Author Semi-Non-Random Cryptography Links & Discussion  (Read 990 times)

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Semi-Non-Random Cryptography Links & Discussion
« on: May 10, 2014, 11:18:35 AM »
The algorithm’s first few thousand attempts are always way, way off. But with every pass, it figures out a few words. And those isolated answers inch the algorithm closer and closer to the correct key. Eventually the computer finds the most statistically likely set of translation rules, the one that properly interprets as XYZ “yes” and ZYXWV as “quiet.”



The Oculists’ seal, featuring a cataract needle, a pair of pince-nez, and two cats watching over mice.
Photo: Niedersä Landesarchiv-Staatsarchiv Wolfenbüttel


“As a Mason you are not allowed to write down—let alone publish—your rituals,” Snoek said. So how do you spread your ideas? You publish esoteric rites as if they are exposures—public outings of Masonry. Except you publish in code, so only an elite cadre of fellow Masons can read the dangerous things you have to say. And when your mission is over, you stuff all the evidence into a box that doesn’t get opened for nearly 150 years.

Re: Semi-Non-Random Crytography Links & Discussion
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2014, 11:34:09 AM »
The mice are the humans.  The cats are our ancient Egyptian overlords.

Re: Semi-Non-Random Cryptography Links & Discussion
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2014, 11:46:13 AM »
The mice are the humans.  The cats are our ancient Egyptian overlords.

"Schaefer stared at the screen. She had spent a dozen years with the cipher. Knight had broken the whole thing open in just a few weeks."


Re: Semi-Non-Random Cryptography Links & Discussion
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2014, 01:09:34 PM »
"Schaefer stared at the screen. She had spent a dozen years with the cipher. Knight had broken the whole thing open in just a few weeks."
And I did it in less than 10 seconds of reading the post.

Re: Semi-Non-Random Cryptography Links & Discussion
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2014, 01:27:57 PM »
You're using it!


Re: Semi-Non-Random Cartography Links & Discussion
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2014, 02:57:41 PM »


I stumbled across this one earlier today, and decided what the hell, I have twenty-two minutes to kill, why not? By the time he trotted out the Akenaten glyphs at the fifteen minute mark, I was already hooked.

This video's narrator exhibits that rare skill of weaving obvious truth with hysterical bullshit to the extent that the product is equally entertaining, irrespective of whether the information is "real" or not. Recommended highly.

Also, there will be a quiz later.

Re: Semi-Non-Random Cartography Links & Discussion
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2014, 03:37:57 PM »
Also, there will be a quiz later.

[attachimg=1]

Re: Semi-Non-Random Cryptography Links & Discussion
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2014, 10:48:25 PM »
The algorithm’s first few thousand attempts are always way, way off. But with every pass, it figures out a few words. And those isolated answers inch the algorithm closer and closer to the correct key. Eventually the computer finds the most statistically likely set of translation rules, the one that properly interprets as XYZ “yes” and ZYXWV as “quiet.”


“As a Mason you are not allowed to write down—let alone publish—your rituals,” Snoek said. So how do you spread your ideas? You publish esoteric rites as if they are exposures—public outings of Masonry. Except you publish in code, so only an elite cadre of fellow Masons can read the dangerous things you have to say. And when your mission is over, you stuff all the evidence into a box that doesn’t get opened for nearly 150 years.

The first one... yeah read about that one a couple months ago, around the time Coast did the Voynich manuscript show.  Hoping that story gets turned into a documentary someday.

Masons... I'm familiar with what I've seen called the "Masonic Cypher"  which is the letters of the alphabet wrote in two sets of a # and X, one with dots and the other without...

On the topic as a whole, speaking about cryptography, not cartography... there's been many cases over the years of famous codes and cyphers hitting the news, and not always about military matters or buried treasure.

Re: Semi-Non-Random Cartography Links & Discussion
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2014, 11:49:55 PM »

Where are the men in white coats when you need them?

Re: Semi-Non-Random Cryptography Links & Discussion
« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2017, 02:41:53 AM »
"According to another top official also involved with the program, the NSA made an enormous breakthrough several years ago in its ability to cryptanalyze, or break, unfathomably complex encryption systems employed by not only governments around the world but also many average computer users in the US. The upshot, according to this official: “Everybody’s a target; everybody with communication is a target.”

https://www.wired.com/2012/03/ff_nsadatacenter/


" Vesuvius, the world’s largest quantum computer is now operational at the Bluffdale, Utah NSA station  "


http://universal-machine.blogspot.com/2012/04/vesuvius-512-qubit-quantum-computer.html

Look at the dates these were published. :o   ;)

Re: Semi-Non-Random Cryptography Links & Discussion
« Reply #10 on: March 28, 2017, 01:24:33 PM »
Look at the dates these were published.


Quote
This breakaway human civilization exists embedded within their matrix and uses their own technological games against them.


:o   ;)




Re: Semi-Non-Random Cryptography Links & Discussion
« Reply #12 on: April 10, 2017, 01:43:41 AM »
“As a Mason you are not allowed to write down—let alone publish—your rituals,”