Author Hurricane Irma  (Read 9283 times)

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Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #90 on: September 05, 2017, 07:19:20 PM »
I get irritated by headlines like "Irma is the Atlantic's strongest hurricane ever!"  How long have they been measuring windspeed in the Atlantic? 50, 60 years?  Sure, probably going back to 1900 for those that actually hit the US but those out in the middle of the Atlantic.  Please just ignore those headlines.  That is a pet peeve of mine.

If Irma is the strongest hurricane in 100 years, that's impressive enough to make headline news. Especially considering the resources still needed in Texas from the aftermath of Harvey--not even 2 weeks ago. Right now Irma is churning towards Puerto Rico, an American territory who will also require FEMA assistance, in addition to Florida or other states in its path.

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #91 on: September 05, 2017, 07:23:58 PM »
Latest from Forecaster Pasch on Irma and the latest from Forecaster Landsea on Jose just behind her.

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #92 on: September 05, 2017, 07:24:38 PM »
If Irma is the strongest hurricane in 100 years, that's impressive enough to make headline news. Especially considering the resources still needed in Texas from the aftermath of Harvey--not even 2 weeks ago. Right now Irma is churning towards Puerto Rico, an American territory who will also require FEMA assistance, in addition to Florida or other states in its path.

US Virgin Islands is bound to be involved as well...........


Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #93 on: September 05, 2017, 08:52:26 PM »

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #94 on: September 05, 2017, 09:01:30 PM »
If Irma is the strongest hurricane in 100 years, that's impressive enough to make headline news. Especially considering the resources still needed in Texas from the aftermath of Harvey--not even 2 weeks ago. Right now Irma is churning towards Puerto Rico, an American territory who will also require FEMA assistance, in addition to Florida or other states in its path.

Andrew in '92 and Camille in '69 were also Cat 5 hurricanes as was the 1935 hurricane that was not named.  That's not to say there weren't other Cat 5's in the Atlantic but those are the ones that hit the US proper.   Puerto Rico is not looking to be a direct hit at this time but it will get some part of the storm probably winds under 100 there.  Everybody needs out prayers and well wishes no matter where they are.  Let this be the Bellgab Intent experiment.  Let's move Irma to the North.  If Art, Noory and Hoagland gave it a shot in the past, I'm willing to give it one as well.

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #95 on: September 05, 2017, 09:06:44 PM »
Richard Branson not leaving his private island (Necker Island.) Though I'm sure he likely has better facilities than your average Caribbean resident in which to hunker down in the storm. His house there was burned down during Irene so still a bit surprising he wouldn't bug out considering the size of this storm.

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #96 on: September 05, 2017, 10:44:05 PM »
As far as prepping for emergencies, I'm surprised to still see people rush out at the last minute buying cases of individual bottled water. If each bottle is about 10 oz, a case of 24 bottles is about 2 gallons, which won't last long in an emergency. Plus the extra expense of individual bottles and the plastic waste makes no sense. I always have at least 3-4, 3 Gal bottles of water on hand, in case of emergency.

Also, no excuses for people who complain about not being able to find batteries and a generator days before an expected storm. Rechargeable and regular batteries, water, radio, non-perishable foods, campstove, etc. are essential supplies no matter where you live. I went without power for 14 days after a storm and my first mistake was having no ground coffee. After the first day of the storm I tried to smash coffee beans with a hammer, bought a hand grinder after that.

Conversely there's the over-preppers, like those who cashed in on C2C before 2000, 2012. Out of all Art's "prepper" guests, I remember one guy who talked about basic, common sense prepping for emergencies. It's not that difficult or expensive.

Anyhoo, I hope people in Irma's path stay safe and that she fizzles out with minimal damage.

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #97 on: September 05, 2017, 10:46:14 PM »
Andrew in '92 and Camille in '69 were also Cat 5 hurricanes as was the 1935 hurricane that was not named.  That's not to say there weren't other Cat 5's in the Atlantic but those are the ones that hit the US proper.   Puerto Rico is not looking to be a direct hit at this time but it will get some part of the storm probably winds under 100 there.  Everybody needs out prayers and well wishes no matter where they are.  Let this be the Bellgab Intent experiment.  Let's move Irma to the North.  If Art, Noory and Hoagland gave it a shot in the past, I'm willing to give it one as well.

The 1935 Labor Day hurricane skipped up the gulf coast of Florida...this might do the same.

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #98 on: September 05, 2017, 10:50:40 PM »
As far as prepping for emergencies, I'm surprised to still see people rush out at the last minute buying cases of individual bottled water. If each bottle is about 10 oz, a case of 24 bottles is about 2 gallons, which won't last long in an emergency. Plus the extra expense of individual bottles and the plastic waste makes no sense. I always have at least 3-4, 3 Gal bottles of water on hand, in case of emergency.

Also, no excuses for people who complain about not being able to find batteries and a generator days before an expected storm. Rechargeable and regular batteries, water, radio, non-perishable foods, campstove, etc. are essential supplies no matter where you live. I went without power for 14 days after a storm and my first mistake was having no ground coffee. After the first day of the storm I tried to smash coffee beans with a hammer, bought a hand grinder after that.

Conversely there's the over-preppers, like those who cashed in on C2C before 2000, 2012. Out of all Art's "prepper" guests, I remember one guy who talked about basic, common sense prepping for emergencies. It's not that difficult or expensive.

Anyhoo, I hope people in Irma's path stay safe and that she fizzles out with minimal damage.
Yeah some folks on the coast still without power the big complaint was no coffee. I seriously was saying "you don't even have some instant Nescafe or something around." It costs a buck for the individual single-cup coffee pack of 12 and if you go larger size even cheaper and lasts, basically, a long time especially if not opened? I buy them because I don't mind instant coffee and also "wtf, only a buck" so always have some on hand.

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #99 on: September 05, 2017, 10:59:40 PM »
Yeah some folks on the coast still without power the big complaint was no coffee. I seriously was saying "you don't even have some instant Nescafe or something around." It costs a buck for the individual single-cup coffee pack of 12 and if you go larger size even cheaper and lasts, basically, a long time especially if not opened? I buy them because I don't mind instant coffee and also "wtf, only a buck" so always have some on hand.

Well I'm a coffee snob and instant is unacceptable, even in an emergency, I want a decent cup of coffee. Potable water, a campstove, beans and a hand grinder--I'm set. ☕️

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #100 on: September 05, 2017, 11:32:04 PM »
Well I'm a coffee snob and instant is unacceptable, even in an emergency, I want a decent cup of coffee. Potable water, a campstove, beans and a hand grinder--I'm set. ☕️
Ha! I admire the refusal to stoop to lesser products- despite conditions. They needed you down at the coast near ground zero! It is funny, not ha-ha though, the various guests over the years on C2C have said things like coffee, tobacco products, drugs (legal for medicine or for other,) TP, are things lots of "preppers" don't think about but people will need or even fight to get in worst cases. Another "key" item, just for travel especially in some countries, are those baby-wipe things. Cheap and can come in very handy. And now they have small packs, even individual packs. Not to be crude but "saved my ass" on a train in Hungary years ago. (Many countries in Asia and even in Europe, don't provide paper in many cases and so along with odd foods and weird public conveniences- in this case an open hole over the RR tracks in a cold winter- hello, that wakes you up- it is well worth to have on hand.)

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #101 on: September 06, 2017, 01:13:56 AM »
US Virgin Islands

St.Thomas...St. John...and Adjacent Islands-
131 AM AST Wed Sep 6 2017

...HURRICANE WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT...

* LOCATIONS AFFECTED
    - St Thomas St John and adjacent islands

* WIND
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Equivalent Cat 4 Hurricane force wind
        - Peak Wind Forecast: 110-130 mph with gusts to 145 mph
        - Window for Tropical Storm force winds: until early Thursday
          morning
        - Window for Hurricane force winds: this morning until this
          evening

    - CURRENT THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: Extreme
        - The wind threat has remained nearly steady from the
          previous assessment.
        - Remain braced against the reasonable threat for major
          hurricane force wind greater than 110 mph of equivalent
          Category 3 intensity or higher.
        - To be safe, efforts should fully focus on protecting life.
          Properties remain subject to devastating to catastrophic
          wind impacts.
        - Now is the time to urgently hide from the wind. Failure to
          adequately shelter may result in serious injury, loss of
          life, or immense human suffering. Remain sheltered until
          the hazardous wind subsides. Be ready to quickly move to
          the safest place within your shelter if extreme wind
          warnings are issued.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Unfolding
        - Potential impacts from the main wind event are unfolding.

* STORM SURGE
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Life-threatening storm surge possible
        - Peak Storm Surge Inundation: The potential for 7-11 feet
          above ground somewhere within surge prone areas
        - Window of concern: through Thursday morning

    - CURRENT THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: Extreme
        - The storm surge threat has remained nearly steady from the
          previous assessment.
        - Emergency plans should include a reasonable threat for
          extreme storm surge flooding greater than 9 feet above
          ground.
        - To be safe, aggressively prepare for the potential of
          devastating to catastrophic storm surge flooding impacts.
          Evacuation efforts should now be brought to completion.
          Evacuations must be complete before driving conditions
          become unsafe.
        - Life-threatening inundation is possible. Failure to heed
          evacuation orders may result in serious injury, significant
          loss of life, or immense human suffering. Leave if
          evacuation orders are given for your area. Consider
          voluntary evacuation if recommended. Poor decisions may
          result in being cut off or needlessly risk lives.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Devastating to Catastrophic
        - Widespread deep inundation, with storm surge flooding
          greatly accentuated by powerful battering waves. Structural
          damage to buildings, with many washing away. Damage greatly
          compounded from considerable floating debris. Locations may
          be uninhabitable for an extended period.
        - Near-shore escape routes and secondary roads washed out or
          severely flooded. Flood control systems and barriers may
          become stressed.
        - Extreme beach erosion. New shoreline cuts possible.
        - Massive damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers.
          Numerous small craft broken away from moorings with many
          lifted onshore and stranded.

* FLOODING RAIN
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Flash Flood Watch is in effect
        - Peak Rainfall Amounts: Additional 6-10 inches, with locally
          higher amounts

    - CURRENT THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: High
        - The flooding rain threat has remained nearly steady from
          the previous assessment.
        - Emergency considerations should include a threat of
          flooding.
        - Be safe and remain ready to protect against flooding rain
          impacts.
        - If flood related watches and warnings are in effect, heed
          recommended actions.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Extensive
        - Major rainfall flooding may prompt many evacuations and
          rescues.
        - Rivers and tributaries may rapidly overflow their banks in
          multiple places. Small streams, creeks, canals, arroyos,
          and ditches may become dangerous rivers. In mountain areas,
          destructive runoff may run quickly down valleys while
          increasing susceptibility to rockslides and mudslides.
          Flood control systems and barriers may become stressed.
        - Flood waters can enter many structures within multiple
          communities, some structures becoming uninhabitable or
          washed away. Many places where flood waters may cover
          escape routes. Streets and parking lots become rivers of
          moving water with underpasses submerged. Driving conditions
          become dangerous. Many road and bridge closures with some
          weakened or washed out.

* TORNADO
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST:
        - Situation is somewhat favorable for tornadoes

    - CURRENT THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: Elevated

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #102 on: September 06, 2017, 01:32:16 AM »
(Tropical Storm) Jose is coming after Irma ...

https://www.accuweather.com/en/hurricane/atlantic/jose-2017

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #103 on: September 06, 2017, 03:56:11 AM »

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #104 on: September 06, 2017, 05:48:58 AM »

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #105 on: September 06, 2017, 08:30:41 AM »
Some of you gabbers would be happy here today.  My local grocery store (one of only two on the island) is out of bottled water. Employees say two trucks will arrive today loaded with nothing but water. They don't know exactly what time the trucks will arrive, so customers are yelling at them. It reminds me of a Bellgab panic.

People don't seem to know that water comes out of the tap, and if there's a real emergency, they can fill every container they have with water from the tap. Or heaven forbid, save the gallon jugs that your organic, caffeine-free, gluten-free, ginsing-honey tea came in. Then fill those with water.

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #106 on: September 06, 2017, 08:55:06 AM »
Get ready for the "Florida Strong" meme.



Nothing like evacuating most of a state.


Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #107 on: September 06, 2017, 11:23:10 AM »

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #108 on: September 06, 2017, 11:25:48 AM »
Anyone notice there's another hurricane forming right behind Erma? Wellthere is.


Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #109 on: September 06, 2017, 11:55:04 AM »
Some of you gabbers would be happy here today.  My local grocery store (one of only two on the island) is out of bottled water. Employees say two trucks will arrive today loaded with nothing but water. They don't know exactly what time the trucks will arrive, so customers are yelling at them. It reminds me of a Bellgab panic.

People don't seem to know that water comes out of the tap, and if there's a real emergency, they can fill every container they have with water from the tap. Or heaven forbid, save the gallon jugs that your organic, caffeine-free, gluten-free, ginsing-honey tea came in. Then fill those with water.
Lock n' Load Jack, those can really get bad!

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #110 on: September 06, 2017, 11:56:47 AM »
Anyone notice there's another hurricane forming right behind Erma? Wellthere is.




I noticed it a few hours ago.  If it follows Irma's path, it likely won't be strong.

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #111 on: September 06, 2017, 11:57:51 AM »



I think the conspiracy theorists should go clear up the mess. They seem to have enough time on their hands to make YT videos about conspiracy theories.

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #112 on: September 06, 2017, 11:57:56 AM »

I noticed it a few hours ago.  If it follows Irma's path, it likely won't be strong.

They'll make it stronger.  :)

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #113 on: September 06, 2017, 11:58:32 AM »

I noticed it a few hours ago.  If it follows Irma's path, it likely won't be strong.

So far its a tropical storm.

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #114 on: September 06, 2017, 11:58:45 AM »

I think the conspiracy theorists should go clear up the mess. They seem to have enough time on their hands to make YT videos about conspiracy theories.

Once again, no specific criticism though?  :D

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #115 on: September 06, 2017, 11:59:18 AM »
They'll make it stronger.  :)

"They'?  ;D

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #116 on: September 06, 2017, 12:00:22 PM »
Once again, no specific criticism though?  :D

Of what? It isn't worth commentating on anything any CT's fetid imagination can come up with. Getting a fucking job might work best for them.

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #117 on: September 06, 2017, 12:02:55 PM »

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #118 on: September 06, 2017, 12:04:46 PM »
Yeah, them.


Ooooooo....NOT.....Them?!!!!

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #119 on: September 06, 2017, 12:05:17 PM »
Of what? It isn't worth commentating on anything any CT's fetid imagination can come up with. Getting a fucking job might work best for them.

Yes, we're all well aware of your intellectual capacity. You can throw poo and...that's about it. Good luck, monkey.  ;D