Author What do you believe in?  (Read 2073 times)

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Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #30 on: January 15, 2017, 04:35:59 PM »
What about remote viewing? That has been well documented and the success rate is military record.
Success at remote viewing is evidence of one leg's not having to be material in the mind-world cx, but not for both legs, because the people succeeding at remote viewing are still living individuals.

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #31 on: January 15, 2017, 07:08:22 PM »
Majorette Dames remote viewed Ukraine as the safest place in the world, and moved there.  Not to mention the rest of his failed bullshit. 

Remote Viewing is no more accurate that the rest of so-called psychic ability.  There are educated guesses, and people remembering the lucky guesses and forgetting the ones that weren't accurate, and that's it.

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #32 on: January 16, 2017, 01:05:28 AM »




Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #33 on: January 18, 2017, 01:47:02 AM »
Majorette Dames remote viewed Ukraine as the safest place in the world, and moved there.  Not to mention the rest of his failed bullshit. 

Remote Viewing is no more accurate that the rest of so-called psychic ability.  There are educated guesses, and people remembering the lucky guesses and forgetting the ones that weren't accurate, and that's it.

That is not entirely accurate.

Dames has had quite a few "hits" which corresponds to his hit-rate.

Ingo Swan had a much higher hit rate, something around 80%.


Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #34 on: January 18, 2017, 01:55:22 AM »
That is not entirely accurate.

Dames has had quite a few "hits" which corresponds to his hit-rate.

Ingo Swan had a much higher hit rate, something around 80%.
Do you have any corroborating third-party documentation to back up your assertions?

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #35 on: January 18, 2017, 02:45:30 AM »
Do you have any corroborating third-party documentation to back up your assertions?

No, I go by a combination of logical analysis, personal experience and a the large amount of people involved in the program who are still in awe of what Ingo Swan was able to pull off.

I've been so immersed in the psi world for many years now that it is hard for me to believe that ANYONE truly does not believe in it just a little.

I mean everyone has had that creeping feeling before something bad happened or a prophetic dream of some kind.

Aliens are extremely telepathic because they are just simply more evolved in that way. We are now gaining or re-gaining these abilities.


Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #36 on: January 18, 2017, 02:51:47 AM »
No, I go by a combination of logical analysis, personal experience and a the large amount of people involved in the program who are still in awe of what Ingo Swan was able to pull off.

I've been so immersed in the psi world for many years now that it is hard for me to believe that ANYONE truly does not believe in it just a little.

I mean everyone has had that creeping feeling before something bad happened or a prophetic dream of some kind.

Aliens are extremely telepathic because they are just simply more evolved in that way. We are now gaining or re-gaining these abilities.

Name one thing Dames got right and then explain why he got the rest of them wrong.

Including this one:

http://trueorfalsewebsite.blogspot.com/2008/11/ed-dames-and-steve-fossett-crash.html?m=1

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #37 on: January 18, 2017, 02:57:17 AM »
Aliens are extremely telepathic because they are just simply more evolved in that way.

That's racist.

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #38 on: January 18, 2017, 03:02:08 AM »
Name one thing Dames got right and then explain why he got the rest of them wrong.

Including this one:

http://trueorfalsewebsite.blogspot.com/2008/11/ed-dames-and-steve-fossett-crash.html?m=1

I don't think I should need to look it up, it is well known that Dames has had his "hits" because he brags about them every time he is on the radio and openly admits his misses.

He "misses" because part of any "psi-practice" is, and this is VERY important, sorting out what is simply your own imagination and what is not.

Dames missed because he was paying attention to his own imagination instead of the proper channel with the right info. Pretty sure he would say the same thing but in his own words.

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #39 on: January 18, 2017, 03:23:47 AM »
Come on Daniel, Ed Dames is a fraud and he is horrible for the psi field. He's like a tv preacher, makes money, cons people but is a fraud

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #40 on: January 18, 2017, 03:30:37 AM »
Ingo swan wouldn't be famous if he didn't have such a dumbass name. Neither would peekaboo street or river fucking Phoenix

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #41 on: January 18, 2017, 03:31:00 AM »
Come on Daniel, Ed Dames is a fraud and he is horrible for the psi field. He's like a tv preacher, makes money, cons people but is a fraud

The techniques he teaches seem legitimate and he does have his "hits".

However I know what you mean "Doctor Doom" is more than a little self indulgent.

I don't care for the self indulgent type.

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #42 on: January 18, 2017, 03:31:37 AM »
Ingo swan wouldn't be famous if he didn't have such a dumbass name. Neither would peekaboo street or river fucking Phoenix

River Phoenix, a victim of celebrity Illuminati sex rings.

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #43 on: January 18, 2017, 03:33:24 AM »
River Phoenix, a victim of celebrity Illuminati sex rings.
great now I'm craving pizza lol

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #44 on: January 18, 2017, 04:24:55 AM »
The techniques he teaches seem legitimate and he does have his "hits".

However I know what you mean "Doctor Doom" is more than a little self indulgent.

I don't care for the self indulgent type.


Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #45 on: January 18, 2017, 04:48:52 AM »

I mean everyone has had that creeping feeling before something bad happened or a prophetic dream of some kind.


I saw my mother's death in a dream 8 months before she died.  All of the details of the dream were exactly the same as what happened.  This was in 2013.

Still I want to know where is Art's gold?

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #46 on: January 18, 2017, 06:15:52 AM »
I'm thinking of getting "I believe they grew him in a vat" tattooed on the back of my hand. What do you y'all think?



Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #47 on: January 18, 2017, 07:00:29 AM »
I saw my mother's death in a dream 8 months before she died.  All of the details of the dream were exactly the same as what happened.  This was in 2013.

Still I want to know where is Art's gold?

I want to find Mel's hole.

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #48 on: January 18, 2017, 07:20:38 AM »
Ingo swan wouldn't be famous if he didn't have such a dumbass name. Neither would peekaboo street or river fucking Phoenix
Or that fucknozzle M. Night Shyamalan.

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #49 on: January 18, 2017, 07:32:42 AM »
That is not entirely accurate.

Dames has had quite a few "hits" which corresponds to his hit-rate.

Ingo Swan had a much higher hit rate, something around 80%.

What I remember is Dames coming on Art's show, Art fawning over him for all his ''hits'', then an interview with more bullshit and more predictions that didn't pan out.  Except that the ''hits'' Art gave him were either not specifically referred to, or they were so vague they weren't really hits at all.  I remember so many times thinking 'wow, Art is giving him that one?'.

What these ''psychics'' tend to do is make predictions based on what they think will happen after what they think is careful analysis (move to Ukraine), or make so many predictions that a handful have to end up being accurate.  They are deliberately vague, then claim some event was what they predicted (''Art, I see fires in the west'').  Human nature is to forget the misses and remember the ''hits''.

As far as I'm concerned, he was less accurate than what one would expect from vagueness and random luck.


Not a ''Remote Viewer'', but a similar kind of bullshitter - here's one of them going with the odds in guessing certain things about people in a certain demographic, and falling flat on his face:


Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #50 on: January 18, 2017, 07:56:23 AM »
As far as I'm concerned, he was less accurate than



    Army Intelligence background.
    In the early 1980s part of the official remote viewing team, reportedly only as a monitor/interviewer.
    Said he was a mentor to remote viewer Ingo Swann.
    psitech.net/eddames.htm (accessed: August 27, 1999): "Major Dames retired from the U.S. Army, taking the original team's best and brightest with him to form his Beverly Hills, California based company, PSI TECH."
    psitech.net/#aboutus: "PSI TECH was founded in 1989 by a 4 star General [can't be 2 star general Albert Stubblebine, who is generally associated with PSI-TECH; considering 4-star generals are rare, and in case Psi-Tech isn't lying, I suspect General Car Stiner, head of U.S. Special Operations Command at the time and a friend of Colonel John Alexander] and a Military Intelligence officer [Ed Dames] who ushered a top secret information collection technology known as TRV (Technical Remote Viewing) out of the Pentagon and into the private sector."
    Psitech.net (at technicalremoteviewing.com), front page: "Major General Albert Stubblebine, former PSI TECH Chairman Of The Board and commanding officer of the U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM)."
    In the early 1990s at alien abduction TREAT conferences, which were sponsored by Opus Dei backer Prince Hans Adam von Liechtenstein, Dames told some amazingly creepy stories about hibernating aliens and genetic experimentation on humans.
    Trained English crop circle investigator Colin Andrews in remote viewing in the 1990s.
    In late late 190s he claimed the world would be destroyed by alien fungus spores.
    Later on he predicted his solar flare "killshot" end-of-the-world on almost every show as being just around the corner. None of these predictions ever came out, but he is always allowed to come back.
    Has claimed that Mars had a civilization which was killed off after Mars lost its atmosphere.
    Has claimed that Atlantis is located just to the north-east of Sardinia, Italy.
    Coast to Coast AM summary excerpts of Ed Dames' many visits: "Dames, one of the world's foremost remote viewers, is predicting a nuclear attack by the North Koreans which he said will come from a hidden tunnel. It will occur on the border between North and South Korea shortly after the US attacks Iraq [already a fact at this point, because it is March 2003], and its purpose will be to damage the American military that is stationed there. "The whole world will be horrified," said Dames who added that the Chinese will negotiate a deal in the aftermath. ... Dames is certain "the next use of a nuclear weapon will be on the Korean peninsula." He said the detonation of this nuclear device will usher us into World War III. According to Dames, the world will not remain at war. A series of solar flares he calls the "Kill shot" will hit earth causing widespread destruction, and put an end to the fighting. ... Living up to his nickname of 'Dr. Doom,' Dames said that conditions on Earth will be particularly gloomy after 2007. Solar events will heat up our planet like a "rotisserie" and there will be wars over water. ... . According to Dames, a 9+ magnitude earthquake, with an epicenter just off the northwest tip of New Guinea (Eastern Indonesia, 0.5 degrees S/131.5 degrees E), will occur sometime in March 2005. ... Dames shared several predictions. There will be a destructive Seattle-Tacoma earthquake, probably sometime in 2006, that will take buildings down and cause seawater to come in. Downtown Seattle is a particular danger spot, he implied. A number of diseases are becoming more problematic. Black mold (mycotoxin) that developed in the wake of the hurricanes in the Gulf Coast states will cause deaths. Avian flu will kill many birds in the US, and prion diseases will bring about the numerous deaths of cows and cattle. ... [Dames] found that it was a kind of capsule, projected from a planet quite far away, that is inhabited by intelligent insectoid beings. ... Remote viewing teacher Ed Dames shared updates on solar threats, ETs and other-dimensional visitors, as well as his recent work remote viewing why Mars lost its atmosphere, killing off its life and civilizations-- somewhat paralleling what Earth is about to go through. A very long time ago, he said, there was a large population on Mars, with two different races. Then, there was a brutal storm with high winds that lasted for about 10 years, leaving only about 15% of the populace left, living in shelters, he detailed. The genesis of the storm was a large passing body, possibly a 'Planet X,' that drew so close to Mars on its pass through our solar system that it caused a series of extreme wave-like crashes of air leading to the loss of Mars' atmosphere, he outlined. ... Regarding the solar "killshot" (view related DVD trailer), everything is pointing toward the 2013 time frame, "because it's the top of the solar cycle," he commented. The Earth's thinning ozone layer is looking like Swiss cheese to remote viewers, and there'll be a vast heating in the Earth's atmosphere. Most metropolitan areas, with a few exceptions (like Christchurch, New Zealand) won't serve as adequate sanctuaries from the killshot, he noted. However, a "Federation" outreach program, involving humans born off-world, will help us rebuild the planet, probably some 50 years out, he continued. Dames also spoke about extra-dimensional beings who act to prevent nuclear annihilation on our planet."

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #51 on: January 19, 2017, 10:32:13 PM »
Ok so Ingo Swan and every single person who was involved in the governments Remote Viewing program are all liars and scammers?

I find that really hard to believe.

For one thing they would not have even began the project if there was not something there and I have yet to hear from anyone who was involved who has said that there were no positive results.

Once again EVERYONE has had a moment of intuition, felt the eyes of someone staring at the back of their head or had prophetic dream like 21st Century Man stated(thank you for sharing btw). I have had several myself, more than I can count.

Obviously this is not an exact science and we don't have control of these abilities but the potential is obviously there.

For those who still doubt:

What about Twins?

Do you think the "one twin feels pain and the other feels it despite being miles away" is something completely fake and imaginary?




Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #52 on: January 19, 2017, 10:36:10 PM »
Or that fucknozzle M. Night Shyamalan.
Yes!  His movies are ripoffs of Outer Limits episodes.

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #53 on: January 19, 2017, 10:37:13 PM »
Remote Viewing is no more accurate that the rest of so-called psychic ability.  There are educated guesses, and people remembering the lucky guesses and forgetting the ones that weren't accurate, and that's it.

I predicted that you would say this.

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #54 on: January 19, 2017, 10:37:54 PM »
I predicted that you would say this.

I knew you would.

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #55 on: January 19, 2017, 11:02:24 PM »
http://deanradin.blogspot.com/2009/09/skeptic-agrees-that-remote-viewing-is.html

Quote
Excerpt from a January 2008 item in the UK's The Daily Mail newspaper:

    In 1995, the US Congress asked two independent scientists to assess whether the $20 million that the government had spent on psychic research had produced anything of value. And the conclusions proved to be somewhat unexpected.

    Professor Jessica Utts, a statistician from the University of California, discovered that remote viewers were correct 34 per cent of the time, a figure way beyond what chance guessing would allow.

    She says: "Using the standards applied to any other area of science, you have to conclude that certain psychic phenomena, such as remote viewing, have been well established.

    "The results are not due to chance or flaws in the experiments."

    Of course, this doesn't wash with sceptical scientists.

    Professor Richard Wiseman, a psychologist at the University of Hertfordshire, refuses to believe in remote viewing.

    He says: "I agree that by the standards of any other area of science that remote viewing is proven, but begs the question: do we need higher standards of evidence when we study the paranormal? I think we do.

    "If I said that there is a red car outside my house, you would probably believe me.

    "But if I said that a UFO had just landed, you'd probably want a lot more evidence.

    "Because remote viewing is such an outlandish claim that will revolutionise the world, we need overwhelming evidence before we draw any conclusions. Right now we don't have that evidence."

Thus, a prominent skeptic agrees that (1) the study of remote viewing is an area of science, which should thoroughly obviate the skeptical epithet of "pseudoscience" once and for all. And (2) that when judged against prevailing scientific standards for evaluating evidence, he agrees that remote viewing is proven. The follow-on argument that this phenomenon is so unusual that it requires more evidence refers not to evidence per se, or even to scientific methods or practice, but to assumptions about the fabric of reality.

I agree that remote viewing would be difficult to explain using 17th century ontology, which from today's perspective would be a naive, classical physics view of reality. But I suspect it will be explained through 21st century expansions of those assumptions.

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #56 on: January 20, 2017, 01:18:32 AM »
Ok so Ingo Swan and every single person who was involved in the governments Remote Viewing program are all liars and scammers?

I find that really hard to believe.

For one thing they would not have even began the project if there was not something there and I have yet to hear from anyone who was involved who has said that there were no positive results.

Once again EVERYONE has had a moment of intuition, felt the eyes of someone staring at the back of their head or had prophetic dream like 21st Century Man stated(thank you for sharing btw). I have had several myself, more than I can count.

Obviously this is not an exact science and we don't have control of these abilities but the potential is obviously there.

For those who still doubt:

What about Twins?

Do you think the "one twin feels pain and the other feels it despite being miles away" is something completely fake and imaginary?

People want to believe, and delude themselves.  It doesn't make them liars.  Some of them are liars.  This stuff certainly attracts a certain amount of nuts and flakes, eager to convince and be convinced.

Who said no positive results?  Educated guesses would fall under positive results.  So would random hits, certainly enough predictions would produce a certain amount of hits - the more vague, the higher the percentage.

It's human nature to remember the correct guesses, unusual situations, certain dreams, and forget the rest.

Thinking someone is looking at you from behind, there are many explanations.  You saw someone subconsciously out of the corner of your eye, then no other movement, then turn around.  Sure enough they're looking at you.  People people-watch.  Another time you turn around to find someone staring, your mind tricks you into thinking you had a strange feeling beforehand.  Someone looks familiar, you turn around and they may be looking in your direction, but you don't know them.  These situations are remembered, a zillion other situations aren't.  Etcetera.

The mind is very persuasive.  Did I mention people want to believe?

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #57 on: January 20, 2017, 02:19:38 AM »
People want to believe, and delude themselves.  It doesn't make them liars.  Some of them are liars.  This stuff certainly attracts a certain amount of nuts and flakes, eager to convince and be convinced.

Who said no positive results?  Educated guesses would fall under positive results.  So would random hits, certainly enough predictions would produce a certain amount of hits - the more vague, the higher the percentage.

It's human nature to remember the correct guesses, unusual situations, certain dreams, and forget the rest.

Thinking someone is looking at you from behind, there are many explanations.  You saw someone subconsciously out of the corner of your eye, then no other movement, then turn around.  Sure enough they're looking at you.  People people-watch.  Another time you turn around to find someone staring, your mind tricks you into thinking you had a strange feeling beforehand.  Someone looks familiar, you turn around and they may be looking in your direction, but you don't know them.  These situations are remembered, a zillion other situations aren't.  Etcetera.

The mind is very persuasive.  Did I mention people want to believe?

Sure people want to believe but that still does not convincingly explain why everyone who was involved with the program confirms that there were positive results.

I really doubt that it is all some wishful thinking cult, that seems much more far fetched than the idea that remote viewing is possible.

How would you "get lucky" if you described the exact location of something and what it looked like?

They logged all their results and measures an average of the results against chance. Therefore it is virtually impossible that it is a case of "lucky guesses" because that aspect was accounted for and looked at by unbiased scientists, in my last post.

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #58 on: January 20, 2017, 02:32:27 AM »
Sure people want to believe but that still does not convincingly explain why everyone who was involved with the program confirms that there were positive results.

I really doubt that it is all some wishful thinking cult, that seems much more far fetched than the idea that remote viewing is possible.

How would you "get lucky" if you described the exact location of something and what it looked like?

They logged all their results and measures an average of the results against chance. Therefore it is virtually impossible that it is a case of "lucky guesses" because that aspect was accounted for and looked at by unbiased scientists, in my last post.

So why did the military drop it?  Seems cheap enough to pay a roomful of guys to carry on with it if it was delivering results.

Re: What do you believe in?
« Reply #59 on: January 20, 2017, 02:38:49 AM »
Why was Dames's record on Coast so dreadful?  He had months between Coast appearances, and really only had time on the show to make what he thought would be his very best predictions.  They were laughable.

I used to think it was possible there was something to some of the various issues.  Listening to Art Bell's guests, it became very apparent they were all full of shit.