Author Topic: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.  (Read 24716 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #750 on: March 03, 2019, 01:08:58 AM »

Here is a look at the exterior of the Ox Yoke Inn restaurant.  The interior, and information on the place can be found earlier in this thread: http://bellgab.com/index.php?topic=9768.msg1300204#msg1300204


Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #751 on: March 06, 2019, 01:39:58 AM »

Here is your chance to collect a $100.00 a month disability check for just one cent a day. 


 

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #752 on: March 07, 2019, 01:17:17 AM »

Now here's something you don't see every day.  A pounding surf birthday greeting postcard.



Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #753 on: March 08, 2019, 01:32:22 AM »




Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #754 on: March 09, 2019, 02:07:01 AM »

Here is another postcard showing the long gone Kapok Tree Inn Restaurant.  For an earlier view and some history behind the place, click here: http://bellgab.com/index.php?topic=9768.msg1286436#msg1286436


Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #755 on: March 09, 2019, 02:23:55 AM »

Here is another postcard showing the long gone Kapok Tree Inn Restaurant.  For an earlier view and some history behind the place, click here: http://bellgab.com/index.php?topic=9768.msg1286436#msg1286436



Funny to think those suspended fluorescents were probably the latest stylish thing at the time.  Still like the garden patio look, though.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #756 on: March 09, 2019, 02:52:54 AM »
Funny to think those suspended fluorescents were probably the latest stylish thing at the time.  Still like the garden patio look, though.

Haha, I almost feel like we could have bought some plant food there.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #757 on: March 09, 2019, 03:04:26 AM »
Haha, I almost feel like we could have bought some plant food there.

You know, you are right!  Upon closer examination those are not lighting fixtures; they are hanging planter boxes.  What a trip.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #758 on: March 10, 2019, 04:37:31 AM »



No longer a Holiday Inn, or a restaurant.  It appears to be an urgent care facility now.  https://www.commercialcafe.com/commercial-property/us/tx/amarillo/northwest-urgent-care-northeast/   

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #759 on: March 11, 2019, 02:46:28 AM »



Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #760 on: March 12, 2019, 02:15:52 AM »





Good luck in deciphering this message.  It's written in French.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #761 on: March 14, 2019, 01:37:01 AM »



Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #762 on: March 16, 2019, 12:55:24 AM »




Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #763 on: March 16, 2019, 03:35:28 AM »





Good luck in deciphering this message.  It's written in French.

As best as I can make out (high school was a long time ago):

"Dear Hattie,
Your pretty card received a big thank-you.  I recommenced sending you the same series because I posted the others here.  You will forgive me well. 
Your lover,
Phydime"

The last word I can't make out.  Maybe it's the English "hun" used as a term of endearment pre-WWI?  I assume he is French and she is English from the names and English postcard.  Maybe a real-life entente cordiale.

If he means a series of cards, perhaps we can imagine related images that tell a story with couplets beneath that make up a whole poem?

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #764 on: March 16, 2019, 03:31:48 PM »
As best as I can make out (high school was a long time ago):

"Dear Hattie,
Your pretty card received a big thank-you.  I recommenced sending you the same series because I posted the others here.  You will forgive me well. 
Your lover,
Phydime"

The last word I can't make out.  Maybe it's the English "hun" used as a term of endearment pre-WWI?  I assume he is French and she is English from the names and English postcard.  Maybe a real-life entente cordiale.

If he means a series of cards, perhaps we can imagine related images that tell a story with couplets beneath that make up a whole poem?

Thank you so much, K!  I think it is a series of postcards, put to a flowing poem of some sort, as you suggest.  The man and woman were most likely actors, or models, hired for the expressed purpose of 'acting out' a series of photographs that tell a story, or in this case, a poem.  I purchased two postcards just last week that show another couple acting out scenes from two entirely different stories.  (I could easily recognize that they were wearing the same clothes, and were posing along the same flowery path.)  The postcard photographers would hire the models and have them act out several different love stories at one sitting, so to speak.  More bang for their buck, that way.  haha  It appears there was never any stamp on the back of the postcard.  No date, of course, but american military men in France, during WWI, could send postcards over to the states without having to use stamps.  I doubt that free postage would have applied to a French soldier though.  Perhaps an American soldier who was fluent in French?     

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #765 on: March 16, 2019, 04:16:06 PM »
Thank you so much, K!  I think it is a series of postcards, put to a flowing poem of some sort, as you suggest.  The man and woman were most likely actors, or models, hired for the expressed purpose of 'acting out' a series of photographs that tell a story, or in this case, a poem.  I purchased two postcards just last week that show another couple acting out scenes from two entirely different stories.  (I could easily recognize that they were wearing the same clothes, and were posing along the same flowery path.)  The postcard photographers would hire the models and have them act out several different love stories at one sitting, so to speak.  More bang for their buck, that way.  haha  It appears there was never any stamp on the back of the postcard.  No date, of course, but american military men in France, during WWI, could send postcards over to the states without having to use stamps.  I doubt that free postage would have applied to a French soldier though.  Perhaps an American soldier who was fluent in French?     

The date looks to be Oct. 28th '09 to me and Phydime is a French name.  I'd guess it's actually a pre-war Frenchman writing to his English-speaking wife, given her last name.  Unless Hattie is an unusual French name.  There were these fads for English-sounding nicknames as proper names, at least in Norway -- I know a Jonny and a Willy born there -- but that was in the '40s.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #766 on: March 16, 2019, 05:38:01 PM »
The date looks to be Oct. 28th '09 to me and Phydime is a French name.  I'd guess it's actually a pre-war Frenchman writing to his English-speaking wife, given her last name.  Unless Hattie is an unusual French name.  There were these fads for English-sounding nicknames as proper names, at least in Norway -- I know a Jonny and a Willy born there -- but that was in the '40s.

Oh yes, there is a date there.  I had missed it, thanks for pointing that out.  Interestingly, October 28, 1909 was the day that the city of Eatonville, Washington, was incorporated.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #767 on: March 17, 2019, 04:39:55 AM »

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #768 on: March 17, 2019, 11:18:04 AM »


Goodness, that's quite a pipe!  I wonder what she is smoking -- probably some vile old-school rope or twist.  I used to have a bunch of those long white clay ones but I busted them pretty fast.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #769 on: March 17, 2019, 04:01:28 PM »
Goodness, that's quite a pipe!  I wonder what she is smoking -- probably some vile old-school rope or twist.  I used to have a bunch of those long white clay ones but I busted them pretty fast.

I'm intrigued, K.  Were your clay pipes broken while cleaning them, accidentally dropping them, or through the simple act of smoking them, i.e. they got too hot?  Also, on the subject of pipes, have you ever had a stem made from Redmanol? http://bellgab.com/index.php?topic=9331.msg1318036#msg1318036    A most interesting sounding, synthetic material to incorporate into a pipe.  (A close cousin to the early day plastic called Bakelite.)   https://rebornpipes.com/tag/redmanol-pipe/     

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #770 on: March 17, 2019, 05:09:05 PM »
I'm intrigued, K.  Were your clay pipes broken while cleaning them, accidentally dropping them, or through the simple act of smoking them, i.e. they got too hot?  Also, on the subject of pipes, have you ever had a stem made from Redmanol? http://bellgab.com/index.php?topic=9331.msg1318036#msg1318036    A most interesting sounding, synthetic material to incorporate into a pipe.  (A close cousin to the early day plastic called Bakelite.)   https://rebornpipes.com/tag/redmanol-pipe/     

Oh that is what that is!  I had never heard of it, but I do have a beautiful old elegant, pencil-thin straight KB&B with a dark red translucent stem like that, too early to be acrylic, that I've always wondered about.  Thank you, Rix; you have put my mind at ease.  To smoke, it feels smooth like acrylic but not so clattery on your teeth.  Perhaps a little more give.  I wonder what horrible chemicals are in it.

The best stems I have to smoke are a set of old pre-war deadstock German pipes with horn stems I got off ebay.  They are (or were) cheap pipes -- the briar feels quite light and porous -- but feel very organic and natural.  Pretty, too.  Some people say you can taste the animal, but maybe after 70 years it dissipates hahaha.  I regret using them for those soapy (but potent) floral English tobaccos (Condor, St. Bruno, and those Gawith Hoggarth freaks that smell like a French whore) because I don't smoke those that often.

Aside from one tragic incident where I broke five black clays knocking over a tray of them, I've lost most of those clay pipes through gradual attrition, dropping them.  Never broke while smoking.  I love beautiful old things but have come to understand that I can't have them unless they're very durable -- I'm awfully careless and absent-minded about stuff.





Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #771 on: March 18, 2019, 04:58:39 AM »
Here the red color is nearly impossible to see unless you hold it up to a really bright light:



I like those really old mouthpieces that are just barely shaped, like chewing on a pencil.  The new huge ones drive me crazy.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #772 on: March 19, 2019, 03:28:15 AM »
Here the red color is nearly impossible to see unless you hold it up to a really bright light:



I like those really old mouthpieces that are just barely shaped, like chewing on a pencil.  The new huge ones drive me crazy.

My goodness, K, you are right. That is definitely a Redmanol stem there.  My limited research has revealed that Redmanol was developed as an artificial amber, though more durable than amber.  Yet when I think of amber, I picture a lighter, goldish shade of color.  I wonder if your red colored stem could be a rarity.  You might have something of real value on your hands.  I would love to have a pipe like that.     

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #773 on: March 19, 2019, 03:44:42 AM »
My goodness, K, that has to be a Redmanol stem there.  My limited research has revealed that Redmanol was developed as an artificial amber, though more durable than amber.  Yet when I think of amber, I picture a lighter, goldish shade of color.  I wonder if your red colored stem could be a rarity.  You might have something of real value on your hands.  I would love to have a pipe like that.     

Well amber does come in dark red like that, at least if you believe Russian jewelry salesmen hawking suspicious cartloads of the stuff.  But I wonder if, like catalin, it darkens with age and may have originally been golden as you say.  I have heard that beautiful old catalin commonly called "butterscotch" seen in radios, desk accessories, jewelry etc. is supposed to have been ivoryish, originally, but there's nobody around to vouch for it.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #774 on: March 19, 2019, 04:09:22 AM »
Well amber does come in dark red like that, at least if you believe Russian jewelry salesmen hawking suspicious cartloads of the stuff.  But I wonder if, like catalin, it darkens with age and may have originally been golden as you say.  I have heard that beautiful old catalin commonly called "butterscotch" seen in radios, desk accessories, jewelry etc. is supposed to have been ivoryish, originally, but there's nobody around to vouch for it.

I remember some glowing instrument panel lights in my grandfather's 49' Hudson.  They were bright yellow, most likely Bakelite.  He would bundle us kids up at night and drive to a roadside ice cream shop that served marvelous chocolate sundaes covered with ground peanuts and topped with a cherry.  The memory of those hypnotic, instrument panel lights are what made me remember going to that place.  That, plus the name of the dairy shop was Swamp Water.  Ha, you could actually order a soda drink called Swamp Water.   

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #775 on: March 19, 2019, 04:40:12 AM »
I remember some glowing instrument panel lights in my grandfather's 49' Hudson.  They were bright yellow, most likely Bakelite.  He would bundle us kids up at night and drive to a roadside ice cream shop that served marvelous chocolate sundaes covered with ground peanuts and topped with a cherry.  The memory of those hypnotic, instrument panel lights are what made me remember going to that place.  That, plus the name of the dairy shop was Swamp Water.  Ha, you could actually order a soda drink called Swamp Water.

Well there is eyewitness testimony!  And a very evocative memory.  Can't ask for better than that.  Much indebted to you for the identification, too.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #776 on: March 19, 2019, 04:50:48 AM »
Well there is eyewitness testimony!  And a very evocative memory.  Can't ask for better than that.  Much indebted to you for the identification, too.

I am very glad to have been of help, K. 

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #777 on: March 20, 2019, 01:48:16 AM »



Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #778 on: March 25, 2019, 02:04:04 AM »

Here is another look at the slanted roof of Aunt Hattie's restaurant.  Here is an earlier postcard of the place: http://bellgab.com/index.php?topic=9768.msg1126237#msg1126237



Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #779 on: March 29, 2019, 01:36:28 AM »