Author US Navy Japanese container ship collision  (Read 1685 times)

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Re: US Navy Japanese container ship collision
« Reply #60 on: July 14, 2017, 04:38:11 PM »
Sounds similar to situations you get between aircraft but at a much slower speed. Isn't there some kind of automated system in shipping where ships automatically communicate with each other and alert the crews to danger if there's a collision risk?
Sort of like this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traffic_collision_avoidance_system

It's been a while since I stood a bridge watch but I am not aware of any automatic warning system on Navy ships.  There is an ample number of personnel on watch at all times while a U.S. Navy ship is underway.  Typically on the bridge there would an officer of the deck (OOD) an assistant OOD, one or more OOD's under instruction, the quartermaster of the watch (Navigator) and two or more helmsmen.  Also on watch  there would be a Combat Information Center (CÍC) team consisting of a CIC Watch Officer and 2 or more radar operators who would be instructed to report to the bridge and track any contacts within a certain distance, typically 5 Nautical miles but that would vary according to operating conditions.  There are also port and starboard and an aft lookouts.  There are several radar repeaters on the bridge and one in the captain's sea cabin.  As you can see there are a lot of "eyes on" while the ship is steaming and an automatic warning system has no doubt been considered unnecessary heretofore.  That may change with this incident but I think it will be found that an unfortunate series of errors on the part of personnel on both of the ships occurred 

Merchant ship's are much more sparsely manned and underway watches may consist of 2 or three people with "Iron Mike" (a computer) doing the driving.    Some of those ships probably do have a sensor based automatic warning system but likely not all.  If Bracken's theory is correct and the Fitzgerald was the stand on vessel when the merchantman made an untelegraphed abrupt turn to port the latter vessel would be at greater fault. Bear in mind that ships have collided in broad daylight in overtaking and crossing situations due to miscommunications.   

 

Re: US Navy Japanese container ship collision
« Reply #61 on: July 14, 2017, 04:45:08 PM »
It's been a while since I stood a bridge watch but I am not aware of any automatic warning system on Navy ships. 

There is an ample number of personnel on watch at all times while a U.S. Navy ship is underway.  Typically on the bridge there would an officer of the deck (OOD) an assistant OOD, one or more OOD's under instruction, the quartermaster of the watch (Navigator) and two or more helmsmen.  Also on watch  there would be a Combat Information Center (CÍC) team consisting of a CIC Watch Officer and 2 or more radar operators who would be instructed to report to the bridge and track any contacts within a certain distance, typically 5 Nautical miles but that would vary according to operating conditions.  There are also port and starboard and an aft lookouts.  There are several radar repeaters on the bridge and one in the captain's sea cabin.  As you can see there are a lot of "eyes on" while the ship is steaming and an automatic warning system has heretofore been considered unnecessary.  That may change with this incident but I think it will be found that an unfortunate series of errors on the part of personnel on both on ships occurred. 

Merchant ship's are much more sparsely manned and underway watches may consist of 2 or three people with "Iron Mike" (a computer) doing the driving.    Some of those ships probably do have sensor based automatic warning systems but likely not all.  If Bracken's theory is correct and the Fitzgerald was the stand on ship when the merchantman made an untelegraphed abrupt turn to port the latter vessel would be at greater fault. Bear in mind that ships have collided in broad daylight in overtaking and crossing situations due to miscommunications.   

Stop exaggerating your past achievements... do they even have bridges on herring fishing vessels ??

Re: US Navy Japanese container ship collision
« Reply #62 on: July 15, 2017, 05:29:20 PM »
Well She is in dry dock now.  Check out the patches they put over the huge hole below the water line.