Author Amy On The Radio  (Read 204389 times)

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Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #30 on: April 23, 2016, 12:30:42 AM »
Have Hoagland as a guest. He owes you since you were a guest on his show. And when he's a guest ask him for dirt on DMDN. Ask him if he ever cussed out Keith! 

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #31 on: April 23, 2016, 03:23:00 AM »
Have Hoagland as a guest. He owes you since you were a guest on his show. And when he's a guest ask him for dirt on DMDN. Ask him if he ever cussed out Keith!

He wouldn't want me to interview him. I'm a cordial interviewee but remember that part where I questioned torsion fields? It would prob be that for 3 hours straight. Nobody really wants to hear that.

Like I said in another thread, not talking about other shows on my show. No gossip to reveal. Everything you know, I know. Your guess is as good as mine.

Just to clear the air, because I'm sure people are still going to call into my show and ask...

It's really not as exciting behind scenes as it's made out to seem on social media and on-air. I promise.

Here's the boring inside insight into the inner workings of DMDN: Prepare to be shocked and amazed :o

Keith runs a business. We all know that, he knows that, he's not going to sugar coat anything. Keith is Keith. People DO however, expect a lot of him. He works his ass off just like anybody else does. That being said, he can be an extremely easy guy to work with most days, contrary to popular belief and the way he comes off on the radio or social media at times. It's pretty much that is that. We weren't BFF's but we got along bc my work ethic is solid and I was always focused on justifying my own cost through metrics. In other words, I logged and made track of almost every call and minute I put into the show, because I wanted to (not because he demanded it)-- and most days, my reporting on it in length became more of an annoyance than anything.

What mattered at the end of the day was writing and producing 9 mins of news then just reporting new affiliates when they went online. My part on the show was really small potatoes.

When Art Bell calls your phone

Calls with Art were spontaneous and usually short (sometimes lasting less than a minute), just wanting to know a quick status update or affiliate details. We would occasionally talk about relevant news to the program. Guests and callers generally will get a longer conversation with Art because when he's busy, he doesn't have time for bullshit and fluff.
In the words of a famous poet, "Aint nobody got time for that." Art never poured his heart out to me, told me about his Ouija experience, or shared the details of the late Bugs' bigfoot stash. One can only speculate.

 Still, working for Art made the experience no less surreal or nerve wracking seeing "Art Bell" on the caller ID. I'd always see it and immediately say aloud, "Oh shit, it's Art calling. Gotta stop everything and answer." There was an unspoken policy that if any of us had a call from Art while we were on the phone with each other, we'd almost always immediately hang up and take the call. I can think of maybe two instances that I didn't do that, both involving being on the line with major affiliates.

Leaving the network

When the show shifted, cost demanded my departure. Affiliates were in limbo. News wasn't worth that whole cost, and I'd rather have been freed up to do my own thing on my own time. It was logical and as simple as that with no hard feelings or emotions. I said, "Welp, that sucks," and moved on. They took a chance on me. Thankful to have had that experience. When my job was done it was done.

I was more concerned for Art and Heather than my own ass taking up space before I left. Again, there's nothing left to that story that hasn't already been relayed by Art or Heather themselves. Keith allowed me to finish out December at my own request, which was nice of him. He didn't have to do that. I wanted to support Heather during the transition. I still think about them a lot but haven't spoken to any of them personally in ages. I enjoyed working with the whole team, while it lasted. As always, I wish them all the best. Even RCH.

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #32 on: April 23, 2016, 05:04:55 AM »
Good luck Amy.
I enjoyed you before . You have a good voice.
Nice PC!


Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #33 on: April 23, 2016, 10:42:48 AM »
I truly wish you luck Amy and it's cool you're back on BellGab. Don't let the inevitable negative comments that may get posted online get to you.

What you describe about MITD is more or less what I gathered it was like. Interesting to get your perspective though.

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #34 on: April 23, 2016, 10:50:48 AM »
I think "I wish them all the best" is radio code for "fuck these dicks for firing me, but I want to look magnanimous because I don't want to get a reputation in the industry as a whiny troublemaker". I have lost count of the number of times I have heard people in radio say "I wish them all the best" in response to getting fired.

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #35 on: April 23, 2016, 10:57:46 AM »
I think "I wish them all the best" is radio code for "fuck these dicks for firing me, but I want to look magnanimous because I don't want to get a reputation in the industry as a whiny troublemaker". I have lost count of the number of times I have heard people in radio say "I wish them all the best" in response to getting fired.

Magna.. how many? It isn't just radio...the fixed smile on the faces of the losing nominees at awards ceremonies is just as transparent.

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #36 on: April 23, 2016, 11:38:31 AM »
Magna.. how many? It isn't just radio...the fixed smile on the faces of the losing nominees at awards ceremonies is just as transparent.

 Why does that actually matter?  Listen to the fucking show and if it's good keep listening to it.

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #37 on: April 23, 2016, 11:50:04 AM »
Why does that actually matter?  Listen to the fucking show and if it's good keep listening to it.


Yes dad. Sorry dad. :-X

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #38 on: April 23, 2016, 06:17:14 PM »
Good luck Amy.
I enjoyed you before . You have a good voice.
Nice PC!

Muchos gracias!

I truly wish you luck Amy and it's cool you're back on BellGab. Don't let the inevitable negative comments that may get posted online get to you.

What you describe about MITD is more or less what I gathered it was like. Interesting to get your perspective though.

Oh no, I don't.

Thanks.
I think "I wish them all the best" is radio code for "fuck these dicks for firing me, but I want to look magnanimous because I don't want to get a reputation in the industry as a whiny troublemaker". I have lost count of the number of times I have heard people in radio say "I wish them all the best" in response to getting fired.

Haha, no it's not like that at all. I really, genuinely wish them all of my best. Especially Heather.

 Whatever anyone wants to say about Heather---whatever criticisms or critiques or downright unfounded ugliness spewing hatred at wholesale, she's the absolute most dedicated person I've EVER known, to her role. When I'd take weekends, she didn't. She was a producer 24/7 and now, not only is she doing the show too, she's gonna do five hours of it. She just rolls that way. I totally admire her for that, and hope I can at least be half of that in trying to produce and do my own show.

That being said, I could not do a five hour show. Long ago I would have said, "yeah let's do this," but for me now, it's crazytalk. My ass doesn't want to sit in an office chair that long anymore. Like Art, I've got back problems. Two years ago, I flipped my car coming back from a 10,000+ mile road trip. Was run off the road 2 hours from home. I broke my neck and totaled my car. That sucked. I have a family to think about too and also, school. Point is, I just couldn't do it.

Say what you will, but from my gross observation, Heather is superhuman. She has always lived and breathed Midnight. She is in many ways a hero to me. She had all of two hours to prepare for the role she's in now before being plunged into the seat of host. I just couldn't do that. It's been four months on and I'm STILL prepping to do that on my own terms. She's done a damn fine job giving these extreme circumstances, if you ask me. Not saying that just to be professional or cordial. She's truly one hell of a lady.

As I said before though, me leaving the show from a cost perspective was only logical. The minute I joined the team, my goal was to only stick around as long as I was useful to the cause. Compensation was a bonus. I'd already done a month of work on news (wrote 80+ articles, played editor to the 3rd party DMN site, and was already helping with creating a database of affiliate contacts)-- all 3rd party work for no pay.

Art was more than generous. My only concern was doing whatever I could do to help everyone and make Art's life easier. I didn't do it for myself; I did it for Art. When I didn't think he'd seriously even consider putting me on-air, he did. The thought of doing news initially made no sense at all to me when he could have picked someone else more qualified to do it. I was prepared to just turn over the database of affiliates I had been helping with and say, "Good luck. I'm rootin' for ya," but Art wanted news, so I made it happen. If it weren't for Heather I probably wouldn't have had that opportunity; she didn't know me from Adam, but as I understand, she was the one who made the case to Art.

Cold Boring Facts About Cost of Doing Business
Prior to my role in MITD, I had an extensive background in managing cost centers for a fairly sizable tech corp. This part will probably bore the hell out of everyone. My job then was to justify cost of tech support through measuring and enforcing metrics like audits, policy, engineering, optimal fixes for a product line, and tech behaviors.

At the end of the day I made the shitty decisions like whether or not a line of business on the tech side or a product was feasible (defining product End of Life or EOL), as every call and service dispatch was a non-revenue generating expense. There's a lot of math and data that goes into it, but MITD was a LOT smaller scale so I only had my own metrics to choose to develop and account for. Most people know the basic formula for financial accounting in business: Revenue (R) minus Expenses (E)=Profit (P).

My Role as an Expense
If you want to look at it this way, the "news" product was a total cost center or expense (E), and comprised 50% of my role (attributing to the total the cost of goods sold, which Keith only knows). The other 50% of my role was terrestrial affiliate sales (the term 'sales' being a total misnomer). This is where it gets complicated.

With affiliates, you have two types of ads that are aired: (N) for Network and (L) for local inventory. For the most part, this was also split 50/50 between MITD and the affiliates. Affiliate coordination ('sales') only generated revenue POTENTIAL, as long as network (N) ad inventory was being aired. Sometimes larger markets didn't even air our ads, but it increased potential when marketing the show to other stations to say, "we have thus and such big station which just signed on." Again, only attributing to X.

 While I don't know the entire ins and outs of the advertising side, I do know that being able to say, "we're on this many stations in these major markets" did have a large impact. In other words, it was all dependent on ad sales, so I didn't personally generate revenue. Just revenue potential (X). Defining and leveraging the rest of X was my job, through an even more complicated matrix of variables, which if I wanted to, could spit out reports to show where X's opportunities lie. This defined my personal metrics. Not going to get into all of that here.

So there you have it.

This largely made my job 100% a non-revenue cost center to the organization (with return on investment being a very marginal outlier at the end of the day after changes in the business). I knew that it would be a total cost center going into the role, so I did everything I could to leverage revenue potential and help the organization from my limited standpoint. I even made Keith invest in software to help me with this, because the marginal expense was worth it at the time.

Personal Cost-Benefit Analysis
On the other side of that, there was my own cost-benefit analysis of time invested doing news versus impact for ad sales and subscribers. Most affiliates didn't carry my news in the markets that would have mattered. News in that sense mostly complimented internet streaming for the network.

Doing the news took away roughly six hours of my day from research/fact checking to writing about 2,500 words of copy, to organizing everything down into packaged three minute segments, to doing the read, to what you heard on the radio.
Compared to the rest of the show, it wasn't that important. It was one more thing to have to manage, and by that point, I was already personally exhausted.

 Keith left it open-ended for me (like the remote possibility of adding back news in the future) but at that point there was so much ambiguity that I just pretty much said, "It's cool. I think I'll do my own thing and not be a burden."

I saw it this way: The products I supported had a useful life that had expired. Again. No drama. No hard feelings. No F-U's.
Just. Pure. logic.

As an aside, I got the Keith stamp of approval on Twitter when I first announced that I was going to do my own show awhile back--- and that's saying a lot. He told me I was perfectly capable. That too, meant a lot to me. I never asked to be on DMDN because at that time, he was cutting other live shows. Again--- I absolutely did not want to be a burden. He's got enough on his plate. That's why I'm on DTRN.

I'm absolutely not being disingenuous when I say, "I wish them all the best."  I really do.

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #39 on: April 23, 2016, 06:27:47 PM »
Very Classy post Amy

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #40 on: April 23, 2016, 06:38:11 PM »
Amy: I too was dedicated to a particular craft. (High school football) Staying late, lifting weights, watching tape, knowing defense in and out. My point is no matter how dedicated I was, I didn't have the "talent" to play at the college level. So, as disappointed as I was, I moved on to something I could do at the college level--Slaying poon.

Be well. :)

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #41 on: April 23, 2016, 06:40:35 PM »
Amy: I too was dedicated to a particular craft. (High school football) Staying late, lifting weights, watching tape, knowing defense in and out. My point is no matter how dedicated I was, I didn't have the "talent" to play at the college level. So, as disappointed as that was I moved on to something I could do at the college level--Slaying poon.

Be well. :)

Excellent post. And your poon slaying abilities are legendary, sir.

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #42 on: April 23, 2016, 06:46:52 PM »
She does have a great personality and perspective. Hope she goes far.

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #43 on: April 23, 2016, 06:49:09 PM »
Excellent post. And your poon slaying abilities are legendary, sir.

Thank yeeewww!

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #44 on: April 23, 2016, 06:51:21 PM »
Amy: I too was dedicated to a particular craft. (High school football) Staying late, lifting weights, watching tape, knowing defense in and out. My point is no matter how dedicated I was, I didn't have the "talent" to play at the college level. So, as disappointed as I was, I moved on to something I could do at the college level--Slaying poon.

Be well. :)
So if a Big Ten or SEC school had offered you a fill ride scholarship and a starting position as a Freshman, you would have said no?

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #45 on: April 23, 2016, 07:28:41 PM »
(There's my synth crap in there too. Pardon the mess.)

Can you play some Lazerhawk in your bumpers?

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #46 on: April 23, 2016, 07:32:07 PM »
Muchos gracias!

Oh no, I don't.

Thanks.
Haha, no it's not like that at all. I really, genuinely wish them all of my best. Especially Heather.

 Whatever anyone wants to say about Heather---whatever criticisms or critiques or downright unfounded ugliness spewing hatred at wholesale, she's the absolute most dedicated person I've EVER known, to her role. When I'd take weekends, she didn't. She was a producer 24/7 and now, not only is she doing the show too, she's gonna do five hours of it. She just rolls that way. I totally admire her for that, and hope I can at least be half of that in trying to produce and do my own show.

That being said, I could not do a five hour show. Long ago I would have said, "yeah let's do this," but for me now, it's crazytalk. My ass doesn't want to sit in an office chair that long anymore. Like Art, I've got back problems. Two years ago, I flipped my car coming back from a 10,000+ mile road trip. Was run off the road 2 hours from home. I broke my neck and totaled my car. That sucked. I have a family to think about too and also, school. Point is, I just couldn't do it.

Say what you will, but from my gross observation, Heather is superhuman. She has always lived and breathed Midnight. She is in many ways a hero to me. She had all of two hours to prepare for the role she's in now before being plunged into the seat of host. I just couldn't do that. It's been four months on and I'm STILL prepping to do that on my own terms. She's done a damn fine job giving these extreme circumstances, if you ask me. Not saying that just to be professional or cordial. She's truly one hell of a lady.

As I said before though, me leaving the show from a cost perspective was only logical. The minute I joined the team, my goal was to only stick around as long as I was useful to the cause. Compensation was a bonus. I'd already done a month of work on news (wrote 80+ articles, played editor to the 3rd party DMN site, and was already helping with creating a database of affiliate contacts)-- all 3rd party work for no pay.

Art was more than generous. My only concern was doing whatever I could do to help everyone and make Art's life easier. I didn't do it for myself; I did it for Art. When I didn't think he'd seriously even consider putting me on-air, he did. The thought of doing news initially made no sense at all to me when he could have picked someone else more qualified to do it. I was prepared to just turn over the database of affiliates I had been helping with and say, "Good luck. I'm rootin' for ya," but Art wanted news, so I made it happen. If it weren't for Heather I probably wouldn't have had that opportunity; she didn't know me from Adam, but as I understand, she was the one who made the case to Art.

Cold Boring Facts About Cost of Doing Business
Prior to my role in MITD, I had an extensive background in managing cost centers for a fairly sizable tech corp. This part will probably bore the hell out of everyone. My job then was to justify cost of tech support through measuring and enforcing metrics like audits, policy, engineering, optimal fixes for a product line, and tech behaviors.

At the end of the day I made the shitty decisions like whether or not a line of business on the tech side or a product was feasible (defining product End of Life or EOL), as every call and service dispatch was a non-revenue generating expense. There's a lot of math and data that goes into it, but MITD was a LOT smaller scale so I only had my own metrics to choose to develop and account for. Most people know the basic formula for financial accounting in business: Revenue (R) minus Expenses (E)=Profit (P).

My Role as an Expense
If you want to look at it this way, the "news" product was a total cost center or expense (E), and comprised 50% of my role (attributing to the total the cost of goods sold, which Keith only knows). The other 50% of my role was terrestrial affiliate sales (the term 'sales' being a total misnomer). This is where it gets complicated.

With affiliates, you have two types of ads that are aired: (N) for Network and (L) for local inventory. For the most part, this was also split 50/50 between MITD and the affiliates. Affiliate coordination ('sales') only generated revenue POTENTIAL, as long as network (N) ad inventory was being aired. Sometimes larger markets didn't even air our ads, but it increased potential when marketing the show to other stations to say, "we have thus and such big station which just signed on." Again, only attributing to X.

 While I don't know the entire ins and outs of the advertising side, I do know that being able to say, "we're on this many stations in these major markets" did have a large impact. In other words, it was all dependent on ad sales, so I didn't personally generate revenue. Just revenue potential (X). Defining and leveraging the rest of X was my job, through an even more complicated matrix of variables, which if I wanted to, could spit out reports to show where X's opportunities lie. This defined my personal metrics. Not going to get into all of that here.

So there you have it.

This largely made my job 100% a non-revenue cost center to the organization (with return on investment being a very marginal outlier at the end of the day after changes in the business). I knew that it would be a total cost center going into the role, so I did everything I could to leverage revenue potential and help the organization from my limited standpoint. I even made Keith invest in software to help me with this, because the marginal expense was worth it at the time.

Personal Cost-Benefit Analysis
On the other side of that, there was my own cost-benefit analysis of time invested doing news versus impact for ad sales and subscribers. Most affiliates didn't carry my news in the markets that would have mattered. News in that sense mostly complimented internet streaming for the network.

Doing the news took away roughly six hours of my day from research/fact checking to writing about 2,500 words of copy, to organizing everything down into packaged three minute segments, to doing the read, to what you heard on the radio.
Compared to the rest of the show, it wasn't that important. It was one more thing to have to manage, and by that point, I was already personally exhausted.

 Keith left it open-ended for me (like the remote possibility of adding back news in the future) but at that point there was so much ambiguity that I just pretty much said, "It's cool. I think I'll do my own thing and not be a burden."

I saw it this way: The products I supported had a useful life that had expired. Again. No drama. No hard feelings. No F-U's.
Just. Pure. logic.

As an aside, I got the Keith stamp of approval on Twitter when I first announced that I was going to do my own show awhile back--- and that's saying a lot. He told me I was perfectly capable. That too, meant a lot to me. I never asked to be on DMDN because at that time, he was cutting other live shows. Again--- I absolutely did not want to be a burden. He's got enough on his plate. That's why I'm on DTRN.

I'm absolutely not being disingenuous when I say, "I wish them all the best."  I really do.


Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #47 on: April 23, 2016, 07:42:00 PM »
Can you play some Lazerhawk in your bumpers?

I'll have to ask. Would be killer.

DWTD agreed to let me play them in bumpers in exchange for a 60 second ad spot on my show.
The ad was my idea since they're independent and I'm not paying for the major music licensing.



Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #48 on: April 23, 2016, 07:43:39 PM »
I'll have to ask. Would be killer.

DWTD agreed to let me play them in bumpers in exchange for a 60 second ad spot on my show.
The ad was my idea since they're independent and I'm not paying for the major music licensing.

Nice. Saw DWTD last night in LA.

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #49 on: April 23, 2016, 07:45:38 PM »
Nice. Saw DWTD last night in LA.

I saw that posted to their Twitter. Wish I could have been there!

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #50 on: April 23, 2016, 08:05:57 PM »
So if a Big Ten or SEC school had offered you a fill ride scholarship and a starting position as a Freshman, you would have said no?

Just to continue your analogy, I don't think anyone would fault him for taking the position and giving it his best shot.  But the minute he turned on the fans, or acted anything less than blissfully grateful to be there, he'd be toast.

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #51 on: April 23, 2016, 08:15:49 PM »
Thanks for your response Amy.
I can appreciate a strong work ethic from anyone in any field.
You are a good person and anyone should count themselves lucky to have you as a friend.

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #52 on: April 23, 2016, 08:16:32 PM »
So if a Big Ten or SEC school had offered you a fill ride scholarship and a starting position as a Freshman, you would have said no?

HAHAHA! Throw in Scam Newton money. Maybe.

I doubt Alabama would want a 6' 179 pound kid starting at linebacker. Plus it would  stick out like a sore thumb on the field! That's when criticism would be to hard to rebuke with, "he's getting better every week"! And tell the fans/booster's I would be filling in for last years 'ALL-SEC' linebacker, cuz reasons.



Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #53 on: April 23, 2016, 08:18:28 PM »
Just to continue your analogy, I don't think anyone would fault him for taking the position and giving it his best shot.  But the minute he turned on the fans, or acted anything less than blissfully grateful to be there, he'd be toast.

If you suck, you suck.

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #54 on: April 23, 2016, 09:33:42 PM »
The ad was my idea since they're independent and I'm not paying for the major music licensing.

That's cool. I was going to ask what bumper music you were going to use.

It sounds like you're pretty sharp and have some experience in another industry in tech to fall back on if this venture goes south, which is smart. Might as well give this a try if it's your passion.

Have you been the on-air talent for any radio stations or podcasts prior to MITD though? Just curious. A lot has been said about Heather's lack of time behind the mic before taking over MITD. I'm sure there's a learning curve to being a host and some native talent needed, but I can't speak from personal experience.

Are you nervous? Is there any kind of training or anything you're looking at to help with it or do you have some already?  Or are you kind of doing the baptism-by-fire route?

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #55 on: April 23, 2016, 09:55:08 PM »
So if a Big Ten or SEC school had offered you a fill ride scholarship and a starting position as a Freshman, you would have said no?

say he said "yes"...and team moral is down because better players were passed over for him and games start to suffer do to him not having the natural aptitude or skill to be playing in that position

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #56 on: April 23, 2016, 10:17:19 PM »
Want to try to get Joel, Frank, or the Rifftrax crowd on sometime. Frank's dad was JFK's adviser. He'd probably have some awesome stories.
This is a superb idea. Hope it happens.

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #57 on: April 24, 2016, 12:13:07 AM »
</bellgab> Good on the transparency, technology, professionalism and social media fronts so far. Great choice of <pompomwave> first guest </pompomwave>.<bellgab>

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #58 on: April 24, 2016, 01:27:46 AM »

.... Whatever anyone wants to say about Heather---whatever criticisms or critiques or downright unfounded ugliness spewing hatred at wholesale, she's the absolute most dedicated person I've EVER known, to her role. When I'd take weekends, she didn't. She was a producer 24/7 and now, not only is she doing the show too, she's gonna do five hours of it. She just rolls that way. I totally admire her for that, and hope I can at least be half of that in trying to produce and do my own show......

.....Say what you will, but from my gross observation, Heather is superhuman. She has always lived and breathed Midnight. She is in many ways a hero to me. She had all of two hours to prepare for the role she's in now before being plunged into the seat of host. I just couldn't do that. It's been four months on and I'm STILL prepping to do that on my own terms. She's done a damn fine job giving these extreme circumstances, if you ask me. Not saying that just to be professional or cordial. She's truly one hell of a lady.....

This is my take as well.

Just from what small interaction I had with her when she used to do segments for my podcast, she brought her A game every time.  She's got a great voice and talent for radio.  She really gives it her all, and it shows.  The people that throw so much hate at her are only doing it because A) they're jealous and/or B) she's not Art.  Neither of which she can do anything about.

Good luck with your show, Amy, I'll check it out.

Re: Amy On The Radio
« Reply #59 on: April 24, 2016, 01:31:37 AM »
That's cool. I was going to ask what bumper music you were going to use.

It sounds like you're pretty sharp and have some experience in another industry in tech to fall back on if this venture goes south, which is smart. Might as well give this a try if it's your passion.

Have you been the on-air talent for any radio stations or podcasts prior to MITD though? Just curious. A lot has been said about Heather's lack of time behind the mic before taking over MITD. I'm sure there's a learning curve to being a host and some native talent needed, but I can't speak from personal experience.

Are you nervous? Is there any kind of training or anything you're looking at to help with it or do you have some already?  Or are you kind of doing the baptism-by-fire route?

Thanks.

I started out doing web development when I was 14, and from there, found myself in the middle of the music industry doing promotions, booking, management, working in studios doing audio engineering, etc. Had my first brief introduction to radio around that time too.

Before I started doing news, I had my own studio in my house for recording music.

Last year, I decided to do the Haunted Skeptic Podcast. Its three episodes can be found here:
http://hauntedskeptic.com/podcast

After that, I did the Asimov show with RCH.

I'd already done voiceover work in the past.

With some training and a lot of practice, I developed better voice techniques. I upgraded my equipment.
Doing the news was more baptism-by-fire than anything.

Aside from that, I've done a lot of press interviews and public speaking. I learn and write like hell all of the time.

CS and IT are just trades. Those trades funded my college education for awhile when I thought I was going the business route. That turned into economic development, which turned into a job at a lucrative tech company. I met a lot of inspirational people in aerospace through volunteering in the community as I represented that tech company for STEM outreach. They set me on course to biomed engineering, and now allied neuro. I already had a gross lifelong interest in neuromedicine, since I had a crash course as a kid when my Dad was diagnosed with a pituitary tumor (he's okay now).

My research focal areas are cognitive and cellular neuroscience in regenerative health. They sound like two totally different areas, but for me they're not. My goal is to develop better diagnostics in measuring and mapping glial cellular structures (mapping being the holy grail for me that'll support research in glial precursors to neural network functions). Cog neuro allows me to explore those areas through functional models with neural anomalies resulting from TBI (like stroke) and psych disorders. It's currently the best way to study and measure glial cellular functions (and a lot less boring than postmortem sample studies). Endgoal is eliminating need for extraneous pharmacological therapies w/ people who are drug dependent like my father, to stay alive.

I'm doing radio absolutely for fun. It gives me a break from all of the serious stuff I do on a regular basis. My other option is attempting to dethrone Laidlaw's Galaga world record. Smug bastard. I've got a qualifying cabinet now. Someday, it'll happen.

That said, I don't take myself too seriously.
Not nervous at all.

This is a superb idea. Hope it happens.

I hope so too. Hopefully after the Manos show, the Master will approve!