Author David Paulides Missing 411  (Read 35963 times)

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Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #60 on: May 25, 2015, 01:17:19 AM »
Oxford I believe.
 8)

I doubt RCH attended Old Miss either.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #61 on: May 28, 2015, 06:32:06 PM »


Paulides was interesting at first, but is now slipping down to RCH and Ed Dames levels.

Hence the reason why Art needs to have him on as one of his guests! I think Art would force his hand. Art would definitely ask the right questions, would let callers ask pertinent questions and reiterate them till a answer is given.

Also, the National Park service has their own police and rangers. Why they wouldn't have a database on missing people does seem odd.

http://www.federallawenforcement.org/national-park-service/


"Park rangers working in a protective detail must also possess (or have the ability to obtain) an NPS Type II Law Enforcement Commission.

Law enforcement rangers, who serve as federal law enforcement officers, perform duties related to the detection and investigation of violations of federal criminal laws, the apprehension and detention of violators, the protection of life and property, and the enforcement of all applicable laws, rules, and regulations."

....and no database for those who go missing?

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #62 on: May 28, 2015, 06:57:17 PM »
I doubt RCH attended Old Miss either.
He is kind of a rebel.  I can't believe Ole Miss went from this



to this



An anthropomorphic bear?  What a bunch of wienies.  19.5 my friend.  19.5.


Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #63 on: May 29, 2015, 12:51:12 AM »
Hence the reason why Art needs to have him on as one of his guests! I think Art would force his hand. Art would definitely ask the right questions, would let callers ask pertinent questions and reiterate them till a answer is given.

Also, the National Park service has their own police and rangers. Why they wouldn't have a database on missing people does seem odd.

http://www.federallawenforcement.org/national-park-service/


"Park rangers working in a protective detail must also possess (or have the ability to obtain) an NPS Type II Law Enforcement Commission.

Law enforcement rangers, who serve as federal law enforcement officers, perform duties related to the detection and investigation of violations of federal criminal laws, the apprehension and detention of violators, the protection of life and property, and the enforcement of all applicable laws, rules, and regulations."

....and no database for those who go missing?

The NPS Police don't have the resources to handle stuff like that, plain and simple.

I'll say it again: I asked Paulides point blank on his last time talking to Knapp if he had asked someone in Congress to make the NAtional Park Service to keep a missing persons database. Paulides just pulled the old "they don't want you to know" conspiracy spank crap. That was even with Knapp volunteering to ask C2C listeners to petition their members of Congress to do so.

Paulides doesn't really care about finding an answer to the (supposed) mystery, he just want to exploit it.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #64 on: May 31, 2015, 05:42:55 PM »

Also, the National Park service has their own police and rangers. Why they wouldn't have a database on missing people does seem odd.

The Park Service (DoI) does maintain records.

His line about the Park Service not releasing records is his "out". They have records and certainly released them to Michael Ghiglieri and Charles Farabee when they authored Off the Wall: Death in Yosemite. Now Dave's fallback position is that Charles Farabee had an inside track to records because he is a retired Ranger from the park service. That may or may not be. His co-author Michael Ghiglieri wrote another book without Charles Farabee, Over the Edge: Death in Grand Canyon and did not seem to have any issues getting records for that book.

One must ask, is Dave inept at initiating FOIA requests? Or is it because the Park Service does not want to deal with a nut-job based on his shady past and dealings with all things supernatural?

Maybe, (and this is my opinion and probably the reason) requesting THE ENTIRE LIST OF MISSING people is a logistical challenge that would cost the Department of the Interior countless hundreds of man-hours to compile.  Why give these records to him so he can enrich himself for free or at a reduced cost?

There are all kinds of records out there and most are in the public domain. Dave makes wild and outrageous claims without a scintilla of evidence or documents to back them up. He is relying on his "I am a retired Police Officer" spiel, and he is the only one able to get this information without any further scrutiny. That is why his Army of salivating fans come out of the woodwork to thank him for writing this dribble. His fans fail to ask the important question. Why has it been three years and he has utterly failed and failed miserably to garner absolutely no attention from the mainstream media, Congress or the Department of the Interior regarding his so called park services' cover up? Gee, I would think with the vast conspiracy you would think that Dave would at least get someone on the case.


Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #65 on: May 31, 2015, 05:50:06 PM »

I'll say it again: I asked Paulides point blank on his last time talking to Knapp if he had asked someone in Congress to make the NAtional Park Service to keep a missing persons database. Paulides just pulled the old "they don't want you to know" conspiracy spank crap. That was even with Knapp volunteering to ask C2C listeners to petition their members of Congress to do so.

Paulides doesn't really care about finding an answer to the (supposed) mystery, he just want to exploit it.

These are nothing more than an interesting collection of missing persons and David Paulides is CLEARLY trying to attribute the disappearances to Bigfoot. He's a big time BIGFOOT "researcher" and he's constantly and subtly implicating Bigfoot in the cases. His claim of "offering no theories" is a smokescreen.

In real research, scientists need to disclose their conflicts of interest to their overseeing agencies, because those things make a difference to conclusions. Study design and methodology is important when you want your analysis of anything to be taken seriously at all. Data does not exist in a vacuum but needs to be contextualized by how it was gathered and who analyzed it (that's another reason why, in real research, researches look for Intercoder reliability to judge that the researchers have minimized bias errors through consensus).

Data is not judged purely on its merits, it's judged on the merits of the atmosphere in which it was collected and processed. The fact that Dave Paulides is obsessed with all things Bigfoot is hugely relevant to how he has interpreted his data.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #66 on: June 24, 2015, 03:08:21 AM »
Personally, I did find the stories fascinating the first couple times he was on, but by the forth time I really had my doubts.  I don't have any evidence one way or the other, but there is just something about his diction and repetition that makes it sound like he is perpetuating a lie, or perhaps I should say a tall tale.  I know extraordinary numbers of people do go missing, but my own inclination is that a national park is an easier place to get rid of someone you don't like than, say, Manhattan.

I went out and read up about several of the cases he presented.
The guy isn't lying.  The cases are as he presents them.

The one charge that has been laid at his feet is that he is picking and choosing cases that all match his pattern. But.. he's looking at a profile, so of course that's what will happen.

He's grouping them together and that might be misleading. BUT actually they are damned weird cases.

There are several which just totally defy explanation -- people only out of sight for only seconds, with no obvious place to go, in extremely well searched areas, and nothing is ever found.
Or kids who somehow climb up mountains, or through swamps, and end up 30 to 40 miles outside the search area.

If any of the cases seem weird, or like he's making something up, write down the name of the person, and go do your own research. You don't need Paulides

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #67 on: June 24, 2015, 03:17:53 AM »
Quote
He implies the Parks Service Police are covering something up is insulting and dishonest. Also dishonest is his record as a police officer. Paulides leaves off his arrest for soliciting celebrity autographs on police stationary.

Am I understanding this correctly?

He asked celebrities to sign pieces of paper which belonged to the police department?

You can get arrested for that??

I would think that would be a "Hey, don't use office supplies for personal stuff" conversation.

That has to be the most benign misdeameanor I've ever heard of.

Quote
Paulides' outright refusal to acknowledge paradoxical undressing as well as terminal burrowing, which are both related to Hypothermia. He is so dreadfully ill-informed relative to both of these factors that they could account for a MAJORITY of the cases outlined in "Missing 411"  The vast majority of the cases in Missing 411 are not bizarre or mysterious as Paulides would have you believe; rather they follow the general conventions of a lost person, especially if those people are suffering from the effects of hypothermia. The conspicuous denial of these factors enables Paulides to shoehorn his ideas into a serious flawed theory!

He repeatedly mentions cases in which the missing person was a very young child -- to young to have untied their own shoes or taken off their own clothes.

Or some cases where this undressing appears to have occurred within the first few seconds / minutes of the disappearance.

So both of those seem unlikely to be paradoxical undressing.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #68 on: June 24, 2015, 03:39:26 AM »
To articulate that the park service doesn't keep records is disingenuous and an outright LIE. A more accurate description would be that the Park Service won't give them to him. Perhaps it's because of his shady past and his known associations with all things Bigfoot.

Yes, but that would also be an illegal decision to make.
When you file an FOIA request they can't ask you why you want it, or what you plan to do with it.
You can provide that information to help them find data which may be relevant to your request.
But it is entirely illegal for a government agency to think "That dude believes in Bigfoot, so we won't release for that reason."


Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #69 on: June 24, 2015, 03:44:29 AM »
Any opposition or family member complaints/contradictions would be hard pressed to voice their abjections due to the one-sided manner of these venues.

They could call up the show and refute his claims on air.
Or, you know, he's made specific claims of talking to specific people.
If my kid disappeared, and he went on the air claiming to have interviewed me about it, and he hadn't -- I'd sue.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #70 on: June 24, 2015, 03:46:31 AM »
Am I understanding this correctly?

He asked celebrities to sign pieces of paper which belonged to the police department?

You can get arrested for that??

I would think that would be a "Hey, don't use office supplies for personal stuff" conversation.

That has to be the most benign misdeameanor I've ever heard of.

He repeatedly mentions cases in which the missing person was a very young child -- to young to have untied their own shoes or taken off their own clothes.

Or some cases where this undressing appears to have occurred within the first few seconds / minutes of the disappearance.

So both of those seem unlikely to be paradoxical undressing.


My nephews have become quite proficient in removing their clothes at most inappropriate moments, such as family gatherings. They've been able to do it since they were at least two.

And uniting shoes isn't that hard for a "young child," either.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #71 on: June 24, 2015, 03:48:10 AM »
The NPS Police don't have the resources to handle stuff like that, plain and simple.

Right, you go to any computer running Windows 95 or later.
Create an excel spread sheet

Put these rows in

Missing person name
Missing person location
Missing person time/date disappearance
Missing person time/date found
Investigating officers

Spend 1 minute updating and saving this spreadsheet per missing person.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #72 on: June 24, 2015, 03:51:41 AM »

My nephews have become quite proficient in removing their clothes at most inappropriate moments, such as family gatherings. They've been able to do it since they were at least two.

And uniting shoes isn't that hard for a "young child," either.

Yes, I to have experience with my own kids removing clothing at weird times.

Some of these cases involved non-verbal and non-able children.
And yet there are still claims of paradoxical undressing.
Or mountains being climbed with no shoes.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #73 on: June 24, 2015, 03:56:04 AM »
Right, you go to any computer running Windows 95 or later.
Create an excel spread sheet

Put these rows in

Missing person name
Missing person location
Missing person time/date disappearance
Missing person time/date found
Investigating officers

Spend 1 minute updating and saving this spreadsheet per missing person.

All of which take human resources, and money. All of which, thanks to Congress' continual slashing of the NPS budget, the NPS is severely lacking in.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #74 on: June 24, 2015, 04:06:39 AM »
Also note that I have previously detailed my experience of calling into C2C on a night Knapp was interviewing Paulides, where I asked if he had petitioned a member or members of Congress in regards to authorizing (making) the NPS to write out the reports you suggested.

Paulides scoffed at the idea, suggesting "they" (Congress) didn't want us to know" what was going on" in the usual conspiracy spank manner.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #75 on: June 24, 2015, 04:11:57 AM »
All of which take human resources, and money. All of which, thanks to Congress' continual slashing of the NPS budget, the NPS is severely lacking in.

I'm a big confused here.
Don't park rangers have to document what they do?
In any government related, or publicly funded related, job I've ever had -- I spend far too much time filling out paperwork, checking boxes, and justifying my existence.

A good portion of your day is filling out mindless pieces of paperwork.


Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #76 on: June 24, 2015, 04:17:05 AM »
I'm a big confused here.
Don't park rangers have to document what they do?
In any government related, or publicly funded related, job I've ever had -- I spend far too much time filling out paperwork, checking boxes, and justifying my existence.

A good portion of your day is filling out mindless pieces of paperwork.


And thanks to budget cuts, the paperwork is backing up while the ability to provide the manpower has been stretched to the limits.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #77 on: June 24, 2015, 04:26:10 AM »

And thanks to budget cuts, the paperwork is backing up while the ability to provide the manpower has been stretched to the limits.

Money is tight and I'm sure the parks are woefully underfunded.

It seems to me though that law enforcement and rangers, at any capacity, in this day and age must make records -- if even to avoid law suits. Or to try to justify the need for more funding.

With tight funds, you think the pressure to do paperwork would go up.
"We need to PROVE that Ranger Bob didn't spend all his time in the middle of the woods picking wild flowers."

So you sit Ranger Bob behind a desk for 7 hours a day, documenting what he needs to do the 5 hours a day he's allowed to do his job.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #78 on: June 24, 2015, 04:50:11 AM »
Money is tight and I'm sure the parks are woefully underfunded.

It seems to me though that law enforcement and rangers, at any capacity, in this day and age must make records -- if even to avoid law suits. Or to try to justify the need for more funding.

With tight funds, you think the pressure to do paperwork would go up.
"We need to PROVE that Ranger Bob didn't spend all his time in the middle of the woods picking wild flowers."

So you sit Ranger Bob behind a desk for 7 hours a day, documenting what he needs to do the 5 hours a day he's allowed to do his job.


Along with Ranger Bob having to do the jobs of the three Rangers they had to lay off because of the last wave of budget cuts.


And he doesn't have the time to waste on an obvious FOIA troll and conspiracy spank who wants records from a missing persons case in 1946 to "prove" his all-but-unspoken theory that Bigfoot is killing kids and taking off their clothes in the forest.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #79 on: June 24, 2015, 06:18:53 AM »
I went out and read up about several of the cases he presented.
The guy isn't lying.  The cases are as he presents them.

He cites apocryphal details that don't show up in any case files.  Without names to verify I am not taking him at his word.  In the years I have been involved with S&R I've never heard of cases of a shoeless person without cuts, I have seen and found people without a shoe, jackets, shirts etc.....All attributed to hypothermia.  So where is he getting this information? A prime example of that would be the Stacey Arras case, he has claimed ad nausea that he will never see the file…..But claims a camera lens cap was found. 

There is a case file on her disappearance. The China Lake Mountain Rescue Group.  They were on scene and found nothing.  Her disappearance was also recounted by Butch Ferebee in Off the Wall and he indicated that nothing was found.   

Ultimately, he is not a reliable researcher because his methodology is questionable and his descriptions of the incidents are too often massaged to fit his spooky implications.  His stuff is BS filled with embellishments intended to add spooky paranormal/bigfoot/dog men/wendigo mojo to true and unfortunate disappearances of real people.
 



 

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #80 on: June 24, 2015, 06:30:20 AM »
I went out and read up about several of the cases he presented.
The guy isn't lying.  The cases are as he presents them.


There are several which just totally defy explanation -- people only out of sight for only seconds, with no obvious place to go, in extremely well searched areas, and nothing is ever found.
Or kids who somehow climb up mountains, or through swamps, and end up 30 to 40 miles outside the search area.

That is according to Paulides.  Please provide some names so we/I can fact check it.  Just because Paulides says so.....don't make it so.  Searches and searchers aren't perfect.  Missed areas can be attributed to mapping errors and search coordination, under lap and overlap.  This is especially true with rough terrain.  Again I have never heard of someone ending up 30-40 miles away.  There are quite a few cases outside of Paulides' campfire stories were nothing was found, including the people.  It happens, and depending on terrain and how FAST a search was initiated can be attributed to this. 

Most lost people WILL go to higher ground to get a bearing, that's not strange or mysterious.  Without names of people who climbed mountains I ain't buying it.

 

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #81 on: June 24, 2015, 07:13:20 AM »
That is according to Paulides.  Please provide some names so we/I can fact check it.  Just because Paulides says so.....don't make it so. 

I think it was his second appearance, but maybe it was bits of the first and the second, what I decided to do was jot down every name he mentioned and go look them up.

That was quite some time ago, so I don't remember the names. I could go back and listen and do it all again.

There was one case which he mentioned, which really seemed like a woman running away from a terrible marriage once I dug into it. But even then, the case is still very strange, I'd love to know how she did it. Because there were witnesses who saw her go down the dip of a trail, and she flat out disappeared. Never a trace found of her in decades. And that's pretty impressive. Not impressive in I suspect something supernatural, impressive in -- how did she arrange and maintain her disappearance over years and decades?

Quote
Searches and searchers aren't perfect.  Missed areas can be attributed to mapping errors and search coordination, under lap and overlap.  This is especially true with rough terrain.  Again I have never heard of someone ending up 30-40 miles away.  There are quite a few cases outside of Paulides' campfire stories were nothing was found, including the people.  It happens, and depending on terrain and how FAST a search was initiated can be attributed to this. 

I tell you one way Paulides stacks the deck in his favor. And this is a real obvious piece of misdirection on his part.

He keeps suggesting that the mysterious force behind these disappearances somehow knows how to act shortly before severe weather hits the area.

As if it knows that bad weather is coming and therefore it acts at that time to evade detection.

I'm calling bullshit.

In those cases its painfully obvious that what's happened isn't some weather predicting supernatural occurence -- but instead, just bad weather frustrating a search or preventing a search. Just bad luck.

The people aren't found because they are unlucky to go missing right before bad weather hit.

If the weather hadn't turned bad suddenly, it would be a run of the mill disappearance and they likely would have been found quickly.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #82 on: June 24, 2015, 07:21:18 AM »
He cites apocryphal details that don't show up in any case files.  Without names to verify I am not taking him at his word.  In the years I have been involved with S&R I've never heard of cases of a shoeless person without cuts, I have seen and found people without a shoe, jackets, shirts etc.....All attributed to hypothermia.  So where is he getting this information? A prime example of that would be the Stacey Arras case, he has claimed ad nausea that he will never see the file…..But claims a camera lens cap was found. 

There is a case file on her disappearance. The China Lake Mountain Rescue Group.  They were on scene and found nothing.  Her disappearance was also recounted by Butch Ferebee in Off the Wall and he indicated that nothing was found.   

Ultimately, he is not a reliable researcher because his methodology is questionable and his descriptions of the incidents are too often massaged to fit his spooky implications.  His stuff is BS filled with embellishments intended to add spooky paranormal/bigfoot/dog men/wendigo mojo to true and unfortunate disappearances of real people.

Okay, lets put Paulides aside for one moment and agree that his research is at best highly selective and massaged (as I totally agree it is highly selective and massaged).

So putting Paulides in a corner and forgetting about him, and just a question from me to you -

You've been involved with S&R?  So is there any cases you've ever heard of which has elements which baffle the S&R teams?

And to make this clear - I DO NOT MEAN evidence of Bigfoot, or UFOs, or portals.

I mean, just down to earth, weird stuff which is hard to explain or seemingly inexplicable from what evidence was or for some reason could not be recovered?

Because as a lay person, with no S&R experience, I've read a few cases which just seem really weird. I don't mean from the Paulides set. But from other sources over the years.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #83 on: June 24, 2015, 10:14:56 AM »

Along with Ranger Bob having to do the jobs of the three Rangers they had to lay off because of the last wave of budget cuts.


And he doesn't have the time to waste on an obvious FOIA troll and conspiracy spank who wants records from a missing persons case in 1946 to "prove" his all-but-unspoken theory that Bigfoot is killing kids and taking off their clothes in the forest.



It doesn't matter in the slightest what Ranger Bob's personal feelings are regarding a FOIA request, he is mandated by law to fulfill that request. That is, as long as the FOIA request doesn't' seek any information that is exempted under several provisions in the law.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #84 on: June 24, 2015, 12:46:14 PM »
I glanced through and Paulides claims he did attempt to contact a congressman by the name of Ian Campbell on this issue and he got no help.

Now, look over your own comments above guys.
You keep saying the rangers aren't going to go out of their way to help some bigfoot nut.
So they will ignore his foia request.
Now, legally they shouldn't do that, but I can buy that you guys got that right.
Why hand over their records to a bigfoot nut?

But those guys are rangers and park service employees.
So imagine you are a member of congress.
Are you going to went to be known as the congressman working on investigations with the crazy Bigfoot guy?

Wouldn't working with bigfoot researchers be political suicide? Or at the best least give your opponent some pretty good ammo against you at the next election?

I mean, if I was a congressman, I really wouldn't eat to know any bigfoot researchers or ufologists

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #85 on: June 24, 2015, 08:09:14 PM »
Okay, lets put Paulides aside for one moment and agree that his research is at best highly selective and massaged (as I totally agree it is highly selective and massaged).

So putting Paulides in a corner and forgetting about him, and just a question from me to you -

You've been involved with S&R?  So is there any cases you've ever heard of which has elements which baffle the S&R teams?

And to make this clear - I DO NOT MEAN evidence of Bigfoot, or UFOs, or portals.

I mean, just down to earth, weird stuff which is hard to explain or seemingly inexplicable from what evidence was or for
some reason could not be recovered?

Because as a lay person, with no S&R experience, I've read a few cases which just seem really weird. I don't mean from the Paulides set. But from other sources over the years.

No.  Since 92 I have never experienced or heard anything unusual.  SAR is a small community and something FOOTY would travel faster than a flu bug.
 

Weird is a subjective word.  Reading about stories is a different ballgame compared to being out there looking for someone.  It's visceral if you have never experienced it firsthand.  My very first recovery was a man who was found partially clothed.  This was in the mid 90’s, in the middle of winter.   I thought he was the victim of a crime the way we found him.  That first exposure to hypothermia culminating in his attempt at burrowing (He was found under exposed tree roots) was weird to me. 

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #86 on: June 24, 2015, 08:19:04 PM »


It doesn't matter in the slightest what Ranger Bob's personal feelings are regarding a FOIA request, he is mandated by law to fulfill that request. That is, as long as the FOIA request doesn't' seek any information that is exempted under several provisions in the law.

This is where he loses credibility.  He makes the claim that they won’t honor his request.  If this is in writing then he does have recourse.  However, if it’s a…..Hey they told me over the phone type of thing it becomes his word over the Park Service.  That may or may not be the case.  Regardless he doesn’t reprint any of these “rejection” letters or correspondences and it comes down to his credibility. 

I am curious does it ever occur to his fans the reason he's being quoted thousands of dollars for the information is because he's asking for thousands of pages of cases and hundreds of hours of work to be done? 

He's asked FOIA for every missing person in every National Park from the past 100 years.  Yeah, there are problems with government transparency and FOIA documents, but his project is not a highlight of that problem. It's a highlight of his ego issues.  He requests a waiver, but fails to understand that waivers are reserved for journalists and if memory serves…..you have to be providing something educational or vital to public knowledge to get a waiver. I have doubts that weird missing person cases ranks very high as 'vital public knowledge'.

Your mileage may very.
 

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #87 on: June 24, 2015, 09:18:28 PM »
I think it was his second appearance, but maybe it was bits of the first and the second, what I decided to do was jot down every name he mentioned and go look them up.

That was quite some time ago, so I don't remember the names. I could go back and listen and do it all again.

There was one case which he mentioned, which really seemed like a woman running away from a terrible marriage once I dug into it. But even then, the case is still very strange, I'd love to know how she did it. Because there were witnesses who saw her go down the dip of a trail, and she flat out disappeared. Never a trace found of her in decades. And that's pretty impressive. Not impressive in I suspect something supernatural, impressive in -- how did she arrange and maintain her disappearance over years and decades?

That doesn't ring a bell.  I have his first two books.  If you come across the name I can look into it.
 
 
I tell you one way Paulides stacks the deck in his favor. And this is a real obvious piece of misdirection on his part.

He keeps suggesting that the mysterious force behind these disappearances somehow knows how to act shortly before severe weather hits the area.

As if it knows that bad weather is coming and therefore it acts at that time to evade detection.

I'm calling bullshit.

Bad weather can happen for a couple of reasons.  In a lot of parks at higher elevations mountainous topography has an interesting effect on weather.  Brief storms blow in more afternoons than not and as a result the subject will be found deceased, because hypothermia can set it remarkably quick, even in the summer.

Time is of the essence in SAR operations, and bad weather that delays or hinders a search is not good.  Since a big part of Paulides' profile is basically "there's no coherent understanding of the time missing," a dead person is going to fit the profile better because they're not able to explain how they got there.

Bad weather that isn't quite bad enough to delay the search hinders visibility, and washes away scent rendering tracking dogs useless.  This increases the chance that a team will miss an unresponsive person who is found later in an area that was searched.   Children also hide from searches which is another reason they are found in areas already searched.     

In those cases its painfully obvious that what's happened isn't some weather predicting supernatural occurence -- but instead, just bad weather frustrating a search or preventing a search. Just bad luck.

The people aren't found because they are unlucky to go missing right before bad weather hit.

If the weather hadn't turned bad suddenly, it would be a run of the mill disappearance and they likely would have been found quickly.

You got it.  It's one of his coincidence is correlation. 
 

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #88 on: June 24, 2015, 09:29:37 PM »
wow very good thread. I had a personal experience of going hunting on what I thought was going to be a 5 minute peek in the woods with my dad. It was december in alaska and neither of us were dressed to be in the elements. I just thought I could drive to the top of a mountain and jump of if I saw a deer. I saw one and we both jumped out and followed the deer about 100 yards. Long story short I got turned around and we hiked down the mountain through the night cold as heck. At one point I tried to cover up my dad in a hole in the muskeg but couldn't dig the hole deep enough so luckily I found a river or creek and dropped my gun and he and I got in the river and ended up at a road.  So basicily what I'm saying is that if we would have died my truck was left with the keys in it, maybe even my wallet, my gun was gone, I lost my shoes, I almost buried my dad in a muskeg hole and would have been found miles from where I parked. None of this due to anything other than bad luck and hypothermia.

Re: David Paulides Missing 411
« Reply #89 on: June 25, 2015, 06:34:26 AM »
Most lost people WILL go to higher ground to get a bearing, that's not strange or mysterious.  Without names of people who climbed mountains I ain't buying it.
[/quote]


ok, we get it, you don't like David Paulides  :o  tell you what,  I will trade you Marzulli and Hoagland for  Paulides? ;)