Author Topic: One Hundred Years Ago  (Read 334006 times)

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Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6480 on: April 30, 2018, 03:56:56 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Seattle Star, April 30, 1918.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6481 on: May 01, 2018, 03:16:32 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, May 1, 1918.


Quote
German soldier pose happily in the barrel of the long range Paris Gun (Paris-Geschütz) which bombarded Paris during the Spring Offensive, 1 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205080601 © IWM (Q 87407)


Quote
The Battle of the Lys (Operation Georgette). A Machine Gun Corps post in a barn near Haverskerque, 1 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205196009 © IWM (Q 6571)


R.I.P.


Quote
Private James A. Heywood 26979. Unit: 1st Battalion, Royal Lancaster Regiment. Death: 1 May 1918, killed in action, Western Front. Son of the late Jonathan and Margaret Heywood; husband of Ethel Heywood, of 61, Bishop St., Beswick, Manchester. Born at Manchester.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205301173 © IWM (HU 123307)


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6482 on: May 01, 2018, 03:43:57 AM »


Josef Damböck

Economist's son from Schlupfling, Lower Bavaria, Germany.

Driver in the 1st Reserve Afoot Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battery.

Badly wounded from a grenade fragment on April 30, 1918.

Died the heroic death for his home country on May 1, 1918, in the field hospital in Nieppe, France.

Buried at the military cemetery in Pont-de-Nieppe in France.  Block 2, grave number 180.

He was 19 years old.





Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6483 on: May 01, 2018, 04:23:42 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, May 1, 1918.


HANNA PLEADS GUILTY

  Bert Hanna, better known as "the singing kid," who is charged with grand larceny, in taking a rifle, shotgun, pistol, field glass, etc., from the home ranch of E. R. Allred at Twin Springs, and who was arrested at Mason a few days ago, before Judge Averill today pleaded guilty as charged. He will be sentenced Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Another charge may be brought against Hanna for forgery, he having passed five checks, signing Allred's name to the same. Four of these checks he made good.


TRUANTS, TAKE WARNING

  With the coming of warm weather, truancy is on the increase. Chief of Police Grant and his men are each truancy officers with power to arrest. The chief stated to the Bonanza today that his force will start at once rounding up the truants and the co-operation of parents and guardians is requested. The latter are subject to a penalty if they permit their children to remain out of school unless it can be shown that they are engaged in work and are contributing to the necessary family support.


EARTH STILL TREMBLES

  LOS ANGELES, May 1. Three earthquakes were felt last night throughout the interior of southern California, and one in western Arizona. Plate glass windows were broken and merchandise was jarred from shelves in Calexico. Elsewhere there was no damage, although many suffered from fright, fearing repetition of the damage done by earth quakes that visited Unmet and San Jacinto April 21.


NOTICE!

  The parties who took rails and tools from Gold Hill Nevada Gold Mining company at Lone Mountain are requested to return same as both are now needed by the company.
 

PERSONAL

  Neil Simons departed today for Portland, Ore., where be goes to recuperate his health.
 
  James Degan, who was taken to San Francisco with threatened pneumonia, is reported to be much improved.


CLEAN-UP WARNING

  All property owners and occupants are hereby notified to immediately rake up and collect all garbage and pile it where it can be easily reached by team or truck, placing the proper ties in neat and sanitary condition not later than May 5. Any neglect of these instructions will result in prosecution for maintaining a nuisance.
J. D. GRANT, Chief of Police.


ADVERT

  Progress Bakery Bread is made in accordance with the United States food administration rules and regulations governing the manufacture of bakery products. Progress Bakery Bread is a well-flavored, tasty and appetizing loaf, made by expert bakers, and is well baked and delicious. We urge the careful use of bread; it is as good the second day as the first. 
PROGRESS BAKERY


WILL MOVE SOON

  The 319th engineers will soon move for "over there," according to word received by the Bonanza from Private Clarence Mayes. The postcard shows the building of a bridge by the boys at Camp Freemont.

  The 319th engineers are now on their way from Victoria. "Pinky" Ray of Tonopah is in this regiment. Some time ago Pinky essayed to borrow a pair of officer's puttees. He was strutting along in cocky fashion when he was apprehended and hauled before the judge advocate. The sentence was thirty days in the guardhouse, but he was given the alternative of spending thirty days on circuit singing for the benefit of the loan drive. He got as far south as Portland, Ore., before being recalled to leave with the regiment for France.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6484 on: May 02, 2018, 03:07:26 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, May 2, 1918.


Quote
Telephone exchange of a kite balloon section of the Royal Air Force in a motor lorry. Gosnay, 2 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244586 © IWM (Q 8772)


Quote
Filling an RAF kite balloon with gas. Gosnay, 2 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245681 © IWM (Q 9966)


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Two artillery officers about to enter the basket of an RAF Caquot kite balloon to act as observers. Note the motor-winch and the number of air mechanics needed to hold the balloon down. Photograph taken in Gosnay, 2nd May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247573 © IWM (Q 12031)


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Two observer officers in the basket of a kite balloon. Note the telephones, map rest, parachute and parachute harness. Photograph taken in Gosnay, 2 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247569 © IWM (Q 12027)


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RAF kite balloon ascending. Note the tow parachutes for the observers attached to the basket. Photograph taken in Gosnay, 2 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247572 © IWM (Q 12030)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6485 on: May 02, 2018, 03:55:44 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Ashland (Oregon) Tidings, May 2, 1918.


Soldiers' Letter

  Mrs. Anna Erickson is in receipt of the following letter from her son, Sergeant A. E. Erickson, of Battery C, 65th Artillery, A.E.F.:

  "My Dear Mother: I wrote you a letter yesterday, but mail is so uncertain that I don't know whether you will get it or not. We arrived here safely after a hard trip across the pond. This is a very beautiful country, everything is so old and quaint. We had a very interesting ride across this foreign land after we got off the boat, on one of their quaint trains. We never get to see a newspaper any more.

  Write me and tell me the latest news, as everything is censored here. We don't know what is going on in the outside world. We are at a rest camp again, but we don't get much rest. I can't write much on account of the censorship. I could surely tell you folks a lot of interesting things, I am in the best of health now after my seasickness.

  We are having a lot of fun with the foreign money. They won't take good old U. S. money here, and we are scared to take theirs, afraid that both sides will get the worst of It.

  Will write again in a day or so. With loving regards to all, Your loving son,
"ARTHUR."


Ancient Clock Is Valued Heirloom

  Joseph Poley of B street has in his possession a clock that beats "Grandfather's" traditional time piece by many years. The clock was made by Eli Terry & Son in Connecticut, and while it is not known the date of its manufacture, on the inside of the case the date, 1814, has been written with an indelible pencil by someone, presumably a clock repairer. Mr. Poley knows of its existence in his family from the time it was brought to Kentucky from Virginia, way back in the early part of the nineteenth century. In 1829 Joseph Poley, Sr., father of the present owner, moved from Kentucky to Illinois, and the clock has descended, a valued heirloom, to its present owner.

  It is a beautiful piece of antique furniture, with works made entirely of wood with the exception of one wheel, and keeps excellent time.

  It is wound with the old-time weights, and its striking bell is as musical as ever. The case is of natural wood, beautifully hand-carved, and the old time-piece has, so far as known, run "without slumbering" for over 100 years.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6486 on: May 02, 2018, 10:35:02 PM »
Actor William Holden was born on April 17, 1918. 

Biography: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Holden

With Inglorious Bitch in Sabrina (1954)
By Studio publicity still - Dr. Macro, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=14855881

Sorry I missed this on the day of. Here's my remembrance: https://holden100.wordpress.com/2018/04/16/william-holden-at-100-realizing-you-both-cant-be-pike-bishop/

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6487 on: May 03, 2018, 01:20:13 AM »
Sorry I missed this on the day of. Here's my remembrance: https://holden100.wordpress.com/2018/04/16/william-holden-at-100-realizing-you-both-cant-be-pike-bishop/

Damn, El, I didn't know you were a writer.  Thanks for putting your remembrance here in this thread.  Well written, and I like how your mom got to meet the man.   

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6488 on: May 03, 2018, 03:57:23 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, May 3, 1918.


DEATH OF A MINER

  Thomas Rooney, aged 49 years, died last evening at the county hospital. He was a native of Kentucky. No relatives have been located. He was ill for the past eighteen months from uremic poisoning and tuberculosis, coming here from Reveille. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon from the undertaking parlors, interment in the local cemetery.


CASE OF BLOOD POISONING

  Victor Lambertuccl, who conducts a truck farm several miles below town, was operated upon today at the county hospital, where he is a private patient. He was suffering from blood poisoning in the thumb of his right hand.


ENGINEERS FEEL BULLY

  That army life agrees with John Donnelly is evident from a postcard received by the Bonanza. He is located with his regiment, the 27th engineers, at Camp Meade, Maryland. He says: "Send along some more miners. They are needed. This is a good camp and promises to be permanent."


CLARENCE SENDS REGARDS
 
  Clarence H. Mayes, formerly member of the Tonopah fire department, but now at Camp Fremont with the 319th engineers, writes that the Tonopah boys are all feeling O. K. and wish to be remembered to the home folk. They are training hard and eager to be "over there."


ENJOYS ARMY LIFE
 
  Charles H. Evans of the 319th engineers writes from Camp Fremont that he enjoys army life. He has gained fifteen pounds since entering the service. Mr. Evans will take examination for rank of master engineer.


JOINS THE COLOR8

  Carl Stout, an expert machinist employed at Campbell Kelley's foundry and machine shop, he having come here from the Union Iron works, has decided to forego his big pay and pleasant job and fight for Uncle Sam in the air. He has already passed the preliminary examination. Mr. Stout's seventeen years experience, along quasi-military lines, makes him all the more competent and all the more eager to serve his country in the aviation department in its time of need. He leaves for the coast Monday morning.


WARMEST DAY OF SPRING

  This was the warmest day of the season thus far. At 2 p. m. the government thermometer registered 74 degrees. It was several degrees warmer downtown.


PERSONAL

W. A. Ray, county surveyor, is confined to his home with the grippe.


FOR SALE
 
  Northern Saloon, Goldfield, Nev., going out of business on account of sickness. Will sell everything entire or will sell fixtures, billiard tables, glassware, etc., separate. Address Northern Saloon. 


THIS REALLY HAPPENED

  Milt Detch had been toiling all day at his desk, nothing to eat since morn except coffee and indigestibles. He strayed into a "place" for a wee bit of tonic before dining. Dick Williams noted the hungry look on the lawyer's countenance and said: "Milt, this is the first day of the season, you know. How'd you like to take a dozen little rainbows down to the restaurant and have them fried in olive oil with a strip of bacon?"
 
  The attorney's face bent, then cracked and finally broke into a grin of beatitude and bliss: "Lead them to me."

  "Well, you see how it is, Milt. Doc Harrison and I are going out Sunday to catch "em."


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6489 on: May 03, 2018, 08:18:40 AM »
Damn, El, I didn't know you were a writer.  Thanks for putting your remembrance here in this thread.  Well written, and I like how your mom got to meet the man.

Thanks. Love your thread :)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6490 on: May 04, 2018, 03:24:13 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, May 4, 1918.


Quote
Soldiers with a cage of canaries they found among the ruins in Amiens, 4 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246756 © IWM (Q 11138)


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French and British soldier in front of the High Altar of the Amiens Cathedral, showing one of the piles of sandbags by which the carvings were protected, 4 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246618 © IWM (Q 10985)


Quote
French and British gunners sharing water to wash themselves near Villers-Bretonneux, 4 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246584 © IWM (Q 10946)


R.I.P.


Quote
2 Lieutenant  Sidney Montague Olden, 1 Battalion, Border Regiment. Killed in action, aged 29, near Vieux Berquin on 4 May 1918. He is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205023838 © IWM (HU 93487)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6491 on: May 04, 2018, 04:14:55 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, May 4, 1918.


STILL NO TRACE OF OAKLAND PRO-GERMAN

  SAN JOSE, Cal., May 4. The police have found no trace of H. Stelnmoltz, alleged pro-German Oakland, who was reported hanged until unconscious, five miles from here early Thursday by a band of masked men who styled themselves the "Knights of Liberty."

  It was thought that Steinmoltz had been taken back to Oakland by the "knights."

  George Koetzer of San Jose, who was tarred and feathered at the same time Steinmoltz was hanged, is still in the county jail here for protection.

  The San Jose "Knights of Liberty" invaded San Francisco last Friday night, took a man to Golden Gate park and hanged him until he recanted his alleged disloyal utterances and promised to buy Liberty bonds, It was reported yesterday. The man was captured in a doorway near Fillmore street, bundled into an automobile and carried off without molestation, according to the story.


TAKEN TO HOSPITAL

  Dick Williams, owner of Gold Mountain properties and trouble shooter for the Western Union Telegraph company, was taken ill yesterday afternoon and removed to the county hospital, where he is a private patient. Mr. William's malady does not seem serious at this time, it being an attack of the grippe.
 

HANNA TO PRISON

  When Bert Hanna was taken before Judge Averill yesterday afternoon for sentence on the charge of grand larceny, he said he had nothing to say in extenuation. He was sentenced to from one to seven years in the state prison and was taken to Carson City today by Sheriff Thomas.


LIEUTENANT BELLAMY WRITES FROM FRANCE - INTERESTING LETTER RECEIVED BY MRS. E. A. PAGE OF HOT CREEK

  Mrs. E. A. Page of Hot Creek is recipient of a letter from Some where in France, written by her nephew, Lieutenant H. Bellamy, who enlisted at the first call. His mother was Miss Mollle Godat, who lived at Tybo with Mrs. Page from 1876 to 1882. The lieutenant says:

  "Our mail service is sometimes on the blink. Usually we are pretty lucky but it wasn't such a long time ago that I received a letter from you dated in November and several months overdue. It had followed me from Camp Greene, North Carolina, over several camps and many miles of water and land.

  I am feeling fine and have plenty to do. We are quartered in what was formerly a French camp, but has been turned over to the United States. Our barracks are comfortable and our food fine. In fact, we are getting along better than we did in the United States.

  The weather here is comparable to Florida or California, although we do have chilly nights here. I don't get out of camp very much and when I do it isn't much use as my knowledge of the French language is nil.

  While your two sons, Claude and Merle, cannot enlist, I know that they are doing their part in the way of farming and stock raising. You can't fight on nothing, so that the United States must leave somebody to keep up the supplies."


RESIGNS AS MATRON
 
  Miss S. N. Bryan, who had been matron at the county hospital for the past several years and who recently was suspended, pending an investigation, and subsequently reinstated, tendered her resignation late yesterday afternoon to the board of county commissioners. It was accepted. The commissioners appointed Miss Hazel Sanderson as matron.




Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6492 on: May 04, 2018, 04:18:06 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, May 4, 1918.


STILL NO TRACE OF OAKLAND PRO-GERMAN

  SAN JOSE, Cal., May 4. The police have found no trace of H. Stelnmoltz, alleged pro-German Oakland, who was reported hanged until unconscious, five miles from here early Thursday by a band of masked men who styled themselves the "Knights of Liberty."

  It was thought that Steinmoltz had been taken back to Oakland by the "knights."

  George Koetzer of San Jose, who was tarred and feathered at the same time Steinmoltz was hanged, is still in the county jail here for protection.

  The San Jose "Knights of Liberty" invaded San Francisco last Friday night, took a man to Golden Gate park and hanged him until he recanted his alleged disloyal utterances and promised to buy Liberty bonds, It was reported yesterday. The man was captured in a doorway near Fillmore street, bundled into an automobile and carried off without molestation, according to the story.


TAKEN TO HOSPITAL

  Dick Williams, owner of Gold Mountain properties and trouble shooter for the Western Union Telegraph company, was taken ill yesterday afternoon and removed to the county hospital, where he is a private patient. Mr. William's malady does not seem serious at this time, it being an attack of the grippe.
 

HANNA TO PRISON

  When Bert Hanna was taken before Judge Averill yesterday afternoon for sentence on the charge of grand larceny, he said he had nothing to say in extenuation. He was sentenced to from one to seven years in the state prison and was taken to Carson City today by Sheriff Thomas.


LIEUTENANT BELLAMY WRITES FROM FRANCE - INTERESTING LETTER RECEIVED BY MRS. E. A. PACE OF HOT CREEK

  Mrs. E. A. Page of Hot Creek is recipient of a letter from Some where in France, written by her nephew. Lieutenant H. Bellamy, who enlisted at the first call. His mother was Miss Mollle Godat, who lived at Tybo with Mrs. Page from 1876 to 1882. The lieutenant says:

  "Our mail service is sometimes on the blink. Usually we are pretty lucky but it wasn't such a long time ago that I received a letter from you dated in November and several months overdue. It had followed me from Camp Greene, North Carolina, over several camps and many miles of water and land.

  I am feeling fine and have plenty to do. We are quartered in what was formerly a French camp, but has been turned over to the United States. Our barracks are comfortable and our food fine. In fact, we are getting along better than we did in the United States.

  The weather here is comparable to Florida or California, although we do have chilly nights here. I don't get out of camp very much and when I do it isn't much use as my knowledge of the French language is nil.

  While your two sons, Claude and Merle, cannot enlist, I know that they are doing their part in the way of farming and stock raising. You can't fight on nothing, so that the United States must leave somebody to keep up the supplies."


RESIGNS AS MATRON
 
  Miss S. N. Bryan, who had been matron at the county hospital for the past several years and who recently was suspended, pending an investigation, and subsequently reinstated, tendered her resignation late yesterday afternoon to the board of county commissioners. It was accepted. The commissioners appointed Miss Hazel Sanderson as matron.




Surprised to see things like lobster, oysters and scallops on the menu in Tonapoh.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6493 on: May 04, 2018, 04:27:11 AM »
Surprised to see things like lobster, oysters and scallops on the menu in Tonapoh.

I know.  mr. albrecht once said that he wouldn't dare eat any kind of fish like that, so far away from the ocean.  Also I noticed that one no longer has to wait until 5:00 o'clock to order baked potatoes.  Did they get a bigger oven?   

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6494 on: May 04, 2018, 08:37:54 AM »
Quote
At Haymarket Square in Chicago, Illinois, a bomb is thrown at a squad of policemen attempting to break up a labor rally. The police responded with wild gunfire, killing several people in the crowd and injuring dozens more.

The demonstration, which drew some 1,500 Chicago workers, was organized by German-born labor radicals in protest of the killing of a striker by the Chicago police the day before. Midway into the rally, which had thinned out because of rain, a force of nearly 200 policemen arrived to disperse the workers. As the police advanced toward the 300 remaining protesters, an individual who was never positively identified threw a bomb at them. After the explosion and subsequent police gunfire, more than a dozen people lay dead or dying, and close to 100 were injured.

The Haymarket Square Riot set off a national wave of xenophobia, as hundreds of foreign-born radicals and labor leaders were rounded up in Chicago and elsewhere. A grand jury eventually indicted 31 suspected labor radicals in connection with the bombing, and eight men were convicted in a sensational and controversial trial. Judge Joseph E. Gary imposed the death sentence on seven of the men, and the eighth was sentenced to 15 years in prison. On November 11, 1887, Samuel Fielden, Adolph Fischer, August Spies, and Albert Parson were executed.

Of the three others sentenced to death, one committed suicide on the eve of his execution and the other two had their death sentences commuted to life imprisonment by Illinois Governor Richard J. Oglesby. Governor Oglesby was reacting to widespread public questioning of their guilt, which later led his successor, Governor John P. Altgeld, to pardon fully the three activists still living in 1893.

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/the-haymarket-square-riot

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6495 on: May 04, 2018, 09:08:37 AM »
Surprised to see things like lobster, oysters and scallops on the menu in Tonapoh.

The lobster and oysters most likely were canned.  No scallops.  On that menu it states Scollops (scallops) of veal.  Not certain why it's spelled 'scollops.'

The Sanddab (listed as Catalina San Dabs) may be suspicious.  Not sure how long it would take for them to get that fish fresh from California during that era.  Maybe a day or so packed in ice?

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6496 on: May 04, 2018, 01:04:59 PM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, May 4, 1918.


STILL NO TRACE OF OAKLAND PRO-GERMAN

  SAN JOSE, Cal., May 4. The police have found no trace of H. Stelnmoltz, alleged pro-German Oakland, who was reported hanged until unconscious, five miles from here early Thursday by a band of masked men who styled themselves the "Knights of Liberty."

  It was thought that Steinmoltz had been taken back to Oakland by the "knights."

  George Koetzer of San Jose, who was tarred and feathered at the same time Steinmoltz was hanged, is still in the county jail here for protection.

  The San Jose "Knights of Liberty" invaded San Francisco last Friday night, took a man to Golden Gate park and hanged him until he recanted his alleged disloyal utterances and promised to buy Liberty bonds, It was reported yesterday. The man was captured in a doorway near Fillmore street, bundled into an automobile and carried off without molestation, according to the story.


LIEUTENANT BELLAMY WRITES FROM FRANCE - INTERESTING LETTER RECEIVED BY MRS. E. A. PAGE OF HOT CREEK

  Mrs. E. A. Page of Hot Creek is recipient of a letter from Some where in France, written by her nephew, Lieutenant H. Bellamy, who enlisted at the first call. His mother was Miss Mollle Godat, who lived at Tybo with Mrs. Page from 1876 to 1882.
More actions of the "Knights of Liberty":
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tulsa_Outrage
http://thislandpress.com/2012/04/18/tate-brady-battle-greenwood/

His mother was a "miss?" Hmmm.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6497 on: May 05, 2018, 02:09:56 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, May 5, 1918.


Quote
American troops on board the steamship USS Mount Vernon (ex-SS Kronprinzessin Cecilie) at Brest, 5 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205183538 © IWM (Q 93066)


Quote
An American 320 mm gun on railway mounting north of Mailly, 5 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205307461 © IWM (Q 58209)


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Troops of the American 369th Infantry Regiment (Harlem Hellfighters/Black Rattlers, 93rd Infantry Division) manning a trench near Maffrecourt, 5 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205359134 © IWM (Q 69943)


Quote
The Battle of the Lys. Royal Artillery gunners outside their billet at Saint-Floris, 5 May 1918. One of them is cleaning a Lewis machine gun while another is having a shave.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238516 © IWM (Q 6600)


R.I.P.


Quote
Miss Elizabeth M Warnock, Voluntary Aid Detachments. Died of illness contracted on duty in France 05 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205381399 © IWM (WWC D13-H2-74)


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6498 on: May 05, 2018, 02:45:09 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Rogue River (Oregon) Courier, May 5, 1918.


ROBBERS MISS ORE AND TAKE BAGS OF SLAG - HUNT FOR MEN IN PROGRESS

  While the country has been flooded with descriptions of the two men who robbed the Boswell mine near Holland Thursday night, no clue has yet been discovered that would lead to the arrest of the bandits.

  The identities of the two men are known. They have been living in a little shack about a mile from the Boswell claim for the past month, waiting for an opportunity to "cleanup" when the proper time presented itself. That they had kept close watch on what was going on is shown by the opportune time they chose to make the coupe.

  R. Boswell and son were at their retort in the yard melting down the pannings of the past few weeks. They had about $5,500 worth of gold with them in the yard. While they were at work, with the yellow liquid glowing in the retort, the two men, with handkerchiefs tied over their mouths, suddenly stepped out with drawn guns and ordered the Boswells to throw up their hands. After they had tied their victims to trees they proceeded to pour out the gold and mold it into bars.

  About three weeks ago young Boswell noticed that one of the men had the middle finger on his right hand cut off at the second joint. While the gun was being pointed at him he observed the same finger. The men claimed to be looking for chrome. As Boswell was tied to the tree he asked the man how the chrome business was.

  "This beats the hell out of the chrome business," he replied.

  It is the opinion of Sheriff Lewis and Deputy Lister that the men will go over onto Indian Creek and drop down into Happy Camp in California. They may hide a few miles from the scene of their crime for a few days before attempting to travel much.

  The curious part of the incident is that the Boswells are the least concerned of anyone. While they do not fancy the loss of $6,000 in gold, they are more angry than anything else and it is to get the parties that were so liberal to themselves that they are after.

  The robbers took two slugs worth $2,200 each, one of about $1,500 and $400 or $500 worth of dust. They overlooked $250 in dust near at hand, and the joke on them is that they carried off two bags of slag which is comparatively worthless.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6499 on: May 05, 2018, 05:08:23 PM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Rogue River (Oregon) Courier, May 5, 1918.


ROBBERS MISS ORE AND TAKE BAGS OF SLAG - HUNT FOR MEN IN PROGRESS

  While the country has been flooded with descriptions of the two men who robbed the Boswell mine near Holland Thursday night, no clue has yet been discovered that would lead to the arrest of the bandits.

  The identities of the two men are known. They have been living in a little shack about a mile from the Boswell claim for the past month, waiting for an opportunity to "cleanup" when the proper time presented itself. That they had kept close watch on what was going on is shown by the opportune time they chose to make the coupe.

  R. Boswell and son were at their retort in the yard melting down the pannings of the past few weeks. They had about $5,500 worth of gold with them in the yard. While they were at work, with the yellow liquid glowing in the retort, the two men, with handkerchiefs tied over their mouths, suddenly stepped out with drawn guns and ordered the Boswells to throw up their hands. After they had tied their victims to trees they proceeded to pour out the gold and mold it into bars.

  About three weeks ago young Boswell noticed that one of the men had the middle finger on his right hand cut off at the second joint. While the gun was being pointed at him he observed the same finger. The men claimed to be looking for chrome. As Boswell was tied to the tree he asked the man how the chrome business was.

  "This beats the hell out of the chrome business," he replied.

  It is the opinion of Sheriff Lewis and Deputy Lister that the men will go over onto Indian Creek and drop down into Happy Camp in California. They may hide a few miles from the scene of their crime for a few days before attempting to travel much.

  The curious part of the incident is that the Boswells are the least concerned of anyone. While they do not fancy the loss of $6,000 in gold, they are more angry than anything else and it is to get the parties that were so liberal to themselves that they are after.

  The robbers took two slugs worth $2,200 each, one of about $1,500 and $400 or $500 worth of dust. They overlooked $250 in dust near at hand, and the joke on them is that they carried off two bags of slag which is comparatively worthless.
I wonder how the Boswells escaped? Being tied to a tree at some remote mine could be trouble. I hope they catch the scoundrels.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6500 on: May 05, 2018, 06:22:00 PM »
I wonder how the Boswells escaped? Being tied to a tree at some remote mine could be trouble. I hope they catch the scoundrels.

I forgot to mention, this was the second article.  The first (May 4, 1918) reported the robbery itself and noted that the younger Boswell worked himself loose from the tree.  Will keep you posted on the outcome, if any.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6501 on: May 05, 2018, 09:43:35 PM »
The lobster and oysters most likely were canned.  No scallops.  On that menu it states Scollops (scallops) of veal.  Not certain why it's spelled 'scollops.'

The Sanddab (listed as Catalina San Dabs) may be suspicious.  Not sure how long it would take for them to get that fish fresh from California during that era.  Maybe a day or so packed in ice?
Reefers were invented by then so if the town was on a railline iced or refridgerated goods could be sent. If the town was making a lot of money and had spenders to spend it they could import?
I'm trying to recall but a few years ago I read a book about cattle barons and how many of them built amazing houses and operated social-clubs/restaurants and would import exotic foods, actresses, etc. A lot were very rich and also a lot of investment from 'the old country,' Scotland in particular.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6502 on: May 05, 2018, 09:44:50 PM »
I forgot to mention, this was the second article.  The first (May 4, 1918) reported the robbery itself and noted that the younger Boswell worked himself loose from the tree.  Will keep you posted on the outcome, if any.
I always thought old Western shows were not true but stories such as this make me think they were truer than I suspected.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6503 on: May 06, 2018, 03:45:23 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, May 6, 1918.


Quote
A French frontline and outpost position near Cachy, 6 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323598 © IWM (Q 78838)


Quote
British soldiers erecting a camouflage screen beside a road at Abeele, near Poperinghe, 6 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205091647 © IWM (Q 8803)


Quote
Military traffic control signal post at Blendecques, 6 May 1918. Note signboard pointing way to No. 7 General Hospital.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244611 © IWM (Q 8802)


R.I.P.


Quote
Gunner Charles Thomas Edgington 80314. Unit: A Battery, 47th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Death: 06 May 1918 France Western Front. Only son of Charles and Florence Edgington, of 245, Queen's Rd., Dalston, London. Enlisted 11th Aug., 1914. Served in France from the 15th March, 1915.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205294197 © IWM (HU 121624)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6504 on: May 06, 2018, 05:09:42 AM »
From the Library of Congress, May 6, 1918.


The Tonopah Daily Bonanza.

 
YOUNG MAN KILLED AT AURORA MINE

  James Gordon, aged seventeen years, two months and eighteen days was instantly killed at the Aurora Consolidated mine at 6 o'clock Friday afternoon, when a giant cap which he was placing on a six-foot fuse exploded. The cap house, in which young Gordon was at work in his capacity as tool nipper, was completely wrecked.

  The remains were brought from Aurora to the Kitz-Meyer undertaking parlors last evening by A. S. Bryant and R. W. Sawyer of Bridgeport. Fred Gordon, the blacksmith at the Aurora Consolidated mine, is the father of the dead boy. Mr. and Mrs. Gordon and a son and a daughter will arrive from Aurora today, and, with a daughter who lives in Reno, will this evening take the remains to Woodlands, California, for burial, says the Carson News.

  The deceased was one of the most popular young men of his home community. He was anxious to complete his education and was expecting to leave the camp sometime next month.


WHAT'S WHAT

Gentlemen:

  I don't like to have to tell you your business, but it would please me very much if you would have the sprinkling wagons get out early in the morning and sprinkle Main street. The way they are doing now is not as effective as it would be if they would get the water on the track before the ponies stir up the dust. I talked it over with Charley Slavln and it's satisfactory to him, so please attend to it at once.
Yours respectfully,
POO BAH.


MISS TENDERFOOT

  Young lady (on her first visit west) What do you have that coil of line on your saddle for? Cowboy, That line, as you call it, lady, we use for catching cattle and horses. Young lady, How interesting! And what do you use for bait?


MERGER DECLARED VALID
 
  WASHINGTON, May 6 The supreme court declared valid the merger in 1908 of the Cumberland Presbyterian church with the Presbyterian church.


The Rogue River Courier.

THREE MEN GO OVER STEEP CLIFF
 
  The escape from what seems like certain death of Harold K. Barton and Phil Robinson, of this city, and Jack Finch, of Kerby, who pitched over a 100 foot embankment near Crescent City Saturday afternoon, reads more like a Dick Carter adventure than the truth. But it is  often sald that truth is stranger than fiction.

  About 1 o'clock Saturday afternoon the three men were on their way to Crescent City in an automobile and were traveling along the road between Berteleda and Adam Station. 10 miles this side of Crescent City. Barton was driving and as the machine proceeded along the extremely narrow road and was about to round a curve Barton reached back to take a piece of chocolate from one of his companions. The car was in low gear and was not making more than five mile an hour at the time, but Barton's glance from the road was long enough to permit the car to run straight ahead and the front wheel to get over the grade before he could stop.  The machine pitched over the steep cliff, throwing the men clear, and turned over three times before it lodged at the top of a tree 100 feet below. Smith river runs along 300 feet below the road, and but for the fact that the car caught in the tree the car would have gone clear into the water.

  Barton. and Finch were rendered unconscious from the fall. Robinson, although thrown further down the hill, was able to crawl up and revive his companions and get them onto the road. They succeeded in getting to a telephone and George S. Robinson, of this city, hastened to the place as fast as he could and brought the party back to Grants Pass.

  Barton received a cut on the head and body bruises. The others were considerably bruised, but the escape of all was the veriest kind of a miracle, The bank is almost perpendicular and how a car could go over it and its occupants escape death is a mystery.


The Seattle Star.






Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6505 on: May 06, 2018, 04:51:40 PM »
From the Library of Congress, May 6, 1918.


The Tonopah Daily Bonanza.

 
YOUNG MAN KILLED AT AURORA MINE

  James Gordon, aged seventeen years, two months and eighteen days was instantly killed at the Aurora Consolidated mine at 6 o'clock Friday afternoon, when a giant cap which he was placing on a six-foot fuse exploded. The cap house, in which young Gordon was at work in his capacity as tool nipper, was completely wrecked.

  The remains were brought from Aurora to the Kitz-Meyer undertaking parlors last evening by A. S. Bryant and R. W. Sawyer of Bridgeport. Fred Gordon, the blacksmith at the Aurora Consolidated mine, is the father of the dead boy. Mr. and Mrs. Gordon and a son and a daughter will arrive from Aurora today, and, with a daughter who lives in Reno, will this evening take the remains to Woodlands, California, for burial, says the Carson News.

  The deceased was one of the most popular young men of his home community. He was anxious to complete his education and was expecting to leave the camp sometime next month.


WHAT'S WHAT

Gentlemen:

  I don't like to have to tell you your business, but it would please me very much if you would have the sprinkling wagons get out early in the morning and sprinkle Main street. The way they are doing now is not as effective as it would be if they would get the water on the track before the ponies stir up the dust. I talked it over with Charley Slavln and it's satisfactory to him, so please attend to it at once.
Yours respectfully,
POO BAH.


MISS TENDERFOOT

  Young lady (on her first visit west) What do you have that coil of line on your saddle for? Cowboy, That line, as you call it, lady, we use for catching cattle and horses. Young lady, How interesting! And what do you use for bait?


MERGER DECLARED VALID
 
  WASHINGTON, May 6 The supreme court declared valid the merger in 1908 of the Cumberland Presbyterian church with the Presbyterian church.


The Rogue River Courier.

THREE MEN GO OVER STEEP CLIFF
 
  The escape from what seems like certain death of Harold K. Barton and Phil Robinson, of this city, and Jack Finch, of Kerby, who pitched over a 100 foot embankment near Crescent City Saturday afternoon, reads more like a Dick Carter adventure than the truth. But it is  often sald that truth is stranger than fiction.

  About 1 o'clock Saturday afternoon the three men were on their way to Crescent City in an automobile and were traveling along the road between Berteleda and Adam Station. 10 miles this side of Crescent City. Barton was driving and as the machine proceeded along the extremely narrow road and was about to round a curve Barton reached back to take a piece of chocolate from one of his companions. The car was in low gear and was not making more than five mile an hour at the time, but Barton's glance from the road was long enough to permit the car to run straight ahead and the front wheel to get over the grade before he could stop.  The machine pitched over the steep cliff, throwing the men clear, and turned over three times before it lodged at the top of a tree 100 feet below. Smith river runs along 300 feet below the road, and but for the fact that the car caught in the tree the car would have gone clear into the water.

  Barton. and Finch were rendered unconscious from the fall. Robinson, although thrown further down the hill, was able to crawl up and revive his companions and get them onto the road. They succeeded in getting to a telephone and George S. Robinson, of this city, hastened to the place as fast as he could and brought the party back to Grants Pass.

Why was the
  Barton received a cut on the head and body bruises. The others were considerably bruised, but the escape of all was the veriest kind of a miracle, The bank is almost perpendicular and how a car could go over it and its occupants escape death is a mystery.


The Seattle Star.
Too bad there aren't pictures of that car crash! Like something out of a movie, the miracle that the lone tree stopped the car and saved them.  Bertelada is no longer around but the accident was somewhere in this area....
https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Adams+Station,+California+95543//@41.8427747,-124.0264094,13z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m8!4m7!1m5!1m1!1s0x54d014bb03a954db:0x5c75011bb9fd94bc!2m2!1d-123.99139!2d41.84278!1m0

I tried to find information on the church merger but couldn't except one notice of a new church being built because 'they had to move due to a merger.' I was wondering why the Court would be involved. But I couldn't find it.
I did find a Court opinion over a Tonopah mining claim dispute in that year.
https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/247/450/

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6506 on: May 07, 2018, 03:25:04 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, May 7, 1918.


Quote
American troopship USS Great Northern arriving in Brest with American troops, 7 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205307505 © IWM (Q 58260)


Quote
Repairing a damaged Nieuport aeroplane at No. 7 American Field Aviation Centre at Issoudun, 7 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205312759 © IWM (Q 65565)


Quote
Officer and one of his soldiers tending canaries rescued in the war area. Neulette, 7 May 1918. It might be Second Lieutenant Thomas Aitken, one of the British official photographers on the Western Front.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205221920 © IWM (Q 10949)


Quote
Bombardment of Bethune in April 1918. British officers outside ruins of a pharmacy in Bethune, 7 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246627 © IWM (Q 10994)


Quote
Gunner of the Royal Field Artillery sitting by his 18 pounder gun, camouflaged with a covering of straw. Near Corbie, 7 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205091917 © IWM (Q 6495)


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6507 on: May 07, 2018, 04:24:46 AM »
From the Library of Congress, May 7, 1918.


The Rogue River Courier.

DELIVERYMAN BRUISED IN MOTORCYCLE CRASH

  Claude Ainsworth, deliveryman for the River Banks Creamery, was painfully, although perhaps not seriously injured today, when the motorcycle on which he was riding refused to respond to his regulation and threw him onto a lamp post in front of the Kinney & Truax store.

  Ainsworth was riding north on Sixth street, and when he went to release the clutch on his machine to slow down to turn the corner it stuck, making it impossible for him to turn at the speed he was making and he was carried to the sidewalk, where he was wrapped around the post.

  He was cared for by Dr. Loughridge, who found an injury on the knee and severe bruises about the chest. It is not thought that the wounds will be serious and Ainsworth is expected to be out in a day or two.


AN AX ON BICYCLE CUTS GASH IN THIGH

  Frank Buffington, of Hugo was badly cut on the thigh yesterday when an ax, which was strapped to a bicycle which he was riding, came down on him when he was thrown from the wheel. Buffington was coasting down hill near Hugo, the double-bitted ax tied to the crossbar of his bicycle. In trying to slack up, the coaster brake caught, causing the wheel to stop suddenly and threw the rider over the handlebars. The bicycle came on over and the sharp ax struck him in the thigh, cutting a gash four inches long and one-half inch deep. He was brought to this city and the wound was sewed up by Dr. S. Loughbridge.


The Tonopah Daily Bonanza.


ILL WITH PNEUMONIA

  James Kerns, son of Frank P. Kerns, who was taken ill with pneumonia several days ago, is in quite a critical condition. It had been the intention of his father to take him to California on today's train, but the drawing room could not be secured, another invalid being taken to a lower climate. If conditions are favorable tomorrow the young man will be removed to the coast.

 
OPERATION PERFORMED

  Yesterday afternoon at the Mine Operator's hospital, Joe Farrell, son of Mrs. P. H. Farrell, was operated upon for appendicitis. Drs. Church, Masterson and Cunningham performed the operation. This afternoon the young man was resting comfortably and it is thought that his convalescence will be rapid.


WATER WAGONS BUSY

  "Pooh Bah's" request has been granted and the sprinkling carts have been sent out by the commissioners in the early morn to moisten the track before the ponies stir up the dust.


The Seattle Star.



Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6508 on: May 07, 2018, 04:31:27 PM »
From the Library of Congress, May 7, 1918.


The Rogue River Courier.

DELIVERYMAN BRUISED IN MOTORCYCLE CRASH

  Claude Ainsworth, deliveryman for the River Banks Creamery, was painfully, although perhaps not seriously injured today, when the motorcycle on which he was riding refused to respond to his regulation and threw him onto a lamp post in front of the Kinney & Truax store.

  Ainsworth was riding north on Sixth street, and when he went to release the clutch on his machine to slow down to turn the corner it stuck, making it impossible for him to turn at the speed he was making and he was carried to the sidewalk, where he was wrapped around the post.

  He was cared for by Dr. Loughridge, who found an injury on the knee and severe bruises about the chest. It is not thought that the wounds will be serious and Ainsworth is expected to be out in a day or two.


AN AX ON BICYCLE CUTS GASH IN THIGH

  Frank Buffington, of Hugo was badly cut on the thigh yesterday when an ax, which was strapped to a bicycle which he was riding, came down on him when he was thrown from the wheel. Buffington was coasting down hill near Hugo, the double-bitted ax tied to the crossbar of his bicycle. In trying to slack up, the coaster brake caught, causing the wheel to stop suddenly and threw the rider over the handlebars. The bicycle came on over and the sharp ax struck him in the thigh, cutting a gash four inches long and one-half inch deep. He was brought to this city and the wound was sewed up by Dr. S. Loughbridge.


The Tonopah Daily Bonanza.


ILL WITH PNEUMONIA

  James Kerns, son of Frank P. Kerns, who was taken ill with pneumonia several days ago, is in quite a critical condition. It had been the intention of his father to take him to California on today's train, but the drawing room could not be secured, another invalid being taken to a lower climate. If conditions are favorable tomorrow the young man will be removed to the coast.

 
OPERATION PERFORMED

  Yesterday afternoon at the Mine Operator's hospital, Joe Farrell, son of Mrs. P. H. Farrell, was operated upon for appendicitis. Drs. Church, Masterson and Cunningham performed the operation. This afternoon the young man was resting comfortably and it is thought that his convalescence will be rapid.


WATER WAGONS BUSY

  "Pooh Bah's" request has been granted and the sprinkling carts have been sent out by the commissioners in the early morn to moisten the track before the ponies stir up the dust.


The Seattle Star.
Riding a bike with a double-bit ax tied to it. You just don't see things like that any more. Though as "ax throwing" is becoming popular with the hipster crowd it wouldn't not surprise me to see this soon in Austin.
https://batlgrounds.com/
https://www.austin360.com/entertainment/austin-first-ever-axe-throwing-club-set-open-this-summer/YLIvwaRIhdwA4uzJEZ4bJJ/

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6509 on: May 08, 2018, 03:10:22 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, May 8, 1918.


Quote
A group of First Aid Nursing Yeomanry ambulance drivers attached to the Belgian Army at Calais on 8 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205214416 © IWM (Q 3257)


Quote
Horses of the Royal Scots Greys resting by the road near Montreuil, 8 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235820 © IWM (Q 3270)


Quote
Royal Scots Greys resting by the road near Montreuil, 8 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235819 © IWM (Q 3269)


Quote
French troops by the German A7V tank "Elfriede" which turned over in a pit during the first German attack on 24 April 1918, one kilometre from Villers-Bretonneux on the Hangard-en-Santerre road, 8 May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205304922 © IWM (Q 55073)


R.I.P.


Quote
Private Herbert William Walker Donaldson 51129. Unit: Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment). Death: 8 May 1918, Ypres, Western Front. Son of the late Surgeon-Major James Donaldson (Madras Establishment), and the late Agnes Campbell Donaldson. Trained at Kingston Academy, Ontario, and served for 20 years in North-West Mounted Police.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205026082 © IWM (HU 96635)