Author Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary  (Read 2814 times)

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Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« on: March 23, 2016, 01:49:42 PM »

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2016, 02:07:33 PM »

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2016, 03:43:39 PM »
I'm in on this thread, way cool S.L.  I enjoy fossils and will be happy to scan some of the flatter ones for your comment and enjoyment.  ;)


Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2016, 07:35:42 PM »
i used to work here

http://www.spectrum-scientifics.com/Geology-s/2031.htm

and got a ton of cool stuff

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2016, 06:36:28 AM »
Thanks guys. :)  I'll try to keep it interesting.

ToGo packs and getting started.  http://www.americangeode.com/rockhounding.php

Texans - you have some interesting geology.

                                               

LLanite: http://www.minsocam.org/msa/collectors_corner/arc/qtzllano.htm Found nowhere else in the world.
http://www.yourgemologist.com/llanite.html   
http://www.lib.utexas.edu/search/search.php?filter=1&query=llanite

http://maps.thefullwiki.org/Llanite  https://www.etsy.com/search?q=llanite
         

http://hubpages.com/education/Rocks-and-Mineral-found-in-Texas

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2016, 07:04:04 AM »
More in Texas:
Fossilized human dinosaur tracks. http://theelusiveguanaco.blogspot.com/2012/10/did-humans-walk-with-dinosaurs-look-at.html

         

Figure1. Map showing locations of dinosaur tracks in the Glen Rose Formation of Central Texas (Modified from Langston, 1974). Scale in miles.

Figure 2. Map showing the locations of Quaternary localities mentioned in the text. 1) Kyle site, Hill Country; 2) Laubach Cave, Williamson County; 3) Fyllan Cave, Travis County; 4) Mac's Cave, Travis County, 5) Barton Road site, Travis County; 6) Levi Shelter, Travis County; 7) Longhorn Cavern, Burnet County; 8) Miller's Cave, Llano County; 9) Wunderlich site, Comal County; 10) Friesenhahn Cave, Bexar County; 11) Cave Without a Name, Kendall County; 12) Kincaid Shelter, Uvalde County; 13) Rattlesnake Cave, Kinney County; 14) Felton Cave, Sutton County; 15) Centipede Cave, Val Verde County; 16) Damp Cave, Val Verde County; 17) Cueva Quebrada, Val Verde County; 18) Bonfire Cave, Val Verde County. Scale in miles.

Figure 3. Map showing modern distributions of Synaptomys cooperi (vertical lines) and late Pleistocene occurrences in Texas and Mexico. Scale in miles.

Figure 4. Map showing modern distributions of Cynomys ludovicianus (vertical lines) and Tamias striatus (horizontal lines), and the locations of Schulze Cave and Friesenhahn Cave (filled circles), where both occur in Pleistocene faunas. Scale in miles.

Figure 5. Map showing the modern distributions of Mustela erminea (horizontal lines) and Reithrodontomys fulvescens (vertical lines), and the location of Schulze Cave (filled circle), where both occur in a Pleistocene fauna. Scale in miles.

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/geo/balcones_escarpment/pages41-50.html?p=print

I'd start an OOParts thread, but I've got too many going as it is.  :-\
http://www.genesispark.com/exhibits/evidence/historical/ancient/dinosaur/
http://www.genesispark.com/exhibits/evidence/paleontological/footprints/

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2016, 07:04:17 AM »
More in Texas:
Fossilized human dinosaur tracks. http://theelusiveguanaco.blogspot.com/2012/10/did-humans-walk-with-dinosaurs-look-at.html

         

Figure1. Map showing locations of dinosaur tracks in the Glen Rose Formation of Central Texas (Modified from Langston, 1974). Scale in miles.

Figure 2. Map showing the locations of Quaternary localities mentioned in the text. 1) Kyle site, Hill Country; 2) Laubach Cave, Williamson County; 3) Fyllan Cave, Travis County; 4) Mac's Cave, Travis County, 5) Barton Road site, Travis County; 6) Levi Shelter, Travis County; 7) Longhorn Cavern, Burnet County; 8) Miller's Cave, Llano County; 9) Wunderlich site, Comal County; 10) Friesenhahn Cave, Bexar County; 11) Cave Without a Name, Kendall County; 12) Kincaid Shelter, Uvalde County; 13) Rattlesnake Cave, Kinney County; 14) Felton Cave, Sutton County; 15) Centipede Cave, Val Verde County; 16) Damp Cave, Val Verde County; 17) Cueva Quebrada, Val Verde County; 18) Bonfire Cave, Val Verde County. Scale in miles.

Figure 3. Map showing modern distributions of Synaptomys cooperi (vertical lines) and late Pleistocene occurrences in Texas and Mexico. Scale in miles.

Figure 4. Map showing modern distributions of Cynomys ludovicianus (vertical lines) and Tamias striatus (horizontal lines), and the locations of Schulze Cave and Friesenhahn Cave (filled circles), where both occur in Pleistocene faunas. Scale in miles.

Figure 5. Map showing the modern distributions of Mustela erminea (horizontal lines) and Reithrodontomys fulvescens (vertical lines), and the location of Schulze Cave (filled circle), where both occur in a Pleistocene fauna. Scale in miles.

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/geo/balcones_escarpment/pages41-50.html?p=print

I'd start an OOParts thread, but I've got too many going as it is.  :-\
http://www.genesispark.com/exhibits/evidence/historical/ancient/dinosaur/
http://www.genesispark.com/exhibits/evidence/paleontological/footprints/

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2016, 07:44:16 AM »
The most minerologically rich deposit of Rare Earths in the United States is now submerged under a lake.

http://www.energyandcapital.com/articles/the-legend-of-barringer-hill/5217

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2016, 10:06:32 AM »


Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #10 on: March 24, 2016, 11:01:25 AM »
Mohs Hardness Scale: http://www.jewelinfo4u.com/how-gemstone-hardness-measured

Full Gemstone Chart: http://www.etoolsage.com/Chart/Gemstone_Hardness_Chart.asp  Chinese site.

Gem rough Identification: http://www.etoolsage.com/Chart/Gemstone_Chart.asp             Chinese site.

http://www.gemselect.com/gem-info/gem-hardness-info.php

http://www.gemselect.com/other-info/other-info.php                                                           miscellaneous gemstone information.

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #11 on: March 24, 2016, 11:15:19 AM »
Best price on Hardness test kit (picks & plates.)   http://geology.com/store/collections/hardness-kit.shtml

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #12 on: March 24, 2016, 07:01:50 PM »
What an awesome thread, Sandman! ;D  Thank you. :-*

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #13 on: March 24, 2016, 07:16:55 PM »
More in Texas:
Fossilized human dinosaur tracks. http://theelusiveguanaco.blogspot.com/2012/10/did-humans-walk-with-dinosaurs-look-at.html

         

Figure1. Map showing locations of dinosaur tracks in the Glen Rose Formation of Central Texas (Modified from Langston, 1974). Scale in miles.

Figure 2. Map showing the locations of Quaternary localities mentioned in the text. 1) Kyle site, Hill Country; 2) Laubach Cave, Williamson County; 3) Fyllan Cave, Travis County; 4) Mac's Cave, Travis County, 5) Barton Road site, Travis County; 6) Levi Shelter, Travis County; 7) Longhorn Cavern, Burnet County; 8) Miller's Cave, Llano County; 9) Wunderlich site, Comal County; 10) Friesenhahn Cave, Bexar County; 11) Cave Without a Name, Kendall County; 12) Kincaid Shelter, Uvalde County; 13) Rattlesnake Cave, Kinney County; 14) Felton Cave, Sutton County; 15) Centipede Cave, Val Verde County; 16) Damp Cave, Val Verde County; 17) Cueva Quebrada, Val Verde County; 18) Bonfire Cave, Val Verde County. Scale in miles.

Figure 3. Map showing modern distributions of Synaptomys cooperi (vertical lines) and late Pleistocene occurrences in Texas and Mexico. Scale in miles.

Figure 4. Map showing modern distributions of Cynomys ludovicianus (vertical lines) and Tamias striatus (horizontal lines), and the locations of Schulze Cave and Friesenhahn Cave (filled circles), where both occur in Pleistocene faunas. Scale in miles.

Figure 5. Map showing the modern distributions of Mustela erminea (horizontal lines) and Reithrodontomys fulvescens (vertical lines), and the location of Schulze Cave (filled circle), where both occur in a Pleistocene fauna. Scale in miles.

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/geo/balcones_escarpment/pages41-50.html?p=print

I'd start an OOParts thread, but I've got too many going as it is.  :-\
http://www.genesispark.com/exhibits/evidence/historical/ancient/dinosaur/
http://www.genesispark.com/exhibits/evidence/paleontological/footprints/
Nice I find fossils all the time hiking or fishing at the creeks- though generally nothing "good" but mollusks etc- no dinosaurs, fish, or people. But this find "Leander Lady," was sorta, near me:
http://www.williamson-county-historical-commission.org/Leander/Leander_Texas_Williamson_County.html
I was hoping after our big summer floods that I would find some neat stuff but, so far, nothing. Btw, in response to another thread, have you heard the Solutrean hypothesis Hypothesis that links Clovis Culture to the Solutreans in Europe? Very controversial. But there have been odd "finds" that often disappear due to the new laws on "Indians" but the Clovis points etc can still be seen in museums or found.

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #14 on: March 24, 2016, 07:34:13 PM »
Nice I find fossils all the time hiking or fishing at the creeks- though generally nothing "good" but mollusks etc- no dinosaurs, fish, or people. But this find "Leander Lady," was sorta, near me:
http://www.williamson-county-historical-commission.org/Leander/Leander_Texas_Williamson_County.html
I was hoping after our big summer floods that I would find some neat stuff but, so far, nothing. Btw, in response to another thread, have you heard the Solutrean hypothesis Hypothesis that links Clovis Culture to the Solutreans in Europe? Very controversial. But there have been odd "finds" that often disappear due to the new laws on "Indians" but the Clovis points etc can still be seen in museums or found.

I was fascinated by the Solutrean thing, too, for a while, but it's been contradicted since the only skeleton found with Clovis stuff is genetically Asian.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anzick-1

Now boat migration down the west coast earlier than the ice-free corridor is still on the table, though, and that's almost as interesting.

Clovis points are beautiful, though:




Despite the testimony of lots of expert flintknappers, it does look like there really are only so many ways to make a pointy rock.

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #15 on: March 24, 2016, 08:35:27 PM »
always liked this


Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2016, 09:50:39 PM »
I was fascinated by the Solutrean thing, too, for a while, but it's been contradicted since the only skeleton found with Clovis stuff is genetically Asian.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anzick-1

Now boat migration down the west coast earlier than the ice-free corridor is still on the table, though, and that's almost as interesting.

Clovis points are beautiful, though:




Despite the testimony of lots of expert flintknappers, it does look like there really are only so many ways to make a pointy rock.
Interesting, while I can understand the sentiment I think some of the laws are working as a detriment to science (and even preservation) I know one guy down here who claims to know about Indian burial grounds/mounds and places to find arrow heads etc but won't tell people (though I hear he will 'sell' through various channels) because the laws. So instead of anthropology, history, or science (or the native people) being furthered it goes into private hands, sites are dug at my amateurs, etc. Same with some environmental stuff, again another guy who tells me, he just uses the skidsteer to fill-in caves etc if he finds them because risk of laws and then shutdown of construction. In some places people even purposely poach to ensure no "protected" species will be found in some government audit/study that could cause problems. Horrible because that could be important bat areas, archeological finds, aquifer recharge points but the potential costs of 'discovery' of an animal, site, grave, etc is so costly now that people will do such. I guess the problem is nothing new but still frustrating because the current laws seem to cause more damage than some middle-ground that would protect private property rights but preserve important things.

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #17 on: March 26, 2016, 05:44:41 AM »
Opal - The Queen of Gems.

   

http://geology.com/gemstones/opal/

http://www.gemstone.org/index.php?catid=1:gem-by-gem&id=99:-opal&Itemid=69&option=com_content&view=article

http://www.opalsociety.org/opal_express.htm

If you have opals and store them in a safety deposit box, make sure they are in a container submerged in water. If you don't, and you let them in there a long time, when you go to remove them, they will be crazed (cracked.) Keep 'em moist or lose your investment. :o  ;)

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #18 on: March 26, 2016, 05:48:05 AM »
Opal - The Queen of Gems.

   

http://geology.com/gemstones/opal/

http://www.gemstone.org/index.php?catid=1:gem-by-gem&id=99:-opal&Itemid=69&option=com_content&view=article

http://www.opalsociety.org/opal_express.htm

If you have opals and store them in a safety deposit box, make sure they are in a container submerged in water. If you don't, and you let them in there a long time, when you go to remove them, they will be crazed (cracked.) Keep 'em moist or lose your investment. :o  ;)
opals are fairly inexpensive if I remember correctly

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #19 on: March 26, 2016, 06:08:22 AM »
I love fire Opal, but Labradorite is very cool as well.

Thanks for the links. I need to get some more grit for my tumbler. Have a bunch of Moss agate that needs polishing.

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2016, 10:11:50 AM »
I've always been partial to the now-almost-common moonstone.  There was a brief fashion for setting it in horn or tortoiseshell about a hundred years ago, which worked really well:





Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #22 on: March 26, 2016, 05:32:01 PM »

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #23 on: March 26, 2016, 08:05:03 PM »


Wow, trostol.  What's the story behind this rock?  Beautiful...like a mineral aquarium.

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #24 on: March 27, 2016, 12:01:26 AM »
Wow, trostol.  What's the story behind this rock?  Beautiful...like a mineral aquarium.

ya know what..i am not sure.. i can not find much else about save this...so i am a touch..skeptical lol

http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/very-fine-american-contra-luz-opal-nebula

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #25 on: March 27, 2016, 12:23:11 AM »
Great thread. I collect rocks too, but especially meteorites. This is what iron and nickel looks like when it crystalizes in space in the core of an asteroid.


Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #26 on: March 27, 2016, 12:35:14 AM »
More in Texas:
Fossilized human dinosaur tracks. http://theelusiveguanaco.blogspot.com/2012/10/did-humans-walk-with-dinosaurs-look-at.html

         

Figure1. Map showing locations of dinosaur tracks in the Glen Rose Formation of Central Texas (Modified from Langston, 1974). Scale in miles.

Figure 2. Map showing the locations of Quaternary localities mentioned in the text. 1) Kyle site, Hill Country; 2) Laubach Cave, Williamson County; 3) Fyllan Cave, Travis County; 4) Mac's Cave, Travis County, 5) Barton Road site, Travis County; 6) Levi Shelter, Travis County; 7) Longhorn Cavern, Burnet County; 8) Miller's Cave, Llano County; 9) Wunderlich site, Comal County; 10) Friesenhahn Cave, Bexar County; 11) Cave Without a Name, Kendall County; 12) Kincaid Shelter, Uvalde County; 13) Rattlesnake Cave, Kinney County; 14) Felton Cave, Sutton County; 15) Centipede Cave, Val Verde County; 16) Damp Cave, Val Verde County; 17) Cueva Quebrada, Val Verde County; 18) Bonfire Cave, Val Verde County. Scale in miles.

Figure 3. Map showing modern distributions of Synaptomys cooperi (vertical lines) and late Pleistocene occurrences in Texas and Mexico. Scale in miles.

Figure 4. Map showing modern distributions of Cynomys ludovicianus (vertical lines) and Tamias striatus (horizontal lines), and the locations of Schulze Cave and Friesenhahn Cave (filled circles), where both occur in Pleistocene faunas. Scale in miles.

Figure 5. Map showing the modern distributions of Mustela erminea (horizontal lines) and Reithrodontomys fulvescens (vertical lines), and the location of Schulze Cave (filled circle), where both occur in a Pleistocene fauna. Scale in miles.

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/geo/balcones_escarpment/pages41-50.html?p=print

I'd start an OOParts thread, but I've got too many going as it is.  :-\
http://www.genesispark.com/exhibits/evidence/historical/ancient/dinosaur/
http://www.genesispark.com/exhibits/evidence/paleontological/footprints/

I totally do not believe humans & dinosaurs walked the earth together. Don't ask me why got decided to throw a rock at them.

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #27 on: March 27, 2016, 12:38:19 AM »
opals are fairly inexpensive if I remember correctly

Mom has an opal necklace grandad got for grandmom when he was in Burma during the war.

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #28 on: March 27, 2016, 05:29:21 PM »
Great thread. I collect rocks too, but especially meteorites. This is what iron and nickel looks like when it crystalizes in space in the core of an asteroid.


Are you sure that it isn't some advanced circuit-board from a crashed UFO?   ;) Actually if you stare at it a few moments you almost get a 3-D effect like those lines are a schematic of a giant gasworks, chemical plant, or scaffolding system.

Re: Gemology, Minerology, and Lapidary
« Reply #29 on: March 27, 2016, 07:05:46 PM »
Are you sure that it isn't some advanced circuit-board from a crashed UFO?   ;) Actually if you stare at it a few moments you almost get a 3-D effect like those lines are a schematic of a giant gasworks, chemical plant, or scaffolding system.

Haha.  Somebody contact Hoagland.  I see an overhead shot of New York City, circa 1926.