Author Topic: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.  (Read 14440 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #240 on: February 12, 2018, 07:12:49 PM »
A typical glamour style postcard.  It was never used as a postcard so there is no date on it.  I did locate a reference to the name 'Plastichrome' on the back.  I guess it's a style of photo printing that was first developed back in 1939 and is still being used to this day.  Still don't know how old it is but it has kind of a fifties vibe, to me anyway.


front


back

 

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #241 on: February 15, 2018, 07:07:59 PM »
Here we have the Bowling Green Lodges and Restaurant postcard.  Bowling Green, Vermont, that is, not Kentucky.  Oddly enough there is currently a Bowling Green Lodge restaurant in Kentucky but not in Vermont.  This postcard actually has a listing in Wiki:
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bowling_Green_Lodges_and_Restaurant,_Route_301_--_10_Miles_South,_Bowling_Green,_Virginia_(90696).jpg  Info indicates that the postcard was printed sometime between 1930 and 1945.  Hard to say really because if we look at the postmark on the back, we will see the date January 7, 1960. 

I had no luck in finding info on the restaurant's owners, Mr. and Mrs. Noah G. Teates, other than where their final resting spots are.  Noah Grove Teates and his wife Edna are buried together in Grace United Methodist Church Cemetery in Somerville, Fauquier County, Virginia.

It would have been a funky place to have stopped for lodgings and eats.


Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #242 on: February 17, 2018, 04:39:09 PM »
Here is the beautiful Hotel De Soto (or DeSoto) in Savanah, Georgia.  It looks to be quite a grand old place and I am happy to report that it is still there, and still a hotel, at that.  I didn't find much info on the history of the hotel but I did read that it has been renovated a couple of times.  The Hotel Desoto has its own website but my anti-virus program keeps trying to block it.

That WTOC at the top of the building is still in existence too.  It is a television station (it was a radio station in earlier days, note the kilocycles notation on the sign) and they have their own website: http://www.wtoc.com/


front

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #243 on: February 17, 2018, 06:41:39 PM »
Here is the beautiful Hotel De Soto (or DeSoto) in Savanah, Georgia.  It looks to be quite a grand old place and I am happy to report that it is still there, and still a hotel, at that.  I didn't find much info on the history of the hotel but I did read that it has been renovated a couple of times.  The Hotel Desoto has its own website but my anti-virus program keeps trying to block it.

That WTOC at the top of the building is still in existence too.  It is a television station (it was a radio station in earlier days, note the kilocycles notation on the sign) and they have their own website: http://www.wtoc.com/


front
Site worked for me. Doesn't seem like I got a virus or bot? Hotel and area looks nice. It is operated by Sotherly that operates several hotels, some of which are old/historic, in the South, mainly.
http://sotherlyhotels.com/



Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #244 on: February 19, 2018, 09:19:28 PM »
I like this vintage (somewhat vintage I guess, 1972) restaurant postcard because it shows two interior scenes, the dining room and the lounge of Cal's Restaurant in Sequim, Washington, up around Seattle, I think.  That's Cal in the bottom pic, playing a rollicking tune on his Flamenco guitar.  No, not really, but wait.  It could be Cal because there is absolutely no way of proving that it isn't him.  Yup, sad to say, there appears to be no trace whatsoever of either Cal or his restaurant.  I went through a bunch of Sequim restaurants, but no Cal's.  No detailed address on the card either, so I couldn't run a Google road check on the place to see if it had been turned into another eatery. 

But my time wasn't wasted because I came across a really cool place while looking for Cal's... The John Wayne Marina in Sequim Bay.  Yes, THAT John Wayne.  He had a big yacht called the Wild Goose and he actually boated around the area.  The marina itself wasn't built until after the actor's death.  Cool looking place.  It even has a restaurant.
https://portofpa.com/186/John-Wayne-Marina

I like how Jean noted on the bottom of the postcard that "This card is just an ad card."  I wonder what she meant by saying that she would be starting some round robins from July 1st to the 15th?


front


back




   

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #245 on: February 21, 2018, 06:50:07 PM »
Here is a real-photo postcard of Paul Gottlieb at Camp Gordon on September 30, 1918.  I wonder if he was stationed stateside for the duration of WWI?  September 30th doesn't give him much time to make it to France, though quite a few soldiers were en route across the ocean when the armistice was signed.  I had no luck in finding any info about the guy.


front

 

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #246 on: February 21, 2018, 07:14:26 PM »
Historic Long Beach, CA.



Now itís the home of the Long Beach Grand Prix. Notice the building with the green roof in both pics.



Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #247 on: February 24, 2018, 07:27:59 PM »
Historic Long Beach, CA.



Now itís the home of the Long Beach Grand Prix. Notice the building with the green roof in both pics.



Cool before and after pics there, Gd.  Thanks.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #248 on: February 24, 2018, 07:44:19 PM »
I acquired two unused postcards showing the Miyako Japanese Restaurant that was located at 20 West 56th Street, New York.  It's not there anymore but there is a Miyako Sushi bar located elsewhere in New York.  The building at 20 West looks nothing like the one in the postcards.  There used to be an elevated stairway on the postcard images but none on the modern day facing of the building as shown below.  There is only a 'stamp only' printing on the first postcard so I didn't copy the back of it.  Postcard #2 has some slight info on the back, so I have included it.


postcard 1


postcard 2 - front


postcard 2 - back
 

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #249 on: February 26, 2018, 04:09:43 PM »
Here is a 'greetings, we miss you' kind of postcard.  I have seen a number of these, all with a short 'miss you' note and the name of a town. I can only make out the month of January on the post mark, but that stamp is a one cent Washington that was printed between 1912 and 1914.  Note the numeral 1 on the stamp.  Before this stamp design came into use, the entire words 'one cent' were printed on the stamps.  The printed word stamps are probably more valuable then the numeral ones, because they are older.  This particular stamp has a used value of 25 cents.  Unused ones with gum still on the back go for $9.25.


front


back

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #250 on: February 26, 2018, 04:18:25 PM »
Here is a 'greetings, we miss you' kind of postcard.  I have seen a number of these, all with a short 'miss you' note and the name of a town. I can only make out the month of January on the post mark, but that stamp is a one cent Washington that was printed between 1912 and 1914.  Note the numeral 1 on the stamp.  Before this stamp design came into use, the entire words 'one cent' were printed on the stamps.  The printed word stamps are probably more valuable then the numeral ones, because they are older.  This particular stamp has a used value of 25 cents.  Unused ones with gum still on the back go for $9.25.


front


back
I hope Charles got out of town prior to the 1919 Tornado!

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #251 on: February 26, 2018, 04:32:46 PM »
I hope Charles got out of town prior to the 1919 Tornado!


Now that is one nasty swath of tornado there.  Typically, there are some untouched houses in the distance.  Hopefully one of them was Charle's.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #252 on: February 26, 2018, 08:06:28 PM »
...  The printed word stamps are probably more valuable then the numeral ones, because they are older...

Nope, supply and demand.  Normally the number of stamps issued and still in existence determines the value of each particular issue, unless for some reason a certain one is more desirable than usual, or less.

Then there's condition, used vs unused, still on cover or snipped off, etc, etc.


Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #253 on: February 27, 2018, 01:20:52 AM »
Nope, supply and demand.  Normally the number of stamps issued and still in existence determines the value of each particular issue, unless for some reason a certain one is more desirable than usual, or less.

Then there's condition, used vs unused, still on cover or snipped off, etc, etc.

Absolutely, stamp values can also increase when flaws (even small ones) occur in the printing process.  Also, the design of certain stamps can raise their value.  There is an Andrew Jackson stamp from the 1860s where his portrait takes up most of the stamp.  Collectors call it the 'big head' stamp and they go from $60 to $100 used.  When I look at overall stamp values decade by decade, it seems like older stamps command more price, and in this case the printed word stamps, as example 'one cent' or 'one dollar' are definitely worth more than the later 1910 -1914 stamps that were printed with the actual number of cents and dollars.  As you rightfully point out, there are many different factors that give a stamp it's value.  We are both right because older stamps tend to be more scarce, and thus they become more valuable.           

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #254 on: February 27, 2018, 08:28:43 PM »
Here is a battle scene from an Austrian postcard, or Razglednica, as the Germans call them.  It is titled 'Down With The Russians.'  I've no idea what is written on the back, but there is a date there...February 26, 1918.  I found this while going through items at the Europeana Collection.


Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #255 on: February 27, 2018, 08:46:37 PM »
Here is a battle scene from an Austrian postcard, or Razglednica, as the Germans call them.  It is titled 'Down With The Russians.'  I've no idea what is written on the back, but there is a date there...February 26, 1918.  I found this while going through items at the Europeana Collection.
Interestingly Austria apparently was the first country to invent the postcard. I believe that card is in Croatian, as is the word for postcard you used "Razglednica." Which makes some sense because at that time some of Croatia was a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire back then. In German a postcard is...."Postkarte."

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #256 on: February 27, 2018, 10:18:11 PM »
Interestingly Austria apparently was the first country to invent the postcard. I believe that card is in Croatian, as is the word for postcard you used "Razglednica." Which makes some sense because at that time some of Croatia was a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire back then. In German a postcard is...."Postkarte."

Yes, Postkarte is German for postcard, it even 'sounds' German, haha.  Whereas Razglednica sounds Croatian.  I should have noticed the difference.  Could the battle depiction be from an earlier war?  I know the Austrians took on the Italians in WWI, but the Russians?   

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #257 on: February 27, 2018, 11:05:11 PM »
Yes, Postkarte is German for postcard, it even 'sounds' German, haha.  Whereas Razglednica sounds Croatian.  I should have noticed the difference.  Could the battle depiction be from an earlier war?  I know the Austrians took on the Italians in WWI, but the Russians?

You're familiar with ''the Western Front'' in WWI.  The Eastern Front was Russia and Romania against Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, and the Ottoman Turks.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #258 on: February 28, 2018, 12:16:10 AM »
You're familiar with ''the Western Front'' in WWI.  The Eastern Front was Russia and Romania against Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, and the Ottoman Turks.

Thanks, PB!

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #259 on: March 02, 2018, 02:33:19 PM »
At first glance, you would think that this vintage restaurant postcard of Henri's shows a nice, indoor setting in which families could enjoy a nice lunch or dinner together.  But you would only be half right.  If you look at the top of Henri's colorful neon sign, it says 'Dining Room' and then to the right, 'Car Service.'  That's right, the place was actually a combination restaurant, car hop / drive-in that lots of Terre Haute, Indiana youth had fond memories of visiting while 'tooling' (or cruising) their autos on a Friday or Saturday night.  The actual drive-in section of the restaurant can't be seen in this postcard but it is just to the left of the upper right photo on the postcard.  Here is another postcard I located online that shows the car hop section: https://i.pinimg.com/originals/a2/ec/2b/a2ec2b80e83b312efea026ceb97e7ee4.jpg

Henri's opened on October 26, 1960, and was owned by a guy named Henry Adelman: (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/30992086/henry-i-adelman

I don't know how long the place was in business but it might be some type of furniture store, now.  (Bottom pic.) 


front


back 

     

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #260 on: March 02, 2018, 04:04:15 PM »
At first glance, you would think that this vintage restaurant postcard of Henri's shows a nice, indoor setting in which families could enjoy a nice lunch or dinner together.  But you would only be half right.  If you look at the top of Henri's colorful neon sign, it says 'Dining Room' and then to the right, 'Car Service.'  That's right, the place was actually a combination restaurant, car hop / drive-in that lots of Terre Haute, Indiana youth had fond memories of visiting while 'tooling' (or cruising) their autos on a Friday or Saturday night.  The actual drive-in section of the restaurant can't be seen in this postcard but it is just to the left of the upper right photo on the postcard.  Here is another postcard I located online that shows the car hop section: https://i.pinimg.com/originals/a2/ec/2b/a2ec2b80e83b312efea026ceb97e7ee4.jpg

Henri's opened on October 26, 1960, and was owned by a guy named Henry Adelman: (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/30992086/henry-i-adelman

I don't know how long the place was in business but it might be some type of furniture store, now.  (Bottom pic.) 


front


back 

     

Love those old neon signs. Throw back to a time when your street signage was everything.


Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #261 on: March 02, 2018, 05:52:53 PM »
Love those old neon signs. Throw back to a time when your street signage was everything.

Me too!  I remember as a kid seeing a neon sign for a burger joint.  Paul's Hamburgers I think it was called, as in Paul Bunyan, who was actually standing there, all covered in neon.  His arm came up as if he were chomping on a burger. To me, he looked more like Frankenstein's Monster and I loved to look at him as we zipped by in our auto.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #262 on: March 02, 2018, 06:01:30 PM »
Me too!  I remember as a kid seeing a neon sign for a burger joint.  Paul's Hamburgers I think it was called, as in Paul Bunyan, who was actually standing there, all covered in neon.  His arm came up as if he were chomping on a burger. To me, he looked more like Frankenstein's Monster and I loved to look at him as we zipped by in our auto.

The original in-and-out burger

http://www.spokesman.com/blogs/hbo/2016/dec/09/back-story-paul-bunyan-burger/

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #263 on: March 02, 2018, 06:15:53 PM »
The original in-and-out burger

http://www.spokesman.com/blogs/hbo/2016/dec/09/back-story-paul-bunyan-burger/

Wow, that is cool but the one I saw was at a busy street in Eugene, Oregon, and not quite as big as that one in Idaho.  Still, that one would be neat to see, especially if it still has functioning neon.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #264 on: March 02, 2018, 06:26:51 PM »
Speaking of neon signs, here is a postcard I found online showing a street in Eugene, Or. probably back in the 1940's.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #265 on: March 02, 2018, 07:00:34 PM »
The original in-and-out burger

http://www.spokesman.com/blogs/hbo/2016/dec/09/back-story-paul-bunyan-burger/
Paladin, or anyone in the great Inland Empire, has to do a drive-by and update us if that place still open? And if so a review on the burger.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #266 on: March 03, 2018, 01:41:59 PM »
Here is another postcard from the Europeana Collection showing a soldier working on the hair of a comrade.  It is dated March 2, 1918 and is titled "Photographic postcard in Sermoise with Camille Veyri cutting the hair of one of his comrades."  I thought that was going to be it as far as info on Mr. Veyri goes, but I located one other item of interest on the guy.  It turns out (not surprisingly) that Camille Veyri was the 'hairdresser in the 20th Company.'  This chunk of information seems to be from some type of photo / letter auction, though they were not reproduced.  Reference is made though, to the very pic that has been posted here.

Quote
We have two distinct characters. Gabriel Chaumel, 9th Battalion drum, is part of Mrs. Veyri's family. And Camille Veyri, hairdresser in the 20th Company, is part of the family of Mr. Veyri.
Document 1 and 2: Two-sided handwritten letter of April 16, 1916 by Gabriel Chaumel to his grandmother Document 3 and 4: Two-sided photographic postcard of February 15, 1918, where we see Camille Veyri (first person left) hairdresser by profession, performing his duties on one of his classmates Document 5: Photograph of the regiment to which Camille Veyri belonged (2nd row, 2nd person on the right) Document 6 and 7: Double-sided a photographic postcard of March 2, 1918 in Sermoise, where we see Camille Veyri (right) cut the hair of one of his comrades.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #267 on: March 03, 2018, 02:32:19 PM »


The Lake Tahoe Railway that was used from 1899-1943. Went from Truckee to the Tahoe Wharf. There are still reminants of it.





The last is from this photographer who has stunning photos of the lake.

https://www.bradscottvisuals.com/single-post/2016/11/18/10-Pictures-of-Lake-Tahoe-that-will-Inspire-your-next-trip

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #268 on: March 03, 2018, 04:28:05 PM »


The Lake Tahoe Railway that was used from 1899-1943. Went from Truckee to the Tahoe Wharf. There are still reminants of it.





The last is from this photographer who has stunning photos of the lake.

https://www.bradscottvisuals.com/single-post/2016/11/18/10-Pictures-of-Lake-Tahoe-that-will-Inspire-your-next-trip

Nice train and tracks.  That bottom pic is way cool.

Re: Post Your Favorite Postcards Here.
« Reply #269 on: March 03, 2018, 04:38:32 PM »
Nice train and tracks.  That bottom pic is way cool.
I was wondering if the lake level rose or why they would have tracks into the water. Apparently IT WAS a boat launch for the world's fastest boat the "Mercury."
http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=23085