Author Topic: One Hundred Years Ago  (Read 398901 times)

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One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7230 on: September 20, 2019, 03:20:54 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Rock Island Argus., September 20, 1919.


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7231 on: September 20, 2019, 03:44:50 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Rock Island Argus., September 20, 1919.



I know somebody who actually spent the night on a compete stranger couch. He got to what he (in his inebriated state) believed to be his front door. It was unlocked, so he let himself in and crashed on the sofa only to wake up to a very upset house owner in the morning; and, presumably a hell of a hangover as he attempted to explain the circumstances that lead to his being there...

I will also note that they appear to have found one way to avoid the homeless problem that presently plagues some cities.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7232 on: September 21, 2019, 02:36:04 AM »
I know somebody who actually spent the night on a compete stranger couch. He got to what he (in his inebriated state) believed to be his front door. It was unlocked, so he let himself in and crashed on the sofa only to wake up to a very upset house owner in the morning; and, presumably a hell of a hangover as he attempted to explain the circumstances that lead to his being there...

I will also note that they appear to have found one way to avoid the homeless problem that presently plagues some cities.

I recall seeing a 100 year old clipping from a town I once lived in.  The police rounded up all the vagrants that had come in by train and gave them a choice.  Room and board plus food if they pulled weeds all day, or back on the train, to the next town.


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7233 on: September 21, 2019, 02:31:37 PM »
And so it begins.WWI is at an end. The rebuilding starts, and the fires set to light the world ablaze in WWII are already smouldering.



One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7234 on: September 22, 2019, 02:50:54 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Rock Island Argus., September 22, 1919.




One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7235 on: September 22, 2019, 11:53:06 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Rock Island Argus., September 22, 1919.




People were tougher back then? Or less plaintiff attorneys encouraging the "bruises and scratches" to be life-altering damage in need to large settlements? 

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7236 on: September 25, 2019, 03:24:19 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Rock Island Argus., September 25, 1919.



One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7237 on: September 25, 2019, 11:33:07 PM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Rock Island Argus., September 25, 1919.




This is my paternal grandfather and he denies having anything to do with the missing togs:

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7238 on: October 01, 2019, 02:36:44 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, October 1, 1919.


Quote
General Henry Rawlinson, GOC the North Russia Relief Force Expedition, decorating men of the Naval Flotilla on the quay at Murmansk, shortly before the British withdrawal, 1 October 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205213345

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7239 on: October 01, 2019, 03:14:21 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Rock Island Argus., October 01, 1919.

           


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7240 on: October 02, 2019, 03:13:49 AM »

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7241 on: October 03, 2019, 03:30:17 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Seattle Star., October 03, 1919.


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7242 on: October 06, 2019, 03:57:21 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Rock Island Argus., October 06, 1919.







One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7243 on: October 06, 2019, 10:49:59 PM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Rock Island Argus., October 01, 1919.



I wonder if Steven King considered making "Christine" a freight elevator?  ;)






One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7244 on: October 06, 2019, 10:52:34 PM »
I wonder if Steven King considered making "Christine" a freight elevator?  ;)

Yeah, man. No one suspects...the freight elevator!


One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7245 on: October 06, 2019, 11:12:44 PM »

I wonder if Steven King considered making "Christine" a freight elevator?  ;)






I seem to recall some B-Movie or a part of a serial show about a killer elevator? And some about trapped in a elevator, especially as a partial subject in 'disaster' movies that were popular sometimes.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7246 on: October 07, 2019, 12:02:45 AM »
It was an escalator in the oft-forgotten "Dave vs. The Hawaiian Studio" from the mid-naught-thousands.  Delivered victims to a volcano to appease Late Night Rating Radio Gods.  Think it was a D-movie according to Rotten Tomatos...

-p

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7247 on: October 07, 2019, 12:07:49 AM »
It was an escalator in the oft-forgotten "Dave vs. The Hawaiian Studio" from the mid-naught-thousands.  Delivered victims to a volcano to appease Late Night Rating Radio Gods.  Think it was a D-movie according to Rotten Tomatos...

-p

Hmmm...if one of the freight elevatorís murder victims was Snoorge this movie could be a hit. Letís do lunch, babe. 8)

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7248 on: October 07, 2019, 03:23:09 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Rock Island Argus, October 7, 1919.

(Yet another killer elevator.)

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7249 on: October 08, 2019, 12:30:45 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Rock Island Argus, October 7, 1919.

(Yet another killer elevator.)


I sort of joke about it... But a hundred years ago, elevators were not the devices packed full of safety devices that they are today.  Even today, they have a tendency to kill a few people each year when the safety devices fail or are overridden (or people do something stupid like try to crawl out of an elevator "stuck" between floors.)

The picture that I chose above was from a news story saying that there were 60 elevators in NYC that needed to be inspected after a guy was killed by one. They were a Canadian brand that I had never heard of (as opposed to Tyson or the likes.)

Again, there were, at that time, actual elevator operators employed to keep people safe. I can only imagine that freight elevators used by the average person- who, in 1920 likely considered the horseless carriage to be "new fandangled" gadget most likely caused a number of premature, grisly deaths.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7250 on: October 08, 2019, 03:20:33 AM »
I sort of joke about it... But a hundred years ago, elevators were not the devices packed full of safety devices that they are today.  Even today, they have a tendency to kill a few people each year when the safety devices fail or are overridden (or people do something stupid like try to crawl out of an elevator "stuck" between floors.)

The picture that I chose above was from a news story saying that there were 60 elevators in NYC that needed to be inspected after a guy was killed by one. They were a Canadian brand that I had never heard of (as opposed to Tyson or the likes.)

Again, there were, at that time, actual elevator operators employed to keep people safe. I can only imagine that freight elevators used by the average person- who, in 1920 likely considered the horseless carriage to be "new fandangled" gadget most likely caused a number of premature, grisly deaths.

I still can't quite understand how the motorcycle deliveryman met his end because the coroner's jury said that he was crushed between the elevator and a wall.  I picture walls being on the side of an elevator., not above or below.  The only way I can picture it is that the poor guy was in a hurry to deliver a message and he rushed into the open elevator, only to find out that it was below him.  He landed atop it as it went to the very top of the building where he was crushed up against the rafters, or a ceiling, but certainly not a wall.  IDK.  Guess I might be splitting hairs, here.     

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7251 on: October 08, 2019, 03:32:27 AM »

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7252 on: October 08, 2019, 04:08:20 AM »
I still can't quite understand how the motorcycle deliveryman met his end because the coroner's jury said that he was crushed between the elevator and a wall.  I picture walls being on the side of an elevator., not above or below.  The only way I can picture it is that the poor guy was in a hurry to deliver a message and he rushed into the open elevator, only to find out that it was below him.  He landed atop it as it went to the very top of the building where he was crushed up against the rafters, or a ceiling, but certainly not a wall.  IDK.  Guess I might be splitting hairs, here.   

I had considered that... And it went back to the safety devices that would have been absent. If you think of a freight elevator of 100 years ago, you would likely have a "door" that you pulled closed that would stay on that floor, and a door that would go up with you making a "cage" out of the elevator box. If you did not pull closed that inside door and you slipped or leaned against the wall, you would, essentially end up trapped against the floor of the moving elevator and the ledge of the top of the outside door.

To make it more visual, I went looking for a picture, but found this video. If you start watching at :35 seconds, you will see the outside door close. The inside cage closes at :45. This is a retrofit elevator that will not move without that grate being closed. But imagine you did not need to close it. Now imagine slipping towards the stationary metal door / wall while the elevator was moving and what would happen when the floor kept moving and your body wedged against the metal door...

That would be my best guess. Without that inside cage door being closed, I think you would risk a pretty ugly death as the elevator cable kept pulling with a few thousand pounds of force... At 2:20 you get a bit of an idea when the elevator moves a few feet with the inside cage partially ajar. Imagine this in a warehouse instead of a university- where clearances might not be as tight 100 years ago and before there were safety devices added (even this elevator moved with that door not fully closed...)





One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7253 on: October 08, 2019, 04:24:53 AM »
From the Euopeana Collection.


Airship Bodensee lands in Stockholm on 8 Oct. 1919.
https://www.europeana.eu/portal/en/record/916118/S_TEK_photo_TEKA0096884.html?utm_source=api&utm_medium=api&utm_campaign=api2demo  (Public Domain https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/)

History of the Bodensee: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeppelin_LZ_120_Bodensee

I will admit that I always thought of those early beasts as slow, lumbering, heavy craft. 132 KMPH top speed?!? I'm impressed.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7254 on: October 08, 2019, 09:32:21 AM »
From the Euopeana Collection.


Airship Bodensee lands in Stockholm on 8 Oct. 1919.
https://www.europeana.eu/portal/en/record/916118/S_TEK_photo_TEKA0096884.html?utm_source=api&utm_medium=api&utm_campaign=api2demo  (Public Domain https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/)

History of the Bodensee: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeppelin_LZ_120_Bodensee

That is an awesome picture!  Also, the crew (?) are wearing tricornes with all appearance of sobriety -- I thought they only showed up at Karneval.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7255 on: October 08, 2019, 09:41:15 AM »
Well!  Seems like they were the regular army uniform.



Those crazy Swedes.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7256 on: October 09, 2019, 03:02:17 AM »
I had considered that... And it went back to the safety devices that would have been absent. If you think of a freight elevator of 100 years ago, you would likely have a "door" that you pulled closed that would stay on that floor, and a door that would go up with you making a "cage" out of the elevator box. If you did not pull closed that inside door and you slipped or leaned against the wall, you would, essentially end up trapped against the floor of the moving elevator and the ledge of the top of the outside door.

To make it more visual, I went looking for a picture, but found this video. If you start watching at :35 seconds, you will see the outside door close. The inside cage closes at :45. This is a retrofit elevator that will not move without that grate being closed. But imagine you did not need to close it. Now imagine slipping towards the stationary metal door / wall while the elevator was moving and what would happen when the floor kept moving and your body wedged against the metal door...

That would be my best guess. Without that inside cage door being closed, I think you would risk a pretty ugly death as the elevator cable kept pulling with a few thousand pounds of force... At 2:20 you get a bit of an idea when the elevator moves a few feet with the inside cage partially ajar. Imagine this in a warehouse instead of a university- where clearances might not be as tight 100 years ago and before there were safety devices added (even this elevator moved with that door not fully closed...)



Thanks, WOTR.  My mind plays tricks on me while watching the elevator.  My brain tells me that it is the building behind the door that is going up and down, rather than the elevator.  I guess I'd be easy prey for The Killer Elevator.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7257 on: October 09, 2019, 03:18:52 AM »
That is an awesome picture!  Also, the crew (?) are wearing tricornes with all appearance of sobriety -- I thought they only showed up at Karneval.

Did you notice that big bag under the front end of the airship?  I wonder if it was an early day shock absorber of some type, used to soften landings?  You can also see the bag in that link, where it shows a couple photos of the airship sailing by.

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7258 on: October 09, 2019, 03:19:17 AM »
Well!  Seems like they were the regular army uniform.



Those crazy Swedes.

Crazy perhaps, but smart enough to stay out of WWI & II.   

One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #7259 on: October 09, 2019, 03:26:39 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Rock Island Argus., October 09, 1919.