to mean heroin was in the room with them at that moment and alcohol was not.

Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #194 on: January 27, 2014, 01:20:26 PM »
In the UK, gambling is strictly regulated. Bookies can't 'just' open anywhere, they have to apply to the local council for a betting licence. And all gambling is taxed too, either at the point of stake or after payout, (naturally most punters choose stake). On the horses it's (and has been for years) 10%. There was a move (and heavily lobbied) in the last government to have 'super casinos' in parts of the UK, in the large cities. But it was dropped because the respective cities' populations didn't want them.
It isn't to say we don't have the addicted gamblers who have lost everything, their homes, jobs, families and self respect, and every time a  new way of gambling comes on stream (online poker being one) there are the anti gambling lobbyists giving there views and the inherent dangers.

All addictions start from the first step. I'm told that heroin is in actual fact very difficult to get addicted to, because the first few times taking it can result in profuse vomiting and cramps. Tobacco on the other hand can be instantly addictive: and it's a fair argument to say if it was discovered today, it would be made illegal by almost all countries. The tobacco industry is a massive lobby, and although governments pay lip service to the obvious and irrefutable harm it can do, they get lot of revenue from it, so can't be too onerous. The UK had a phase of pushing for plain cig packets, backed by all the medical bodies and a great deal of cross party MP's.

The PM just happens to have as an advisor an ex employee of one of the tobacco companies, and the PM (Cameron) is reported to have had something like thirty meetings with representatives from the tobacco industry, and less than half that from the health lobby. It shouldn't come as any surprise that the proposal to have plain packaging was quietly dropped from the agenda: This is in spite of the tobacco lobby insisting that branding makes no difference to encouraging kids or anyone else to take up smoking..funny that eh?

It's regulated here ... in theory. It can only be done on a riverboat and it's heavily taxed ostensibly going to the schools. In practice the lobby has bought off so many people that they've exempted themselves from just about everything. One of the things they're exempt from, incidentally, are interior smoking bans.

Oddly, I'm not sure we ever illegalized horse gambling, or at least nearby Illinois didn't. It's never shown itself to be a problem. It's the slot machines and card games that are causing people to go broke.

In the US the tobacco lobby was largely broken. It's one of the most highly regulated and taxed things we have. Personally, I think we should probably ease off a bit on it.

But, yes, I'm aware of Cameron's connections. He's not the only one, Boris Johnson's been out advocating smoking sections be brought back to airplanes for years. What a mayor has to do with airline policy, I'll never know, but he's out there none the less.

Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #195 on: January 27, 2014, 01:37:54 PM »
Boris Johnson's been out advocating smoking sections be brought back to airplanes for years. What a mayor has to do with airline policy, I'll never know, but he's out there none the less.

Boris is the Marmite man; He's seen equally a buffoon and a genius. Although he's the Mayor of London, and therefore disqualified from holding office as an MP, he has designs on being the next leader of the Tories..I cannot see him being taken seriously as a statesman in the UK let alone in the UN, NATO or the G20..He's just not that man. But stranger things have happened.

Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #196 on: January 27, 2014, 02:06:56 PM »
Boris is the Marmite man; He's seen equally a buffoon and a genius. Although he's the Mayor of London, and therefore disqualified from holding office as an MP, he has designs on being the next leader of the Tories..I cannot see him being taken seriously as a statesman in the UK let alone in the UN, NATO or the G20..He's just not that man. But stranger things have happened.

He'd have to start using a comb.

Re: States, Legalized Pot, and Children
« Reply #197 on: January 30, 2014, 02:49:49 AM »
This is on our news right now...


Whole life terms for pot, and ONLY pot? Jeeze, and who talks about the 'third world'? This is draconian.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-25832120

marijuana is perfect, isn't it?
« Reply #198 on: September 16, 2014, 08:49:41 AM »
Ok pot heads... tell me how pure and harmless pot is.  Makes you smarter and more focused, right?

Yes, this clip is from FOX news:

http://video.foxnews.com/v/3786643350001/devastating-effects-of-teen-marijuana-use/#sp=show-clips

Re: marijuana is perfect, isn't it?
« Reply #199 on: September 16, 2014, 08:58:49 AM »
I can't remember anything that I did from 1992 to 2012 but I had a blast doing it. I think.

Re: marijuana is perfect, isn't it?
« Reply #200 on: September 16, 2014, 10:33:29 AM »
Uh, what were we talking aboot?
[attachimg=1]

Re: marijuana is perfect, isn't it?
« Reply #201 on: September 16, 2014, 10:51:29 AM »
Ok pot heads... tell me how pure and harmless pot is.  Makes you smarter and more focused, right?

Yes, this clip is from FOX news:

http://video.foxnews.com/v/3786643350001/devastating-effects-of-teen-marijuana-use/#sp=show-clips

Ah, this is a common sight; FOX News pandering to its base...  a collection of fuckwits who are as uneducated as they are self-righteous.

People who smoke week are 60% less likely to finish High School.

Well, I guess Bill O'Reilly would never misrepresent a statistic in order to push an agenda, so yeah, this must be a clear cut case of cause and effect.

Bad Weed... that's a BAD Weed!

 ::)

Re: marijuana is perfect, isn't it?
« Reply #202 on: September 16, 2014, 11:12:31 AM »
How many shows has Bill O done about the evils of alcohol? How many experts have been on his show to scare people with booze statistics as it relates to kids?
Think of the children. ::)

Re: marijuana is perfect, isn't it?
« Reply #203 on: September 16, 2014, 11:29:42 AM »
Since pot was legalized in my fair state, and the war on tobacco continues to rage, I find it amusing how the aroma of skunk weed wafts through the air in the street, at sporting events, in public parks... and no one seems to mind.  If you light up a cigarette anywhere in the city, you are scowled at as though you have punted a cute dog through an open window.  So let me get this straight... cigarette smoke is full of toxic carcinogens and chemicals and should be eradicated.  Marijuana smoke is full of nutrients and life sustaining sunshine.  Ok. 

You know what I really love about marijuana?  It hobbles my competition.  Every other guitar tech I know smokes barnfulls of the stuff.  It kills their ambition and makes them complacent in their mediocrity.  It clouds their minds, dulls their judgement, and shrinks their penises.  I just love that.  Smoke up, suckers!

Re: marijuana is perfect, isn't it?
« Reply #204 on: September 16, 2014, 11:35:35 AM »
How many shows has Bill O done about the evils of alcohol? How many experts have been on his show to scare people with booze statistics as it relates to kids?
Think of the children. ::)

Or the evils of "one-sided phone sex"


Re: marijuana is perfect, isn't it?
« Reply #205 on: September 16, 2014, 12:08:25 PM »
Getting pot smokers to hate pot is easy, just have Philip Morris or Starbucks or ahhhh Walmart produce and sell it. It's inevitable the industry will be taken over by corporations once it's legal. Then "big pot" will be the devil and they'll all have to to turn to something else to take them away from reality. Or even worse make them choose between a paper or plastic bag when they buy it, their heads will explode.

Re: marijuana is perfect, isn't it?
« Reply #206 on: September 16, 2014, 12:52:01 PM »
Or the evils of "onside phone sex"

Indeed. For the record, I don't smoke. What bothers me is the mj debate. How it's being framed & what it can do to kids is, IMO, bordering on hysteria. It's based on old perceptions and propaganda of weed being evil & worse than booze. I don't want kids to smoke or drink,   because it dulls motivations and turns SOME kids, the individuals who can't control themselves, into zombies and idiots. I think it's disingenuous and an example of using the "won't someone think of the children" tactic, just to scare people.

Re: marijuana is perfect, isn't it?
« Reply #207 on: September 16, 2014, 01:16:07 PM »
I think ALL drugs should be perfectly legal (with a few exceptions made for antibiotics, heart meds,etc.) for recreational use by the public. Treat it all like alcohol.

With regard to marijuana, I have no interest in it, but an old war buddy of mine, who got nicked up pretty good overseas, uses it to alleviate pain and stress. He swears by it. In fact, he has come off of some pretty heavy duty medications. Too bad the V.A. won`t touch it.

Re: marijuana is perfect, isn't it?
« Reply #208 on: September 16, 2014, 01:18:07 PM »
I've studied the brain quite a bit as an undergraduate, and I've found that anytime you throw the brain's chemistry out of a natural range -- even through lifestyle habits, but mostly through drugs or alcohol -- it causes long term problems.  The brain has to compensate and gets thrown out of balance long term.  Neurons that never regenerate die due to over-stimulation, something which is usually localized in an affected part of the brain and causes specific personality deficits rather than just a general dulling of cognition.  Just anecdotally I find that people with a history of pot use have a reduced sense of how their behaviors affect others and impaired abilities in logic.  I'm sorry if this is offensive.  I'm not trying to get on anyone's case.  But we got along fine without marijuana for millennia, and for most people it has no purpose other than providing yet another form of escape from their responsibilities.  What exactly is the benefit of including pot in society?  Why do we need it?

Re: marijuana is perfect, isn't it?
« Reply #209 on: September 16, 2014, 01:43:06 PM »
People who smoke week are 60% less likely to finish High School.

if someone cites this statistic, it's like they're suggesting the pro legalization crowd wants high schoolers to be out getting high.  i don't know of any legitimate participant in the legalization movement that wants this.  marc, this is like your 30th anti marijuana thread on this forum over the years, and i have to ask, why is this stuck in your craw, of all the things one could be upset about?