Author Topic: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.  (Read 29204 times)

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Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #810 on: June 07, 2019, 02:18:22 AM »





Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #811 on: June 10, 2019, 03:03:41 AM »

It would have been fun to sip cocktails under that starry sky.


Bob Weir, guitarist and singer for The Grateful Dead was born on October 16, 1947.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #812 on: June 11, 2019, 02:22:52 AM »



A birthday postcard from 1909.  I thought it was a St. Patrick’s Day card though, what with those hanging four leaf clovers.


Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #813 on: June 12, 2019, 02:45:23 AM »




Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #814 on: June 14, 2019, 03:46:52 AM »




Hello Girls:
Hope you
are good.
Grandma
will see you
the 11th
Love to all
  Grandma
  XOXOXO

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #815 on: June 16, 2019, 10:10:10 PM »
The current full moon out there is called a full Strawberry Moon.  Here is a postcard with a full moon on it:




Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #816 on: June 18, 2019, 02:03:58 AM »



Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #817 on: June 20, 2019, 02:09:37 AM »





An advert for the Frank Brothers Boot Shop.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #818 on: June 22, 2019, 02:13:58 AM »



Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #819 on: June 22, 2019, 10:46:31 AM »

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #820 on: June 25, 2019, 02:59:45 AM »

Cool!  Like an early day surfboard.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #821 on: June 25, 2019, 03:14:49 AM »

Yet a third Sweden House Smorgasbord restaurant, where you can find gracious dinning without extravagance.  This postcard however, doesn't say that you can have all the food that you care to eat, like the other two did.  The food isn't too easy to see, but I think there might be a cooked turkey sitting up at the far right, but I'll need K_Dubb to back me up on it.  (The other two Sweden House postcards are on the previous page.)   


Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #822 on: June 26, 2019, 02:10:01 AM »

A Datsun 310.


Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #823 on: June 27, 2019, 02:27:21 AM »



Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #824 on: June 28, 2019, 04:13:17 AM »

A postcard showing jazz trumpeter Henry Busse.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Busse


As you can see, this postcard was never used.


Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #825 on: June 28, 2019, 05:04:53 AM »

Yet a third Sweden House Smorgasbord restaurant, where you can find gracious dinning without extravagance.  This postcard however, doesn't say that you can have all the food that you care to eat, like the other two did.  The food isn't too easy to see, but I think there might be a cooked turkey sitting up at the far right, but I'll need K_Dubb to back me up on it.  (The other two Sweden House postcards are on the previous page.)   



That sure looks like a turkey to me, too, Rix, under the heat lamp, though it appears to be sitting up on its haunches.  And in the background more of those giant, frilly flapjacks on stands.  I haven't the slightest what they are, but I kind of want to make them.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #826 on: June 28, 2019, 05:47:54 AM »
That sure looks like a turkey to me, too, Rix, under the heat lamp, though it appears to be sitting up on its haunches.  And in the background more of those giant, frilly flapjacks on stands.  I haven't the slightest what they are, but I kind of want to make them.

After the flapjacks are done, you wash them down with an ice cold glass of milk in your Sweden House glass.


Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #827 on: June 28, 2019, 11:51:18 AM »
After the flapjacks are done, you wash them down with an ice cold glass of milk in your Sweden House glass.



Damn, that is foxy!  Ebay, here I come.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #828 on: June 28, 2019, 12:12:15 PM »

A postcard showing jazz trumpeter Henry Busse.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Busse


As you can see, this postcard was never used.



I like the postcard- but the music video was even more interesting. Think MTV would play it if I sent in a request?

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #829 on: June 28, 2019, 05:57:05 PM »
After the flapjacks are done, you wash them down with an ice cold glass of milk in your Sweden House glass.


What kind of establishment was this place at the Florida branch? Wowsers. Some sexy braided Valkyrie in lingerie on a cocktail glass? Talk about all you can eat for a blue plate special. Looks like those Scandi retirees got randy once they left the bitterly cold Midwest? Or did the mob get a hold of some of the franchises in the area?

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #830 on: June 29, 2019, 02:16:29 AM »

Pardon my lack of Emily Post, but why would a diner need three spoons and two forks?


https://odonnellsmarket.com/history-about/

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #831 on: June 29, 2019, 02:34:24 AM »

Pardon my lack of Emily Post, but why would a diner need three spoons and two forks?


https://odonnellsmarket.com/history-about/

I don't have a good answer, Rix, but I'm sure that after a long talk with the cheerful fellow in the red vest I could come up with one.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #832 on: July 03, 2019, 01:59:50 AM »
I don't have a good answer, Rix, but I'm sure that after a long talk with the cheerful fellow in the red vest I could come up with one.
The guy in the vest is definitely the jovial type.  The waiter, not so much.  I think he's an escaped Nazi prison camp guard from WWII.


Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #834 on: July 03, 2019, 12:34:37 PM »

http://www.polyticks.com/elva/The_Elva_Letters/Oleana.html



Now that is more like it!  We could easily be in the Archipelago sometime mid-century with that water view and aggressive mix of traditional and very modern design.  The ladies in their kerchiefs are the crowning touch, with the meatballs front and center in gleaming copper.  I never considered using those three-legged coffee pots as a gravy boat, but I guess it works.

I loved the reminiscences from the owner and the sense of what it must have been like to run such a cool old place.  She may not have been born there but her tone, where everything is the result of hard work and dedication which you just know washes over oceans of heartache and grief and desperation to wrap up "just nice" is ekte Norsk.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #835 on: July 03, 2019, 02:21:11 PM »
Now that is more like it!  We could easily be in the Archipelago sometime mid-century with that water view and aggressive mix of traditional and very modern design.  The ladies in their kerchiefs are the crowning touch, with the meatballs front and center in gleaming copper.  I never considered using those three-legged coffee pots as a gravy boat, but I guess it works.

I loved the reminiscences from the owner and the sense of what it must have been like to run such a cool old place.  She may not have been born there but her tone, where everything is the result of hard work and dedication which you just know washes over oceans of heartache and grief and desperation to wrap up "just nice" is ekte Norsk.

Yes, I thought you would like that one, K.  haha.  I liked how when they expanded, they always built closer and closer to the water.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #836 on: July 03, 2019, 02:47:36 PM »

Pardon my lack of Emily Post, but why would a diner need three spoons and two forks?


https://odonnellsmarket.com/history-about/
Maybe for various courses/items? Like chowder, shellfish, crab, lobster, etc all of which often have specialized utensils to eat properly?

Apparently they are still around but now have moved out to Potomac. Next time I'm up the region I will check it out since I know lots of people who live in the Potomac area. 

https://odonnellsmarket.com/history-about/

"
One of the longest-surviving and best-known seafood restaurants in the city was O'Donnell's. Thomas A. O’Donnell (1890-1949), a native Washingtonian, founded the restaurant, at 1207 E Street NW, in 1922. In 1940, he added O’Donnell’s Sea Grill at 1221 E Street NW, just up the street from his original place, which remained in business. Tom's wife Mildred (1890-1973) decided to branch out to the suburbs in 1956, opening a new restaurant in Bethesda, Maryland. The downtown Sea Grill closed in 1980, and the Bethesda location closed in 2001. The family opened yet another restaurant in Gaithersburg, Maryland, in 1997, and that location continued until 2013."

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #837 on: July 03, 2019, 02:50:10 PM »
Now that is more like it!  We could easily be in the Archipelago sometime mid-century with that water view and aggressive mix of traditional and very modern design.  The ladies in their kerchiefs are the crowning touch, with the meatballs front and center in gleaming copper.  I never considered using those three-legged coffee pots as a gravy boat, but I guess it works.

I loved the reminiscences from the owner and the sense of what it must have been like to run such a cool old place.  She may not have been born there but her tone, where everything is the result of hard work and dedication which you just know washes over oceans of heartache and grief and desperation to wrap up "just nice" is ekte Norsk.
I'm coming also!  She can also bring some of the herring to BellGab Sardinefest 2020! 

"Swedish Meatballs, Inlagd Sill (pickled herring in sour cream) Fish and Clam chowder, Lobster Stew, and my dear friend Hjordis Parker’s Swedish Pancakes with Lingonberries"

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #838 on: July 03, 2019, 03:28:36 PM »
I'm coming also!  She can also bring some of the herring to BellGab Sardinefest 2020! 

"Swedish Meatballs, Inlagd Sill (pickled herring in sour cream) Fish and Clam chowder, Lobster Stew, and my dear friend Hjordis Parker’s Swedish Pancakes with Lingonberries"

It has always puzzled me that pancakes should be ranked so highly in our cuisine.  There is nothing to them:  the lingonberries come in a jar, and the pancakes (more like thick crepes to Americans) are so basic that consulting a recipe, let alone citing one, is laughable.  Just thin flour and eggs with whatever liquid you have on hand (milk, cream, brandy -- I've even used water) until it is runny enough to cover the bottom of a frying pan, and fry in butter.

It would be hard to top Sardinefest 2019 -- Rix's complementary libations were beyond potent, you were a beast at the Halling, and my ode in praise of the noble cod was met with only a few sniggers -- but Mrs. Corliss's sursild might just do it.


Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #839 on: July 03, 2019, 06:05:14 PM »
It has always puzzled me that pancakes should be ranked so highly in our cuisine.  There is nothing to them:  the lingonberries come in a jar, and the pancakes (more like thick crepes to Americans) are so basic that consulting a recipe, let alone citing one, is laughable.  Just thin flour and eggs with whatever liquid you have on hand (milk, cream, brandy -- I've even used water) until it is runny enough to cover the bottom of a frying pan, and fry in butter.

It would be hard to top Sardinefest 2019 -- Rix's complementary libations were beyond potent, you were a beast at the Halling, and my ode in praise of the noble cod was met with only a few sniggers -- but Mrs. Corliss's sursild might just do it.


Because they are so good! Simple doesn't mean it doesn't taste good. And not all of us are expert cooks and what looks simple, to you, might not be.

Takk, it was a wild time!  BellGab Sardinefest 2020 will even be better!  I hope Rix still brings that good akevitt and Lakka*

* and i hope frequent talkshow caller Bill from Madison shows up to help explain his Finnish theories and how the Finnish word for cloudberry got its name, per Wiki:
"The Finnish name for the cloudberry fruit is believed to have originated in the Middle Ages, where a local farmer discovered a man with a dark complexion and disturbing teeth lying near the fruit. When the sleeping man woke up he started speaking in imcomprihensible tongues, saying things about "clouds" and "magical sprays". The man then bolted away into the woods screaming "Lakka", presumably his name. Thus the fruit next to the man was named."