Author Topic: One Hundred Years Ago  (Read 333986 times)

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Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6600 on: June 08, 2018, 03:30:51 AM »
From the Library of Congress, June 8, 1918.


The Tonopah Daily Bonanza.

SHERIFF THOMAS LANDS WITNESS NEAR AUSTIN AFTER WEEK'S HUNT

  Jimmy Darrough, the Indian trailer, was on the stand this morning for cross examination regarding statements made about the footprints leading from McWilliams' mine. The witness remained unshaken although he was given a severe grilling.

  Chester Perrine, a white man, who was with Jimmy, was called to the stand at 11:50 this morning and was cross examined. He corroborated everything the trailer had narrated.

  Mr. Berg was also recalled without learning anything new.

  Mrs. John Harrington testified that she passed the Kruger cabin late in the afternoon of the day when McWilliams was killed and had heard pounding inside the home. This was taken by the state to show that the prisoner was engaged altering his shoes worn earlier in the day to avoid identification.

  Sheriff Thomas reported by telegraph from Austin that he had found Richard Hogshed, the missing witness, called by the state, who had gone out on a prospecting trip and for whom the sheriff had been searching for a week.

EIGHT DEATHS AND FOUR BIRTHS IN MAY    

  Dr. C. L. Richards, registrar of vital statistics, completed his report for May this morning with the following results:

Deaths

John McWilliams, 60, homicide, Round Mountain; Joseph Simons, 46, tuberculosis, Round Mountain; both died in March.

Susan Jane Kelly, 58, Manhattan, senility.

Wm. C. Loherty, 45. Manhattan, pneumonla.

Demey Anderson (Indian), 15, tuberculosis, Belmont.

Thomas J. Rooney, 49, uremic poisoning, Tonopah.

James P. Gardner, 38, pneumonia, Tonopah.

Minnie J. Trout, 45, heart failure, Tonopah.

Pete Raduly, 22, pneumonia, Tonopah.

George Noddin, 66, tuberculosis, Tonopah.


Births

Sons to James A. McLaughlin and Lawrence L. Shaw of Tonopah; and Oscar J. Smith of lone. Daughter, to Nick Chlatovich of Tonopah.


FALLS UNDER TRAIN AND LOSES HAND

  To lose his right hand by falling under a train was the fate of C. W. Pugh when he tried to board Southern Pacific train No. 20 Thursday night after it had started, says the Gazette.

  According to the story told by a companion, he and Pugh left the train at the depot to go to buy a bottle of beer. They stayed too long and when they arrived at the station again the train had started up. They were forced to climb on it or miss it altogether. The other man got on safely and then Pugh started to climb on the same step before the other was well out of the way. He slipped and fell under the wheels and onlookers thought him ground to pieces.


The Seattle Star.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6601 on: June 08, 2018, 10:54:22 PM »
A total solar eclipse occurred back on June 8, 1918.

Info:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_eclipse_of_June_8,_1918

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6602 on: June 09, 2018, 02:54:53 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 9, 1918.



Quote
Wounded horses being led on to barges for transport to a Veterinary hospital. Canal de l'Aa, Saint-Omer, 9 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244702 © IWM (Q 8908)


Quote
Wounded horses being led on board a Veterinary Hospital Barge. Note Nissen Huts on bank. Canal de l'Aa, Saint-Omer, 9 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244700 © IWM (Q 8906)


Quote
Royal Engineers fishing from a barge at Watten, 9 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244690 © IWM (Q 8896)


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6603 on: June 10, 2018, 03:03:56 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 10, 1918.



Quote
The ruined church and some ruined houses in Rue de l'Eglise at Coullemelle, 10 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205308778 © IWM (Q 61322)


R.I.P.


Quote
Second Lieutenant Robert Seddon Caldwell Croix de Guerre with Palm. Unit: 8th Cyclist Battalion, Army Cyclist Corps. Death: 10 June 1918 Killed in action Western Front. Son of Mrs. A. A. Greensmith, of Brookfield, Westhoughton, Lancs.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205291699 © IWM (HU 119472)


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6604 on: June 10, 2018, 03:51:25 AM »
Actor Barry Morse was born on June 10, 1918.  He was perhaps best known as playing Lt. Philip Gerard, the police detective who spent four years trying to hunt down convicted killer Dr. Richard Kimble (David Janssen) on the television series The Fugitive.  He acted in over a thousand rolls in movies, television shows and plays.  My personal favorite was Barry's roll in the televised miniseries The Martian Chronicles, where he played a wizened old robot maker named Peter Hathaway, who had been left on Mars when almost everyone else had returned to Earth.  He created a family of robots to keep him company and he also wired up a complete city down in a valley, with lights and recorded sounds so that it would appear that there was still a settlement on Mars.

Biography of Barry Morse: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barry_Morse

Info on The Fugitive: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fugitive_(TV_series)

Info on the television miniseries The Martian Chronicles: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Martian_Chronicles_(miniseries)


Barry Morse as Lieutenant Gerard in the pilot episode of The Fugitive, 1963.
By WBKB-TV, which was the owned and operated ABC television station in Chicago. Some years later, the station changed its call letters to WLS-TV. - eBay item photo front photo back, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18353619


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6605 on: June 11, 2018, 02:27:06 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 11, 1918.



Quote
Indian drivers watering some horses in a shallow stream near Pas whilst an English sergeant watches them, 11 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205088457 © IWM (Q 8916)


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An Indian gunner-groom with the well tended horse of which he is in charge. Near Pas, 11 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205088442 © IWM (Q 8912)


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A ruined street in Amiens, 11 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247044 © IWM (Q 11446)


R.I.P.


Quote
Son of the late G. H. Doman, B.A., M.B., B.C. Cantab., and Mrs. G. H. Doman, of Westhoughton, Lancs. On 21 March 1918, during the German assault, he was wounded in both legs and taken prisoner. Lieutenant Doman died of his wounds, aged 21, while being held prisoner on 11 June 1918. He is buried at Poznań Garrison Cemetery.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205023744 © IWM (HU 93392)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6606 on: June 11, 2018, 03:09:50 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, June 11, 1918.


STATE RESTS CASE AGAINST KRUGER

  At 11:30 this morning the state closed its case in the trial of Kruger on the indictment for having murdered McWilliams at Round Mountain and the defense took up the defendant's side with a request that a subpoena be issued for Mrs. Howard Melvin of Round Mountain, who had been called as a witness for the state and then excused on account of her young baby.

  This morning was spent chiefly in corroborating evidence. Tex Carden and other witnesses were recalled.

  Chris Johnson, of the Lothrop-Davis company, who, had been examined yesterday as an expert on the make of rifles and ammunition took the stand again today to explain the different sizes of shells.

  The first witnessed placed on the stand this afternoon by the defense was a son of Kruger, who testified as to the whereabouts of his father and his movements on the day of the killing. It was understood that the defendant would be allowed to testify in his own behalf.





Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6607 on: June 11, 2018, 03:27:13 AM »
Ruth Aarons, Table Tennis champion, Vaudeville performer, and talent manager to the likes of Jack Cassidy, Shirley Jones, David Cassidy, Shaun Cassidy, Susan Dey, George Chakiris, Janis Paige, Claire Richardson, and Celeste Holm, (just to mention a few) was born on June 11, 1918.

Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruth_Aarons


Publicity shot of Ruth Aarons as the 1936 World Women's Singles Championship for "Time" Magazine.
United States Table Tennis Association

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6608 on: June 12, 2018, 03:14:36 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 12, 1918.



Quote
Troops of the 24th Motor Machine Gun Battalion mounting a gun in preparation for inspection by General Henry Horne, the Commander of the First Army, at Dieval, 12 June 1918. The motorbikes are Clyno 744 cc twin cylinder machines fitted with a sidecar and Vickers machine-guns.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246031 © IWM (Q 10328)


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General Henry Horne, the Commander of the First Army, inspecting the 24th Motor Machine Gun Battalion at Dieval, 12 June 1918. The motorbikes are Clyno 744 cc twin cylinder machines fitted with a sidecar and Vickers machine-guns.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205091291 © IWM (Q 10325)


Quote
General Henry Horne, the Commander of the First Army, inspecting the 24th Motor Machine Gun Battalion at Dieval, 12 June 1918. The motorbikes are Clyno 744 cc twin cylinder machines fitted with a sidecar and Vickers machine-guns.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246027 © IWM (Q 10323)


Quote
A French Saint Chamond tank, possibly of the 34th Tank Regiment, going up to the line near Moyenneville (Oise), 12 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205282978 © IWM (Q 49097)


R.I.P.


Quote
Acting Sergeant John Joseph Herlihy Murphy 1761. Unit: 2nd Australian Pioneer Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Death: 12 June 1918 Western Front. Son of John and Catherine Murphy, of 54, Grosvenor St., East St. Kilda, Victoria, Australia. Native of Melbourne.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205386304 © IWM (HU 126049)
 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6609 on: June 12, 2018, 03:57:50 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, June 12, 1918.


KRUGER GUILTY IN SECOND DEGREE

  Betting on a disagreement in the Kruger case was the favorite play around the courthouse this afternoon when the jury which went out last night at 11:30 had failed to reach a verdict. At noon today the jury came in to ask about instructions regarding some of the testimony of the Indian trailers and at 2 o'clock retired once more. At 3:45 the jury brought in a verdict of guilty of murder in the second degree.


BURGLAR BREAKS LOCK ON DOOR OF T. & G. MARKET

  Some time last night the retail store of the United Cattle and Packing company was entered and $10 taken from the cash register. The thief must have been in a hurry for he was so nervous that he dropped his watch which was picked off the floor this morning. The timepiece was identified by Shemanski as one that was taken from his store yesterday by a man who left it to be repaired.

 
FIRE IN A LAUNDRY
 
  At 3:15 this afternoon the fire department was called to a Chinese laundry back of the Hall Liquor company. The damage was slight.


CURLY MONROE FOUND DEAD IN GOLDFIELD - BELIEVED TO HAVE SMOTHERED TO DEATH UNDER INFLUNENCE OF NARCOTICS

  The body of Curly Monroe, a young man who recently sang in the Exchange theater, was found early this morning in a hollow on the west side of First street, between Hall and Miner, says the Goldfield Tribune. The body was lying face down and it is supposed that Monroe, in an intoxicated condition or almost helpless from the use of drugs, fell on his face, burying it in sand, and smothered to death.

  His wife, Mrs. Alice Monroe, now in Ely, has been notified of the death.

  Curley Monroe played an engagement at the Butler theater last month, but never was a resident, of Tonopah. At one time he was recognized as a leading soloist and played the Orpheum circuit regularly until dissipation ruined him.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6610 on: June 12, 2018, 02:29:44 PM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, June 12, 1918.


CURLY MONROE FOUND DEAD IN GOLDFIELD - BELIEVED TO HAVE SMOTHERED TO DEATH UNDER INFLUNENCE OF NARCOTICS

  The body of Curly Monroe, a young man who recently sang in the Exchange theater, was found early this morning in a hollow on the west side of First street, between Hall and Miner, says the Goldfield Tribune. The body was lying face down and it is supposed that Monroe, in an intoxicated condition or almost helpless from the use of drugs, fell on his face, burying it in sand, and smothered to death.

  His wife, Mrs. Alice Monroe, now in Ely, has been notified of the death.

  Curley Monroe played an engagement at the Butler theater last month, but never was a resident, of Tonopah. At one time he was recognized as a leading soloist and played the Orpheum circuit regularly until dissipation ruined him.

Things haven't changed a bit in the past 100 years.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6611 on: June 12, 2018, 02:48:12 PM »
Things haven't changed a bit in the past 100 years.

Ha, I know.  Too bad the above mentioned burglar's name wasn't engraved on the back of the dropped watch.  Would have fit right in with today's 'stupid things that criminals do.'

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6612 on: June 13, 2018, 02:39:49 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 13, 1918.



Quote
Traffic control man calling car driver's attention to notice ordering slow driving to avoid raising dust which draws shell fire. Angres, 13 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238615 © IWM (Q 6718)


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A gas sentry of the 20th Division in the ruins of Lievin, 13 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238597 © IWM (Q 6699)


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Ruins in Arras with the cathedral visible in the background. 13 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238627 © IWM (Q 6731)


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The German Spring Offensive. Notice in the ruins of Arras Cathedral stating that the French authorities intend to preserve them as a historic feature and war memorial and forbidding the removal of material or interference with the site. 13 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239690 © IWM (Q 7895)


R.I.P.


Quote
Sergeant Harry Lovell Fynmore 26395. Unit: 7th Battalion, Australian Infantry, Australian Imperial Force. Death: 13 June 1918, Western Front. Son of Frank and Henrietta Fynmore, of 85, Darling Street, Moonee Ponds, Victoria, Australia.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205295176 © IWM (HU 122503)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6613 on: June 13, 2018, 03:43:24 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, June 13, 1918.


MALICIOUS MISCHIEF

  Chief of police Jack Grant is looking for the miscreant who threw a huge boulder through the rear door of the power company's office about 11 o'clock last night. One of the office employees sleeps in the rear of the building and heard the projectile land on the floor, but did not get up to investigate. No reason is assigned for the attack.


JAKE GETS A WARNING

  Jake Levens, better known as "Socialist Jake," was arrested yesterday by Chief of Police Grant for driving his team down Main street at break-neck speed and whipping his horses. Jake appeared before Justice Dunseath this morning and was sentenced to 60 days in jail. The court then suspended sentence on promise of good behavior.


IMPOSTOR CLAIMS WAR HONORS

  After successfully posing as a discharged British army officer for several weeks, Frederick James Stephenson, who was arrested three weeks ago by federal officers, was fined $50 in the Justice court yesterday for obtaining dental services under false pretenses. Reno Gazette.


KRUGER WILL BE SENTENCED

  Judge Averlll will pass sentence on H. R. Kruger Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock.


MAY CLOSE PLACES OF ILL-FAME IN RENO

  The establishment of a military cantonment at the university will force the closing of all places of ill-fame within a radius of five miles of the university, according to the opinion of federal officials who have looked into the matter.

  "The law states that no saloon can be conducted within half a mile of a military cantonment or training camp and no place of ill-fame can be maintained within five miles of such a camp." said United States Attorney Woodburn in discussing the subject this morning.

  The military training camp at the university will open on Saturday for the training of 100 men for two months.


FIRE ALMOST BURNS BLIND ALTURAS WOMAN

  Because she was blind and did not know that her house was on fire, Mrs. Williams of Alturas narrowly escaped death by cremation Tuesday afternoon, when her home in that city burned down. Mrs. Williams was led from the burning house by a neighbor, who realized her plight and guided her to safety before Mrs. Williams knew that she was in danger. The fire was caused by lightning.


TEN DOLLARS REWARD

   Any one giving information leading to the conviction of the party or parities guilty of throwing a huge rock through the rear door of the Power company's office last night will receive  a reward of $10.
JOHN D. GRANT,

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6614 on: June 13, 2018, 04:02:19 AM »
Western Actor Ben Johnson was born on June 13, 1918. 

Biography: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0424565/bio


Ben Johnson in The Wild Bunch publicity photo.
By Unknown - eBay item, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=26481111

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6615 on: June 13, 2018, 12:56:17 PM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, June 13, 1918.


MALICIOUS MISCHIEF

  Chief of police Jack Grant is looking for the miscreant who threw a huge boulder through the rear door of the power company's office about 11 o'clock last night. One of the office employees sleeps in the rear of the building and heard the projectile land on the floor, but did not get up to investigate. No reason is assigned for the attack.


JAKE GETS A WARNING

  Jake Levens, better known as "Socialist Jake," was arrested yesterday by Chief of Police Grant for driving his team down Main street at break-neck speed and whipping his horses. Jake appeared before Justice Dunseath this morning and was sentenced to 60 days in jail. The court then suspended sentence on promise of good behavior.


IMPOSTOR CLAIMS WAR HONORS

  After successfully posing as a discharged British army officer for several weeks, Frederick James Stephenson, who was arrested three weeks ago by federal officers, was fined $50 in the Justice court yesterday for obtaining dental services under false pretenses. Reno Gazette.


KRUGER WILL BE SENTENCED

  Judge Averlll will pass sentence on H. R. Kruger Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock.


MAY CLOSE PLACES OF ILL-FAME IN RENO

  The establishment of a military cantonment at the university will force the closing of all places of ill-fame within a radius of five miles of the university, according to the opinion of federal officials who have looked into the matter.

  "The law states that no saloon can be conducted within half a mile of a military cantonment or training camp and no place of ill-fame can be maintained within five miles of such a camp." said United States Attorney Woodburn in discussing the subject this morning.

  The military training camp at the university will open on Saturday for the training of 100 men for two months.


FIRE ALMOST BURNS BLIND ALTURAS WOMAN

  Because she was blind and did not know that her house was on fire, Mrs. Williams of Alturas narrowly escaped death by cremation Tuesday afternoon, when her home in that city burned down. Mrs. Williams was led from the burning house by a neighbor, who realized her plight and guided her to safety before Mrs. Williams knew that she was in danger. The fire was caused by lightning.


TEN DOLLARS REWARD

   Any one giving information leading to the conviction of the party or parities guilty of throwing a huge rock through the rear door of the Power company's office last night will receive  a reward of $10.
JOHN D. GRANT,
Ha. Nothing changes if you read those stories.

Socialists running amok. Protests against energy companies. Fake war veteran scammers.


Though I like how some bureaucrat figured what the proper distances should be between young male cadets and booze and 'places of ill-repute!'
Couldn't the blind woman hear or smell? Fire caused by lightening? I would imagine some noise and smell?

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6616 on: June 13, 2018, 01:11:44 PM »
Western Actor Ben Johnson was born on June 13, 1918. 

Biography: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0424565/bio


Ben Johnson in The Wild Bunch publicity photo.
By Unknown - eBay item, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=26481111
One of my favorites! Not sure if he really was 'acting' though.  ;) Real cowboy not actor playing cowboy.

"I can't handle phony people, and there are a lot of them in Hollywood. I've built my life around the principles of honesty, realism and respect, and if the people in Hollywood are so pumped up on themselves they can't deal with that, I say the hell with 'em."

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6617 on: June 14, 2018, 02:40:45 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 14, 1918.



Quote
Work of the Royal Engineers. Making strong points in a reserve line at Basseux, 14 June 1918. Showing the scrim-covered windlass, seen in the background of Q 7900, where the excavated spoil is brought to the surface. The camouflage prevents detection of the work from the air.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239695 © IWM (Q 7904)


Quote
Work of the Royal Engineers. Disposal of excavated spoil. Making strong-points in a reserve line at Basseux, 14 June 1918. Troops bringing the earth in trucks from underground in sandbags, which are carried away by an arrangement of wheel-hooks on a rail leading down an inclined plane.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205091975 © IWM (Q 7900)


Quote
Work of the Royal Engineers. Making strong points in a reserve line at Basseux, 14 June 1918. The mono-rail for the disposal of excavated spoil. Its use prevented the making of tracks which would be seen from the air.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239700 © IWM (Q 7909)


Quote
Royal Highlanders resting at the foot of a wall. Arras, 14 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238598 © IWM (Q 6700)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6618 on: June 14, 2018, 03:51:11 AM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6619 on: June 15, 2018, 02:34:57 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 15, 1918.



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The Sport Tournament organised at St. Andre, 15 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238606 © IWM (Q 6708)


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The Sport Tournament organised at St. Andre, 15 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238602 © IWM (Q 6704)


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British troops going on the leave boat at Boulogne, 15 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244741 © IWM (Q 8953)


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Dazzle-camouflaged ship, crowded with troops going for a leave and wearing life jackets, leaves Boulogne for England, 15 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205194038 © IWM (Q 10329)


R.I.P.


Quote
Able Seaman Arthur Henry Thomas Vizard. Unit: Drake Battalion, Royal Naval Division, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Death: 15 June 1918 Gallipoli / Dardanelles. Son of Arthur and Louise Vizard, of 131, Honeywell Rd., Wandsworth Common, London.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205390169 © IWM (HU 125494)



Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6620 on: June 15, 2018, 03:17:34 AM »
From the Library of Congress, June 15, 1918.


The Tonopah Daily Bonanza.


TEN YEARS PRISON FOR H. R. KRUGER

  H. R. Kruger, who was convicted of murdering John McWilliams, was sentenced this afternoon by Judge Averill to a period of not less than ten years up to life imprisonment in the state penitentiary. The prisoner was stolid on receiving sentence and did not move a muscle. He will be taken to Carson City tomorrow morning by Sheriff Thomas, who will also be accompanied by the ten-year-old son. The latter will be turned over to the state orphans' home.


SEVERELY BURNED

  Stanley L'Engle, chauffeur for the Louisiana Consolidated Mining company, is at the Mine Operators' hospital suffering from bad burns on both hands and arms sustained at the mine while he was cleaning up one of the company's cars.

  Stanley has the reputation of being one of the most careful drivers both on the road and around the garage, but in this case he forgot himself and is paying the penalty which is mitigated by the fact that he is the only patient in the hospital with three good looking nurses to wait on him.

  The young man received a slight scratch on one hand which he bound up with a copious bandage to avoid blood poisoning. When he came to cleaning up the machine he was engaged with a gasoline torch which flared back against the bandaged hand and set fire to the wrappings on his hand. As be struggled to subdue the flame the clothing on the other arm also caught fire and Stanley was in grave danger when a fellow employee came to his help and extinguished the blaze.


The Perth Amboy Evening News.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6621 on: June 15, 2018, 06:20:17 AM »
Should we check out the daily racing form ?

https://archive.org/stream/drf1918061501#page/n0/mode/2up



Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6622 on: June 15, 2018, 06:24:23 AM »


The Queenslander Pictorial 15 June 1918.


A weekly pictorial supplement to The Queenslander newspaper,
published each Saturday. The Queenslander was the weekly summary and literary
edition of the 'Brisbane Courier' (now The Courier-Mail), since the 1850s the
leading journal in the colony and later federal state of Queensland. The
Queenslander was launched by the Brisbane Newspaper Company in 1866 and it was
discontinued in 1939.

https://archive.org/details/QueenslanderPictorialSupplementToTheQueenslander15June1918

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6623 on: June 16, 2018, 02:08:58 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 16, 1918.



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A group photograph of pilots of 'A' Flight, No 4 Squadron, Australian Flying Corps, Clairmarais, 16 June 1918. In the background can be seen their Sopwith Camel aircraft.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205127641 © IWM (E(AUS) 2661)


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Royal Engineers covering up stores with camouflage netting at Basseux, 16 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205091947 © IWM (Q 6749)


R.I.P.


Quote
Miss Eva Davies, Voluntary Aid Detachments. Died of septic poisoning contracted on duty 16 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205380189 © IWM (WWC H2-133)


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6624 on: June 16, 2018, 02:13:25 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 16, 1918.


https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205127641 © IWM (E(AUS) 2661)

https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205091947 © IWM (Q 6749)


R.I.P.

https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205380189 © IWM (WWC H2-133)

That picture looks like Justin Trudeau.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6625 on: June 16, 2018, 02:51:38 AM »
That picture looks like Justin Trudeau.



Time slip?

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6626 on: June 16, 2018, 11:51:23 PM »
I decided that this is probably the place to post this as I think there are a number of "old film buffs" here.  I just started downloading “Dawson City: Frozen Time”  It seems to have promise as something quite unique and interesting...  I guess we will see shortly...  :)



Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6627 on: June 17, 2018, 03:48:21 AM »
I decided that this is probably the place to post this as I think there are a number of "old film buffs" here.  I just started downloading “Dawson City: Frozen Time”  It seems to have promise as something quite unique and interesting...  I guess we will see shortly...  :)



Please let us know what you think of it, WOTR.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6628 on: June 17, 2018, 03:57:06 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 17, 1918.



Quote
The commander of No. 22 Squadron talking to the squadron's parrot mascot perched on the propeller of a Bristol Fighter. Serny aerodrome, 17 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247589 © IWM (Q 12048)


Quote
Four Bristol Fighters of No. 22 Squadron leaving Serny aerodrome in formation. The machines on the ground being towed out of the hangars are Sopwith Camels. Photograph taken on 17 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247592 © IWM (Q 12054)


Quote
A Bristol Fighter of No. 22 Squadron "banking". Taken from another machine, Serny aerodrome, 17 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247594 © IWM (Q 12057)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6629 on: June 17, 2018, 04:38:28 AM »
From the Library of Congress, June 17, 1918.


The Tonopah Daily Bonanza.

CLOUDBURST TEARS OUT A ROAD

  Billy Mercer reports that the entire road for a distance of fourteen miles from Kibbey's station to Crow springs, about twelve miles from Millers, was washed away by a cloudburst that broke in that vicinity Saturday afternoon without leaving a vestige of the highway. Mr. Mercer was caught on the other side and had to spend nearly all night shoveling his way. He said it was the biggest job of the kind he ever tackled, but there was no getting away from the fact that he had to unreef a muck stick and go to it man-fashion.

  Billy Mercer had taken an auto run down the road with his wife Saturday noon. Intending to spend the day visiting his wife's parents at Hawthorne and then allow time to stop off at the lake for a little fishing. That he was successful is proven by his appearance at the Central market this morning with a luscious string of trout.


SHEEPHERDER PUTS PEPPER AND SHEEP DIP ON WOUND

  Alexander Gallegos, a sheepherder near Greer post office, about 30 miles from Paradise, one day last week, while pounding a ground hog with the butt of a 25-30 rifle, carrying a soft-nose, steel-jacket bullet, held the business end of the gun in his hand. As usual, the gun was discharged and the man found himself almost minus a thumb and his legs full of particles of steel.
 
 Being alone in the camp, he made shift to do up the wound in sheep dip and pepper, and was not able to reach Winnemucca until yesterday, when Dr. O. U. Hull found his wounds in a bad condition, with a threat of gangrene.

  The wounds were cleaned and dressed and a radiograph will be taken today, when the fragments of the steel bullet will be located and removed. 


ELY BOY INJURED

  Isadore Meyer, son of Mrs. Thomas Meyer, of Central Ely, was painfully injured about the eyes while going about his duties at the coal crushing plant at McGill Sunday night. A water gauge glass exploded and the flying particles of broken glass caught the young man fairly in the face and eyes, inflicting injuries which for a time it was feared would cost him the sight of one eye. Isadore's father, Thomas Meyer, died only a few weeks ago. 


ALVA MILLER SHIPS WALKER LAKE TROUT

  Alva Miller is serious when he says he is going into the fish business and, as proof of his sincerity, he sends the Bonanza a Walker lake trout that tipped the scales at eight pounds. If there are any more of these monsters the citizens of Tonopah should wake up and see that some are placed on sale as they are superior to any salt water fish entering this market. The Walker lake trout is luscious looking with a pink meat resembling the Truckee salmon trout.


The Rogue River Courier

NAVY ACCEPTS GLASSES SENT BY M. T. WIRE

  Rev. Melville T. Wire is quite pleased today over the receipt of a letter from the navy department, accepting a pair of powerful aluminum mounted hunting glasses he sent in recently.

  Mr. Wire is one of a number from Grants Pass who answered the call from the navy department for powerful glasses to use in sighting submarines. The department sent him a check for one dollar, a nominal fee, as the government can not accept gifts.

  Mr. Wire's name will be engraved on the glasses and if they are still available at the end of the war, will be returned to him with a record telling where the glasses were used.

  Mr. Wire not only feels that he is helping the government, but that he will probably have a very interesting souvenir of the war.