Author One Hundred Years Ago  (Read 258123 times)

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Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #300 on: January 11, 2016, 10:43:34 PM »
Poked around some more on the K-R-I-T Motor Car Company.   

Lo and behold the factory was located on 1608  East Grand Boulevard in Detroit.    This puts it catty korner from the old
Packard plant [Some buds and I went creeping around the Packard plant after a Tiger game once -what the devil were we thinking?]

Here is an engraving of the exterior of the Krit factory:



and some pictures from the inside:




They turned out some sharp looking rigs:


Fantastic photos of the plant interior.  Looks like a lot of their lighting came from all of those windows.  I notice they had what looks to be a sprinkler system in that second interior photo.  Or it could be an air line to hook air tools up to?

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #301 on: January 11, 2016, 10:54:09 PM »
The guy in the second fight is all cocky and gets knocked on his ass.  LMAO


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #302 on: January 12, 2016, 01:48:25 PM »
Max Immelmann and Oswald Boelcke earned the "Blue Max" for 8 victories on the same day, a hundred years ago today.




Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #303 on: January 12, 2016, 03:01:44 PM »
Max Immelmann and Oswald Boelcke earned the "Blue Max" for 8 victories on the same day, a hundred years ago today.




Nice "shiner" on Oswald in the upper right photo.  I wonder if he landed hard and hit his head against the cockpit dash?

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #304 on: January 12, 2016, 03:08:12 PM »
Good stuff!

Max Immelmann developed the famous Immelmann turn:


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #305 on: January 12, 2016, 03:21:37 PM »
Nice "shiner" on Oswald in the upper right photo.  I wonder if he landed hard and hit his head against the cockpit dash?

He sure does look beat up in the lower photograph, too, and the photographer may have positioned the first one to minimize it.  I haven't found any references to his injuries.

Both men were dead by next winter.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #306 on: January 12, 2016, 03:31:37 PM »
You can now read the latest
 issue of London's "Punch" magazine, that has just been printed up, a hundred years ago, today.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/22672/22672-h/22672-h.htm

Here are a some items of interest from it:

An American barque with a cargo of beans for Germany has been seized and unloaded by the Swedish authorities. A cruel fate seems to overtake every effort of the United States to give Germany these necessary commodities.

Several inmates of the Swansea workhouse, having been told that margarine was to be served out instead of butter, returned their portions, only to discover that it was butter after all. As similar incidents have occurred in many other establishments it is suggested that margarine should in future be dyed scarlet or blue in order to prevent a repetition of these embarrassing contretemps.

Extract from a letter written to a loved one from the Front:—
 "I received your dear little note in a sandbag. You say that you hope the sandbag stops a bullet. Well, to tell the truth, I hope it don't, as I have been patching my trousers with it."
 
From a chemist's reminiscences:—
"In the early part of the last century the sale of leeches was one of the most important. Doctors bled their patients for every imaginable ailment. To-day all that we can say of leeches is that we just keep them."—Observer.
 As pets, we suppose.

Also, a number of nicely drawn cartoons, some of which are actually funny.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #307 on: January 12, 2016, 03:39:19 PM »
Extract from the Seattle School Board minutes for today, and a related item from a Salem, OR newspaper.  The Pledge of Allegiance was still pretty new (1892).

The admiral has forgotten the Civil War in his list -- maybe too recent and painful?  If only he knew what was coming.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #308 on: January 12, 2016, 03:40:22 PM »
Several inmates of the Swansea workhouse, having been told that margarine was to be served out instead of butter, returned their portions, only to discover that it was butter after all. As similar incidents have occurred in many other establishments it is suggested that margarine should in future be dyed scarlet or blue in order to prevent a repetition of these embarrassing contretemps.

The history of the butter/Oleomargarine wars is actually pretty interesting and somewhat bizarre.
http://mentalfloss.com/article/25638/surprisingly-interesting-history-margarine

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #309 on: January 12, 2016, 03:47:39 PM »
This one made me laugh.  I can just see those poor French guys.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #310 on: January 12, 2016, 04:05:13 PM »
On this day a patent was filed for the "Ice Cream Wagon"

https://www.google.com/patents/US1185195

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #311 on: January 12, 2016, 04:09:31 PM »
You can now read the latest
 issue of London's "Punch" magazine, that has just been printed up, a hundred years ago, today.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/22672/22672-h/22672-h.htm


Very cool!  I like the mention of "anti-Zepp curtains".  I saw a fantastic documentary on those Zeppelin raids.  They sometimes flew above the clouds, navigated by a poor fellow dangling in a tiny pod below with a telephone.



Quote
I did not see the preparations, but they must have been bungled somewhere. When the airship had reached a sufficient height Strasser got into the little car and gave the signal which would lower it a half mile below the ship. About 300 feet down, while the winch was allowing the cable to unwind slowly but steadily, the tail of the car became entangled with the wireless aerial. It caught the car and tilted it upside down. The cable meanwhile continued unwinding from the winch above and was beginning to dangle in a slack loop below Strasser, who only saved himself from being tipped out by clinging to the sides of the car with a deathlike grip. Suddenly the aerial gave way, sending the car and Strasser plunging down until it brought up at the end of its own cable with a sickening jolt. It was not a propitious introduction for the new device.

Quote
Despite the isolation of the bomb shaped spy basket, it was found to be a crew favorite, being the only place on the hydrogen filled airships where smoking was allowed.

Images like this give me the willies, for no particularly good reason:

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #312 on: January 12, 2016, 04:52:43 PM »
Here's the Zeppelin documentary:

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #313 on: January 12, 2016, 04:58:47 PM »
Great stuff on the Zepps, K.  I remember reading a WWI book on them.  The Germans were making regular bombing runs over England and the British pilots were having problems with their bullets bouncing off the gas bag.  Until, of course, the exploding bullet was developed.  There was one German officer who was aboard one of the less fortunate zepps that received a mortal hit.  It started to plunge at an alarming rate and all on board knew what awaited them. According to the officer, they all gathered together and calmly shook each others hands, telling each other what a pleasure it had been to have known each other.  The German officer was actually thrown clear on impact, and survived the fall.  Hardly anybody survived being in a plummeting zeppelin. 


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #314 on: January 12, 2016, 05:04:36 PM »
1916  CASTLE SQUARE HOTEL   BOSTON MASS   POSTCARD MAILED

mailed on july 18 1916

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #315 on: January 12, 2016, 05:11:38 PM »
Great stuff on the Zepps, K.  I remember reading a WWI book on them.  The Germans were making regular bombing runs over England and the British pilots were having problems with their bullets bouncing off the gas bag.  Until, of course, the exploding bullet was developed.  There was one German officer who was aboard one of the less fortunate zepps that received a mortal hit.  It started to plunge at an alarming rate and all on board knew what awaited them. According to the officer, they all gathered together and calmly shook each others hands, telling each other what a pleasure it had been to have known each other.  The German officer was actually thrown clear on impact, and survived the fall.  Hardly anybody survived being in a plummeting zeppelin. 



Fantastic story!  They were made of sterner stuff back then.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #316 on: January 12, 2016, 05:23:34 PM »
Ruth Benerito was born on January 12th, 1916.  She was a chemist who ended up in the National Inventors Hall of Fame with 55 patents to her name.  Her work was key in the development of wash and wear cotton fabrics.  She just died in 2013 - almost made it to 100.

http://www.chemheritage.org/discover/online-resources/chemistry-in-history/themes/petrochemistry-and-synthetic-polymers/synthetic-polymers/benerito.aspx

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #317 on: January 12, 2016, 07:37:05 PM »
On January 12, 1916  Officer Roy Thornton of the Dallas Police Department was cut down by a shot gun blast while making an arrest.
Thornton had only been on the force two years - his badge number was #115.




Here are a few more details

Quote
Officer Roy Thornton was shot and killed while arresting a man for a misdemeanor. Another officer arrived and asked if he needed help. At the same moment a friend of the arrestee arrived and opened fire with a 10 gauge shotgun, striking both officers. Officer Thornton was killed and the other officer was wounded. The man escaped and was never captured.

Officer Thornton had been with the agency for two years and was survived by his wife. He is buried in Provence Cemetery east of Ardmore, Oklahoma.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #318 on: January 12, 2016, 07:42:05 PM »
Extract from the Seattle School Board minutes for today, and a related item from a Salem, OR newspaper.  The Pledge of Allegiance was still pretty new (1892).

The admiral has forgotten the Civil War in his list -- maybe too recent and painful?  If only he knew what was coming.

It's not as shocking as it sounds that teachers or anyone else might have been objected to the Pledge in 1916, because it was written by a socialist, and at the time did not mention the United States.  That reference was added in 1923.  It wasn't officially adopted by Congress until 1942, and "under God" wasn't added until 1954 due to pressure primarily from the Knights of Columbus. 


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #319 on: January 12, 2016, 07:43:38 PM »
This one made me laugh.  I can just see those poor French guys.

Especially when the dogs just sat there mocking them with their big doggie grins!

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #320 on: January 12, 2016, 07:44:15 PM »
It's not as shocking as it sounds that teachers or anyone else might have been objected to the Pledge in 1916, because it was written by a socialist, and at the time did not mention the United States.  That reference was added in 1923.  It wasn't officially adopted by Congress until 1942, and "under God" wasn't added until 1954 due to pressure primarily from the Knights of Columbus.
And lest we recall the "roman salute" portion of the day!

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #321 on: January 12, 2016, 07:45:32 PM »
On this day a patent was filed for the "Ice Cream Wagon"

https://www.google.com/patents/US1185195

I wonder if a sound system for playing "Turkey in the Straw" and "La Cucuracha" was included in the patent.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #322 on: January 12, 2016, 08:28:47 PM »
I wonder if a sound system for playing "Turkey in the Straw" and "La Cucuracha" was included in the patent.

I wish they would play those tunes today.  I get a little tired of hearing "Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head" over and over during the Summer months.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #323 on: January 12, 2016, 08:34:47 PM »
I wish they would play those tunes today.  I get a little tired of hearing "Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head" over and over during the Summer months.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #324 on: January 12, 2016, 08:46:21 PM »


Hey, thanks there Walks.  A right cheerful tune,  Is that Archie Campbell's dad playing the jug?




Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #325 on: January 12, 2016, 08:53:13 PM »
Almost 1916 so I thru it into the thread.  Justice cometh for Danny Deever:




Quote
‘What are the bugles blowin’ for?' said Files-on-Parade.   
‘To turn you out, to turn you out,’ the Colour-Sergeant said.
‘What makes you look so white, so white?’ said Files-on-Parade.
‘I’m dreadin’ what I’ve got to watch,’ the Colour-Sergeant said.
      For they’re hangin’ Danny Deever, you can hear the Dead March play,
      The Regiment’s in ’ollow square—they’re hangin’ him to-day;
      They’ve taken of his buttons off an’ cut his stripes away,
      An’ they're hangin’ Danny Deever in the mornin’.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #326 on: January 12, 2016, 09:33:45 PM »
And lest we recall the "roman salute" portion of the day!

Thanks for the reminder! 


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #327 on: January 12, 2016, 09:36:29 PM »
I wish they would play those tunes today.  I get a little tired of hearing "Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head" over and over during the Summer months.

They're better than "Raindrops," but believe me, you'd be tired of hearing those other songs year after year if you lived where I do!

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #328 on: January 12, 2016, 09:42:26 PM »
Almost 1916 so I thru it into the thread.  Justice cometh for Danny Deever:



Cool!  That is remarkably good sound.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #329 on: January 13, 2016, 04:31:23 AM »
This from the Cornell Alumni News Vol. 18, No. 15 (January 13, 1916)

A curious conjunction of events this winter is that of Farmers' Week and Junior Week, which will both come between February 7 and February 12. Nobody can remember that this ever happened before. The town is likely to be somewhat crowded. The authorities of the College of Agriculture are anticipating a large attendance, perhaps five thousand, for Farmers' Week, and have been inquiring about the possibility of finding rooms and board for so many. It will be an amusing week for the farmers. Some of them will get curious ideas about the night life of a university.

And this...

Senator Theodore E. Burton was a guest and speaker at a recent luncheon of the Northeastern Ohio Cornell Association
in Cleveland. His talk was for the most part a recommendation of the public service as a career for university graduates. He said that on a recent trip in South America he heard Cornell University spoken of in the highest terms. "Cornell," he said, "is the best known university in South America."



Senator Theodore E. Burton.  December 20, 1851 - October 28, 1929 (aged 77)

https://ecommons.cornell.edu/bitstream/handle/1813/26389/018_15.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y