Author Topic: One Hundred Years Ago  (Read 334046 times)

0 Members and 4 Guests are viewing this topic.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6570 on: May 30, 2018, 03:52:49 AM »
Frederick Trump died on May 30, 1918.

Info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Trump

Some interesting facts about Frederick Trump:

1.   He was Donald Trump's grandfather.
2.   He was born in Kallstadt, Palatinate, in the Kingdom of Bavaria.
3.   He learned to be a barber and at the age of 16 he emigrated to the United States aboard the steamship Eider.   
4.   U.S. immigration records listed his name as "Friedr. Trumpf"
5.   At the age of 22 he moved to Seattle, Washington and bought the Poodle Restaurant. He changed the name of the
      restaurant to the Dairy restaurant.  It served food, liquor and (supposedly) prostitutes.
6.   He purchased 40 acres of land outside of Seattle. This was the first major real estate purchase of the Trump family.
7.   He took advantage of the Yukon Gold Rush by opening a restaurant and hotel at Bennett, British Columbia.
8.   He moved to New York and married Elisabeth Christ on August 26, 1902.  They had a daughter and named her Elizabeth.
9.   Frederick moved his family to Bavaria but the authorities there claimed that he had immigrated to the U.S. to avoid
      military service.  He had to return with his family to the U.S.
10. He opened a barber shop at 60 Wall Street in Manhattan, New York.  The Trumps had two sons, Fred and John.
11. On May 29, 1918, Frederick fell sick and was diagnosed with pneumonia.  He died the next day because it wasn't
      pneumonia.  He was an early victim of the 1918 flu pandemic.


Portrait of the Trump family, from left to right: Fred, Frederick, Elizabeth, Elizabeth Christ, and John, 1915.
By Unknown - This file was derived from: Friedrich Trump Family.jpg:, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=54234115


 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6571 on: May 31, 2018, 02:27:42 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, May 31, 1918.



Quote
Worn-out and damaged cars, lorries and other vehicles awaiting repair at the Base Mechanical Transport Depot at Rouen, 31 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244644 IWM (Q 8838)


Quote
Workers of the South African Native Labour Corps stacking lorry radiators requiring repair at the Base Mechanical Transport Depot at Rouen, 31 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244640 IWM (Q 8833)


Quote
Base Mechanical Transport Depot at Rouen, 31 May 1918. Soldier testing repaired inner tubes from the lorry tyres.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244630 IWM (Q 8823)


Quote
Troops working on a shell-shattered radiator of the wrecked Daimler lorry at the Base Mechanical Transport Depot at Rouen, 31 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244635 IWM (Q 8828)


Quote
Troops loading spare parts for delivery by lorry at the Base Mechanical Transport Depot at Rouen, 31 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244633 IWM (Q 8826)


Quote
A new lorry from Britain being unshipped at the Base Mechanical Transport Depot at Rouen, 31 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244636 IWM (Q 8829)


R.I.P.


Quote
Captain Duncan Victor Mulholland. Unit: 1st Battalion, Australian Machine Gun Corps, Australian Imperial Force. Death: 31 May 1918, Western Front. Son of James and Gertrude Mulholland. Native of Ashfield, Sydney, New South Wales.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205386254 IWM (HU 109545)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6572 on: May 31, 2018, 03:40:47 AM »
The American  troopship USS President Lincoln was hit with 4 torpedoes from U-boat U-90 on May 31, 1918.  The ship would sink twenty minutes later.  Out of 715 people aboard, 26 men were lost, and one man, Lieutenant Edouard Izac was captured and taken aboard the U-boat.

Info on the USS President Lincoln: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_President_Lincoln_(1907)

Interestingly, one of the books in my WWI library is about Edouard Izac and his efforts to escape from German prison camps.  It is titled appropriately enough, 'Escape.'  I remember reading that he was put on a train and while his guards weren't looking, he kicked a window out and jumped out.  He was caught though, and was severely beaten.  But he didn't give up and he did manage to escape toward the end of October.  He was able to convey some enemy intelligence to his superiors but it wasn't of any value because the war ended a couple weeks later.

Info on Edouard Izac: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edouard_Izac


 


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6573 on: May 31, 2018, 12:37:07 PM »
The American  troopship USS President Lincoln was hit with 4 torpedoes from U-boat U-90 on May 31, 1918.  The ship would sink twenty minutes later.  Out of 715 people aboard, 26 men were lost, and one man, Lieutenant Edouard Izac was captured and taken aboard the U-boat.

Info on the USS President Lincoln: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_President_Lincoln_(1907)

Interestingly, one of the books in my WWI library is about Edouard Izac and his efforts to escape from German prison camps.  It is titled appropriately enough, 'Escape.'  I remember reading that he was put on a train and while his guards weren't looking, he kicked a window out and jumped out.  He was caught though, and was severely beaten.  But he didn't give up and he did manage to escape toward the end of October.  He was able to convey some enemy intelligence to his superiors but it wasn't of any value because the war ended a couple weeks later.

Info on Edouard Izac: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edouard_Izac


 
Interesting story about Izac.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6574 on: June 01, 2018, 02:30:55 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 1, 1918.



Quote
Air mechanics with a large bomb to be carried by a Handley Page Type 0/400 bomber of No. 14 Squadron RNAS. Dunkirk Aerodrome, 1 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247725 IWM (Q 12195)


Quote
Air mechanics of No. 14 Squadron RNAS attaching a 230 lb bomb to a Handley Page Type 0/400 bomber at Dunkirk Aerodrome, 1 June 1918. Note smaller bombs above to the right.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247137 IWM (Q 11551)


Quote
The nose of a Handley Page Type 0/400 bomber of No. 14 Squadron RNAS showing Forward Observer's and Pilot's cockpits. Note a Lewis machine gun on the nose Scarff ring. Dunkirk Aerodrome, 1 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247711 IWM (Q 12181)


Quote
Handley Page Type 0/400 bomber of No. 14 Squadron RNAS preparing to leave Dunkirk Aerodrome, 1 June 1918. The Pilot and Observer making the final tests.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247133 IWM (Q 11547)


Quote
Handley Page Type 0/400 bomber of No. 14 Squadron RNAS in flight over Dunkirk, 1 June 1918. Photograph taken from another bomber flying above it.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247722 IWM (Q 12192)


Quote
Handley Page Type 0/400 bomber of No. 14 Squadron RNAS in flight, taken from the rear gunner cockpit, looking back. Part of the biplane tail can be seen. Flying from from Dunkirk Aerodrome, 1 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247720 IWM (Q 12190)


R.I.P.


Quote
Matron Martha S Farley, Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service Reserve. Died of illness contracted on duty 01 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205380316 IWM (WWC H21-49)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6575 on: June 02, 2018, 02:27:50 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 2, 1918.



Quote
Nurses assessing damage done during air raid on No. 9 Canadian Stationary Hospital, Etaples on 31 May 1918. Photograph taken on 2 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247157 IWM (Q 11572)


Quote
An Italian Obice da 305/17 modello 16 self-propelled heavy howitzer on the road at Sandrigo, 2 June 1918.[/b
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205086224 IWM (Q 69606)


Quote
Horse-drawn mobile lofts for carrier pigeons at the pigeon pens at Sorrus, 2 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244675 IWM (Q 8875)


Quote
Carrier pigeon, which lost a leg, at the pens at Sorrus, 2 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244670 IWM (Q 8867)


Quote
Motorcyclists of the Royal Engineers (Signals) setting out with baskets on their backs, in which are four pigeons to be taken from the lofts at Sorrus to the frontline, 2 June 1918. Note the four compartments in each basket.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205212910 IWM (Q 8879)


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6576 on: June 02, 2018, 03:01:01 AM »
On June 2, 1918, the German submarine SM U-151 sank six ships off the coast of New Jersey.  Nearly all crew and passengers survived the six sinkings except for one lifeboat from the SS Carolina.  It had capsized, causing eight male passengers and five crewmen to drown.

History of the SM U-151:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SM_U-151


By Internet Archive Book Images - https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/14596181448/Source book page: https://archive.org/stream/germansubmarinea00unitrich/germansubmarinea00unitrich#page/n38/mode/1up, No restrictions, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=43911114



 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6577 on: June 02, 2018, 03:21:46 AM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6578 on: June 02, 2018, 03:29:09 AM »


Cool, Rix!!!  ;D I've got a number of Lloyd's shorts and features but not sure I have that one.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6579 on: June 02, 2018, 03:34:23 AM »
Here's a hit film by DeMille from 1918.  Not the usual entertaining hokum one would expect from him. A very downbeat film.

https://archive.org/details/TheWhisperingChorus1918

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6580 on: June 02, 2018, 03:45:43 AM »
Cool, Rix!!!  ;D I've got a number of Lloyd's shorts and features but not sure I have that one.

Glad you liked it.  I was looking for a 1918 video and came across it.  Very good quality for such an old film.  Primitive Lloyd for sure but there are some smart, comedic moves here and there in it.  It comes to a rather quick ending and I wonder if they ran out of money or something?  I couldn't find much information on the short.  Like you, I like a lot of his later stuff. 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6581 on: June 02, 2018, 03:47:09 AM »
Here's a hit film by DeMille from 1918.  Not the usual entertaining hokum one would expect from him. A very downbeat film.

https://archive.org/details/TheWhisperingChorus1918

I'll certainly give it a look see.  Thanks, 21st.  :)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6582 on: June 03, 2018, 02:55:21 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 3, 1918.



Quote
American and French troops examining a wrecked German AEG G.IV heavy bomber (serial number G572) near Catillon, 3 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205312760 IWM (Q 65566)


Quote
Curious result of a German air raid at Abbeville, 3 June 1918. The roof of a house brought down, almost intact to ground level.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244679 IWM (Q 8881)


Quote
French and British soldiers by an overturned lorry on a road near Doullens, 3 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244680 IWM (Q 8882)


R.I.P.


Quote
Sergeant Ernest Dean 307879. Unit: 1st/7th Battalion, Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment). Death: 03 June 1918 Killed in action Western Front. Son of Mr. and Mrs. John Dean.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205293385 IWM (HU 121103)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6583 on: June 03, 2018, 03:45:42 AM »
From the Library of Congress, June 3, 1918.


The Ashland (Oregon) Tidings.

SPY SUSPECT CAUGHT GOING TO PORTLAND

  A German giving his name as Julius Pankaw was arrested at the S. P. depot in Roseburg by Sheriff George Quine last week on arrival of the northbound train and was later placed in charge of a detective aboard the train and sent on through to Portland, where he was turned over to the United States marshal there.

  The man arrested is about 40 years of age, and his suspicious actions attracted the attention of a detective on the train. Shortly after leaving Dole station the fellow  surreptiously threw a handful of torn bits of paper out of the car window, and when accused of endeavoring to dispose of incriminating evidence denied the truth of the statement.

  As he appeared to be pro-German in his tendencies, as well as of German origin, his action looked suspicious, and a wire was sent to Sheriff Quine who met the train and placed the fellow under arrest. Going down the line the sheriff hunted along the tracks until he found the torn bits of paper, and gathered them all up. When examined they appeared to be parts of two letters, one of which was typewritten and references was frequently made to military affairs, "service in the army," "lieutenant" and other words and sentences of a nature that shows the letters were discussing those matters.

  Pankaw was reticent concerning his movements, but it was learned by the sheriff that the fellow has visited Germany since the war broke out in 1914, but has probably been in the United States all of the time since this country entered the struggle.

  The pieces of letters were mailed to the United States marshal at Portland, and after they have been arranged into a readable page the identity of the alleged spy may be ascertained.

  Sheriff Quine later received word that more papers containing plans drawn by the German spy had been found near Round Prairie near where the others were picked up. He said that the papers found this time contain plans of factories for the making of harness and saddles to be used in the army. When searched by the officers at Portland the spy is reported to have had $40,000 on his person.


The Tonopah Daily Bonanza.

ON TRIAL FOR DEATH OF A PROSPECTOR

  At three o'clock this afternoon the jury box was filled for the third time in the case of the State vs. Kruger, indicted for the murder of a prospector named McWilliams at Round Mountain. Neither side has exercised its peremptoriness, but it was believed that by this evening the twelve men would be secured. No objection was advanced to the acceptance of women jurors, but none had been reached, so it is not known if the fair sex is acceptable in a case where the life of a man be at stake.

  The chief question fired at talesmen was whether they would bring in a true verdict in a case where the evidence was purely circumstantial.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6584 on: June 04, 2018, 02:24:04 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 4, 1918.



Quote
A large industrial building beside the railway at Sailly-Labourse set on fire by a German incendiary shell. French civilians are trying to put it out, 4 June 1918. #1
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246692 IWM (Q 11063)


#2
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246691 IWM (Q 11062)


#3
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246688 IWM (Q 11059)


Quote
Waitresses of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps serving American and British officers at the Officers Rest Club. Abbeville, 4 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246693 IWM (Q 11064)


R.I.P.


Quote
Second Lieutenant Francis Emery Burford. Unit: 1st Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment. Death: 04 June 1918 Western Front. Son of Samuel Francis and Clara D'Este Burford, of Leicester.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205291423 IWM (HU 114666)




Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6585 on: June 04, 2018, 03:07:17 AM »
from the Library of Congress, June 4, 1918.


The Rogue River Courier. (Grants Pass, Oregon.)




The Tonopah Daily Bonanza.

RUN OUT OF CAMP BY PATRIOTIC MEN OF THE TYBO MINE

  Carl Mueller, formerly employed at Tybo, is in town looking around for a lawyer to take his case against somebody. Mueller thinks he has been grievously wronged by his late associates among the employees of the Louisiana Consolidated Mining company and would like to have the advice of a lawyer to help him out of the dilemma of vying to recover damages or else have the satisfaction of charging the bunch with assault and battery. Whatever may happen it is safe to venture that Mr. Mueller will not find any attorney willing to assume his case, which is alleged to be one of open and notorious sedition, according to the statements of men from Tybo.

  Mueller is an Austrian who does not hesitate to conceal his profound contempt for everything American and that is how he got in bad at Tybo. The other boys all subscribed one shift's pay to the Red Cross and when it came to Mueller's turn to put down his name he refused point blank, accompanying the refusal with remarks that so incensed the mine force that they went over the top in great shape, landing on Mueller in a dozen places with such rapidity that he was given a good and forcible illustration of a dose of shrapnel. When he emerged from the melee he presented a pair of optics beautifully discolored and also had several other bruises that gave him some physical pain. He did not have much time to deliberate for a committee of the men notified him to make himself scarce by getting out of Tybo as quickly as his legs would permit.

  Mueller landed here last evening and instantly proceeded to the office of a leading attorney, where he failed to find any satisfaction.


JURY IN THE BOX TO TRY HOMICIDE

  A few minutes before noon this morning the jury in the Kruger case was accepted after the attorneys for either side had used only four of their peremptory challenges, although they were entitled to eight. Only two women were called and one of these was accepted, the other, Mrs. Ruby Dewar, being excused on the ground that she is about to leave the city and had all arrangements made. The second taleswoman, Mrs. Blanche Mitchell, proved acceptable.

  The district attorney presented his side, setting forth that the case would depend entirely on circumstantial evidence.

  After lunch, G. M. Cahill and Clarence E. Waldner, for the state, gave testimony.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6586 on: June 04, 2018, 03:28:32 AM »
Johnny Klein was born on June 4, 1918.  He was a drummer for Lawrence Welk and was also Welk's second cousin.

Bio of Johnny Klein: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_Klein




Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6587 on: June 04, 2018, 05:39:20 PM »
from the Library of Congress, June 4, 1918.


The Rogue River Courier. (Grants Pass, Oregon.)




The Tonopah Daily Bonanza.

RUN OUT OF CAMP BY PATRIOTIC MEN OF THE TYBO MINE

  Carl Mueller, formerly employed at Tybo, is in town looking around for a lawyer to take his case against somebody. Mueller thinks he has been grievously wronged by his late associates among the employees of the Louisiana Consolidated Mining company and would like to have the advice of a lawyer to help him out of the dilemma of vying to recover damages or else have the satisfaction of charging the bunch with assault and battery. Whatever may happen it is safe to venture that Mr. Mueller will not find any attorney willing to assume his case, which is alleged to be one of open and notorious sedition, according to the statements of men from Tybo.

  Mueller is an Austrian who does not hesitate to conceal his profound contempt for everything American and that is how he got in bad at Tybo. The other boys all subscribed one shift's pay to the Red Cross and when it came to Mueller's turn to put down his name he refused point blank, accompanying the refusal with remarks that so incensed the mine force that they went over the top in great shape, landing on Mueller in a dozen places with such rapidity that he was given a good and forcible illustration of a dose of shrapnel. When he emerged from the melee he presented a pair of optics beautifully discolored and also had several other bruises that gave him some physical pain. He did not have much time to deliberate for a committee of the men notified him to make himself scarce by getting out of Tybo as quickly as his legs would permit.

  Mueller landed here last evening and instantly proceeded to the office of a leading attorney, where he failed to find any satisfaction.


JURY IN THE BOX TO TRY HOMICIDE

  A few minutes before noon this morning the jury in the Kruger case was accepted after the attorneys for either side had used only four of their peremptory challenges, although they were entitled to eight. Only two women were called and one of these was accepted, the other, Mrs. Ruby Dewar, being excused on the ground that she is about to leave the city and had all arrangements made. The second taleswoman, Mrs. Blanche Mitchell, proved acceptable.

  The district attorney presented his side, setting forth that the case would depend entirely on circumstantial evidence.

  After lunch, G. M. Cahill and Clarence E. Waldner, for the state, gave testimony.
Now days people just use "juror" without an gender but I like the way the old papers wrote and also more information is contained by using this term and more concise (taleswoman vs female juror.)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6588 on: June 05, 2018, 03:08:28 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 5, 1918.



Quote
Troops of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers and the King's Own Scottish Borderers receiving instruction in the operating of a cinema projecting machines before going back to the frontline as operators. Boulogne, 5 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205019074 IWM (Q 8883)


Quote
Soldiers of the Army Service Corps preparing films for use in behind-the-lines cinemas for the troops. Boulogne, 5 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205194036 IWM (Q 8885)


Quote
A 75 mm anti-aircraft gun of "B" Battery, 1st Anti-Aircraft Regiment (American 2nd Division) on a camouflaged motor lorry mounting in action near Montreuil, 5 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205028795 IWM (Q 70236)


R.I.P.


Quote
Private Hubert Edward Grimes 27678. Unit: 7th Battalion, King's Shropshire Light Infantry. Death: 5 June 1918, Western Front. Son of Cornelius Edward and Annie Elizabeth Grimes, of 29, Blenheim Rd., St. John's Wood, London.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205295857 IWM (HU 115494)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6589 on: June 05, 2018, 03:35:26 AM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6590 on: June 05, 2018, 10:03:48 PM »

By Unknown - http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/id?TH-45658, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9956878

I watched a Sherlock Holmes movie called The Woman In Green last night.  It starred the great Basil Rathbone and as I watched, it came to me that Basil was probably the right age to have been involved with World War One.  So after the movie I looked it up and yes, the actor was very much involved in the conflict.  His younger brother John also took part in the fighting.



On June 4, 1918 (100 years ago yesterday) at 1:00 pm, a mental image of his brother entered Basil's mind, causing him to burst into tears.  Later on, Basil learned that his brother had been killed in the war at that exact time and day.

Here is a nice link that covers Basil's experience during the Great War.  It includes some photos of Basil and his brother plus a description of Basil entering No Man's Land disguised as a tree:  http://www.basilrathbone.net/biography/ww1.htm

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6591 on: June 05, 2018, 10:13:14 PM »

By Unknown - http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/id?TH-45658, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9956878

I watched a Sherlock Holmes movie called The Woman In Green last night.  It starred the great Basil Rathbone and as I watched, it came to me that Basil was probably the right age to have been involved with World War One.  So after the movie I looked it up and yes, the actor was very much involved in the conflict.  His younger brother John also took part in the fighting.



On June 4, 1918 (100 years ago yesterday) at 1:00 pm, a mental image of his brother entered Basil's mind, causing him to burst into tears.  Later on, Basil learned that his brother had been killed in the war at that exact time and day.

Here is a nice link that covers Basil's experience during the Great War.  It includes some photos of Basil and his brother plus a description of Basil entering No Man's Land disguised as a tree:  http://www.basilrathbone.net/biography/ww1.htm


Wow. He is Sherlock to me. Cool story, esp considering the lack of trees in much of the battlefields after some time!! Almost comic- dressed as trees, of not for the real sadness of so many dead, usually young, in the war between Cousins! And interesting the psychic wake-up call when his brother died.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6592 on: June 05, 2018, 10:33:13 PM »

Wow. He is Sherlock to me. Cool story, esp considering the lack of trees in much of the battlefields after some time!! Almost comic- dressed as trees, of not for the real sadness of so many dead, usually young, in the war between Cousins! And interesting the psychic wake-up call when his brother died.

He valued friendship too.  I read on his regular Wiki page that he produced a play in later years and his friend Nigel Bruce (the guy who played Dr. Watson) was slatted to star in it.  Bruce sickened though, and died before he could appear in the play.  Rathbone was so saddened that he folded the play after only three performances.  I guess it just wasn't the same without his old friend being on hand to play in it.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6593 on: June 05, 2018, 10:41:07 PM »
He valued friendship too.  I read on his regular Wiki page that he produced a play in later years and his friend Nigel Bruce (the guy who played Dr. Watson) was slatted to star in it.  Bruce sickened though, and died before he could appear in the play.  Rathbone was so saddened that he folded the play after only three performances.  I guess it just wasn't the same without his old friend being on hand to play in it.


Another famous detective, not real, by another great author I learned today had an Obit on front page of NYTimes in 1975. A questioned I missed watching Jeopardy!

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6594 on: June 06, 2018, 03:29:42 AM »
From the Library of Congress, June 6, 1918.


The Tonopah Daily Bonanza.

KRUGER TRIAL WILL OCCUPY THE WEEK

  The Kruger trial brought out no novel features this morning as the prosecution was engaged in coupling up certain preliminaries. Willie Jim, an Indian trailer, said he saw Kruger leave his cabin about 12:30 and had a gun with him. Jimmy Bob, another Indian, deposed that McWilliams was alive at his claim at 12:30, "the time when the whistle blew." Justice Morris testified that the pockets of the dead man were turned inside out as though they had been pulled out in a hurry. Dr. Crane on the stand this afternoon and some of the former witnesses were recalled. The case is expected to occupy the remainder of the week.

DISLOYAL CITIZENS IN MESHES OF THE LAW

  E. C. Dalzell, deputy United States marshal, who has been busy in southern Nevada for the past ten days, returned to Reno this morning with four prisoners and expected to add another to his string when the train reaches Reno. The captives were:

George Pushman, an Austrian, of Las Vegas, accused of using seditious language to the affect that it would have been better had the Kaiser tackled this country first and captured it as it was without any means of defense.

Alley Stennan is an alien enemy from Las Vegas, who is supposed to have been in partnership with a previous prisoner who was found to have maps showing every part of the Clark railroad system with details of the shop construction at Las Vegas.

R. Hansen, an alleged draft evader from Caliente is supposed to be the victim of circumstances, as it was not through any fault of his own that he failed to register.

H. N. Wilder, also from Las Vegas, is charged with being implicated in a white slavery case, wherein his relations were brought out in the testimony in another case in the district court.

Thomas Grace an outlander, who came into Mica from California and indulged in seditious language, will be taken from that town and carried to Carson City.


The Ashland (Oregon) Tidings.


Main Street Bakery Closed For Summer

  Owing to conditions regulating the baking business incident to the cutting down of wheat flour supplies, Abe Butler has closed his bakery on Main street, for the present, at least. The use of substitutes has made his business so much harder, together with the lack of efficient help, that during the summer he concluded to close down. He will hold his room and equipment, so that should conditions prove favorable later on he can resume his business.

Whiskey Runners In Policemen's Toils

  A party of Medford joy riders were arrested in Ashland Sunday night and were fined for bringing liquor from California into the bone dry state. One of the party had plentifully imbibed of the cup that cheers and while he had no liquor in his possession was held on the charge of boisterous conduct and was fined $5. 

  Monday night the same party again were stopped on the mountain by the police, and relieved of 16 pint bottles of whisky which they were carrying in their pockets. A fine of $30 was the result of their pleasure excursion.
 








Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6595 on: June 06, 2018, 04:26:14 PM »
From the Library of Congress, June 6, 1918.


The Tonopah Daily Bonanza.

KRUGER TRIAL WILL OCCUPY THE WEEK

  The Kruger trial brought out no novel features this morning as the prosecution was engaged in coupling up certain preliminaries. Willie Jim, an Indian trailer, said he saw Kruger leave his cabin about 12:30 and had a gun with him. Jimmy Bob, another Indian, deposed that McWilliams was alive at his claim at 12:30, "the time when the whistle blew." Justice Morris testified that the pockets of the dead man were turned inside out as though they had been pulled out in a hurry. Dr. Crane on the stand this afternoon and some of the former witnesses were recalled. The case is expected to occupy the remainder of the week.

DISLOYAL CITIZENS IN MESHES OF THE LAW

  E. C. Dalzell, deputy United States marshal, who has been busy in southern Nevada for the past ten days, returned to Reno this morning with four prisoners and expected to add another to his string when the train reaches Reno. The captives were:

George Pushman, an Austrian, of Las Vegas, accused of using seditious language to the affect that it would have been better had the Kaiser tackled this country first and captured it as it was without any means of defense.

Alley Stennan is an alien enemy from Las Vegas, who is supposed to have been in partnership with a previous prisoner who was found to have maps showing every part of the Clark railroad system with details of the shop construction at Las Vegas.

R. Hansen, an alleged draft evader from Caliente is supposed to be the victim of circumstances, as it was not through any fault of his own that he failed to register.

H. N. Wilder, also from Las Vegas, is charged with being implicated in a white slavery case, wherein his relations were brought out in the testimony in another case in the district court.

Thomas Grace an outlander, who came into Mica from California and indulged in seditious language, will be taken from that town and carried to Carson City.


The Ashland (Oregon) Tidings.


Main Street Bakery Closed For Summer

  Owing to conditions regulating the baking business incident to the cutting down of wheat flour supplies, Abe Butler has closed his bakery on Main street, for the present, at least. The use of substitutes has made his business so much harder, together with the lack of efficient help, that during the summer he concluded to close down. He will hold his room and equipment, so that should conditions prove favorable later on he can resume his business.

Whiskey Runners In Policemen's Toils

  A party of Medford joy riders were arrested in Ashland Sunday night and were fined for bringing liquor from California into the bone dry state. One of the party had plentifully imbibed of the cup that cheers and while he had no liquor in his possession was held on the charge of boisterous conduct and was fined $5. 

  Monday night the same party again were stopped on the mountain by the police, and relieved of 16 pint bottles of whisky which they were carrying in their pockets. A fine of $30 was the result of their pleasure excursion.
I like the charge of "boisterous conduct," we should put that law back on the books. Sounds more fun than "drunk and disorderly" or "public intoxication."  So Oregon was "dry" back then?
Was prostitution illegal back then in Nevada?

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6596 on: June 06, 2018, 06:20:28 PM »
I like the charge of "boisterous conduct," we should put that law back on the books. Sounds more fun than "drunk and disorderly" or "public intoxication."  So Oregon was "dry" back then?
Was prostitution illegal back then in Nevada?

I think that prostitution has been legal in Nevada since 1850, a good fourteen years before it attained statehood.  A number of law enforcement tweaks were made through the years, the latest dealing with child prostitution.  There are a number of counties in the state that prohibit it also, including Clark County i.e. Las Vegas.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostitution_in_Nevada

Those Oregon boys would have to duck the law for another fifteen years until the Twenty-first Amendment was enacted.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6597 on: June 07, 2018, 02:07:37 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 7, 1918.



Quote
Lowering pipes into the river Authie at Auxi that the water may be treated by the depoisoning and sterilizing plant of No. 2 Water Tank Company ASC (attached to the 718th Motor Transport Company, Army Service Corps).
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244685 IWM (Q 8890)


Quote
RAMC personnel of No. 2 Water Tank Company ASC (attached to the 718th Motor Transport Company, Army Service Corps) testing river water which has passed through the sterilising and depoisoning apparatus into a canvas at the roadside for use of troops. Auxi, 7 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244681 IWM (Q 8886)


Quote
Water from the river Authie having passed through the depoisoning and sterilising plant of No. 2 Water Tank Company ASC (attached to the 718th Motor Transport Company, Army Service Corps), enters the canvas tank pure. Auxi, 7 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244684 IWM (Q 8889)
 

Quote
Pure water being pumped into a water cart after treatment by the depoisoning and sterilizing plant of No. 2 Water Tank Company ASC (attached to the 718th Motor Transport Company, Army Service Corps). Auxi, 7 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244686 IWM (Q 8891)


R.I.P.


Quote
Captain Herbert Osborn Cresswell. Unit: Special List. Death: 07 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205292883 IWM (HU 120565)



Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6598 on: June 07, 2018, 03:07:15 AM »
From the Library of Congress, June 7, 1918.


The Tonopah Daily Bonanza.

INDIAM TRAILER TELLS HOW HE PICKED UP TRAIL OF PRISONER

Jimmy Darrough, the keen eyed Indian trailer, was on the stand in the district court this morning as a witness for the state in the Kruger murder case. The witness told how he followed the tracks of Kruger which be picked up in the canyon about 500 feet from where the body of McWilliams was found. After the crime was committed and the community aroused the scene was visited by many townspeople whose foot prints obliterated the original trail leading from the site of the murdered man. The recovery of the tracks and how they were followed back to town furnished an interesting chapter that held the interest of the court attendants. The Indian went on to relate that in following the backward trail he ran into a cross trail going in the opposite direction, which he also traced to the end. Part of the distance was covered by a man wearing rubber shoes which were discarded on completing half the distance to town. Later the witness revisited the scene in company with Undersheriff Schade and accompanied by Kruger when he fitted a pair of the defendant's shoes to the tracks and found they filled the seventeen impressions perfectly. After this, the Indian testified, Kruger put new heels on the shoes and drove nails in the soles to mislead any one who would suspect they had been worn around McWilliams place.

  Con. Dugan testified that he had seen Kruger in a saloon at 4 o'clock on the afternoon. The value of this testimony is due to the fact that the crime was supposed to have been committed some time before 4 o'clock on the fourth of February, as that was the time when the body was found.

  Chester Perrine and Tex Cardan also gave testimony for the prosecution.

  The evidence of Johnny Darrough is considered the strongest part of the case as the Indian is known as a man of almost infallible instinct in following a trail. It was due to his evidence in the haystack arson case against Fagan that the defendant was convicted with nothing more than the links of testimony developed by the Indian to govern the jury.


WILDCAT ATTACKS JOHN G. TAYLOR AND R. BARRY - BITTEN BY SUPPOSED RABID ANIMAL

  John G. Taylor, well-known sheep man, and R. Barry, state sheep inspector, were attacked and wounded by a wildcat, supposed to have been rabid, at the formers shearing pens in Squaw Valley yesterday. From the meager details that can be obtained it seems that the animal sprang on Mr. Taylor's back and bit him on the neck. Mr. Barry, who was nearby, went to Mr. Taylor's assistance and Barry was bitten in the calf of the leg before the animal was finally killed. Both men also received a number of scratches from the vicious animal's claws.

  Messrs. Taylor and Barry lost no time in boarding an automobile in which they drove to Golconda. There they took S. P. No. 19 last evening and went to Reno to receive the Pasteur treatment. The head of the animal will be sent to Reno for examination. In any event Messrs. Taylor and Barry took no chances and will take the full course of treatment. 


OPIUM LAYOUT SEIZED

  Acting under advices from revenue agents officers invaded recently and took possession of one of the finest opium layouts that has been seen in Nevada. The stuff was the property of a nurse who had been employed here for some time.


The Seattle Star.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6599 on: June 08, 2018, 02:14:30 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, June 8, 1918.



Quote
Royal Engineers diver preparing to descend during the course of repairs to a lock gate on the canal at Watten, 8 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246026 IWM (Q 10322)


Quote
Diver of the Royal Engineers descending to repair the foundation of a bridge on the canal at Watten, 8 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244692 IWM (Q 8898)


Quote
Diver of the Royal Engineers descending to repair the foundation of a bridge on the canal at Watten, 8 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244691 IWM (Q 8897)


Quote
Nurses of the QAIMNSR or the TFNS and the RAMC Medical Officers having tea aboard hospital barge. Watten, 8 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244688 IWM (Q 8893)


Quote
Nurses of the QAIMNSR or the TFNS taking part in a fishing contest between the nurses of hospital barges. Watten, 8 June 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244689 IWM (Q 8894)


R.I.P.


Quote
Private/Corporal Edwin Charles Rowe 18226. Unit: The Buffs(East Kent Regiment). Death: 08 June 1918 Western Front.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205388072 IWM (HU 125223)