Author Topic: Winter Holiday Thread  (Read 45196 times)

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Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #420 on: December 10, 2016, 01:32:11 PM »
peeling a mandarin orange brings a flood of Xmas memories, so lovely!

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #421 on: December 10, 2016, 01:37:10 PM »
I started this tradition with my children and always thought it was in keeping with the St Nicholas story, but I found some other worthy reasons for the custom.
http://www.thekitchn.com/heres-why-we-put-oranges-in-stockings-at-christmas-holiday-traditions-from-the-kitchn-213985

Yes!  They go in the toe of the stocking to give it a pleasing roundness.  Mom had some beautiful ones last time I was over -- satsumas nearly as big as an orange, with wonderful flavor.

Also used to visit grandparents in southern California every few years for Christmas -- they lived near enough to an orchard that the intoxicating scent drove us outside.

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #422 on: December 10, 2016, 03:28:47 PM »
Here's a touching Christmas story I loved when I was a child, "Juggler of Our Lady" is the version I remember. It's based on a medieval legend.

Quote from: wikipedia.org
Le Jongleur de Notre Dame is a religious miracle story by the French author Anatole France, published in 1892 and based on an old medieval legend. Similar to the later Christmas carol The Little Drummer Boy, it tells the story of a juggler turned monk who has no gift to offer a statue of the Virgin Mary except for his ability to juggle well. Upon doing so, he is accused of blasphemy by the other monks, but the statue comes to life and blesses the juggler. It was made into an opera by composer Jules Massenet in 1902 (see Le jongleur de Notre-Dame), but "straight" dramatic versions have also been produced.



Another version with Boris Karloff  as narrator for a cartoon based on the legend.





Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #423 on: December 10, 2016, 03:50:18 PM »
We need more Christmas music!  :)



Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #424 on: December 10, 2016, 04:25:01 PM »
Here is another "Juggler" show, Pye.  I'm kind of surprised to see it on Youtube, as I looked it up some years ago and could only find one vhs copy that somebody wanted 69 dollars for.  Too rich for my blood, haha.  Anyway, it's an extremely heartwarming tale for anyone with 49 minutes on their hands.  Barnaby the Juggler had been in a circus with his acrobat wife, until tragedy struck.  The story kind of takes off from there.  Beautifully filmed at San Juan Capistrano. 


Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #425 on: December 10, 2016, 05:30:05 PM »
Here is another "Juggler" show, Pye.  I'm kind of surprised to see it on Youtube, as I looked it up some years ago and could only find one vhs copy that somebody wanted 69 dollars for.  Too rich for my blood, haha.  Anyway, it's an extremely heartwarming tale for anyone with 49 minutes on their hands.  Barnaby the Juggler had been in a circus with his acrobat wife, until tragedy struck.  The story kind of takes off from there.  Beautifully filmed at San Juan Capistrano. 

Thank you, Rix Gins.  I've never seen this version. :)

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #426 on: December 10, 2016, 06:23:49 PM »
Here's a touching Christmas story I loved when I was a child, "Juggler of Our Lady" is the version I remember. It's based on a medieval legend.

Thank you Pye and Rix, I don't think I've heard of this one before.  Cool story and films.

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #427 on: December 10, 2016, 06:36:11 PM »
Here's a touching Christmas story I loved when I was a child, "Juggler of Our Lady" is the version I remember. It's based on a medieval legend.



Another version with Boris Karloff  as narrator for a cartoon based on the legend.

Andy AND then Boris?!? Both of my favorite actors ever? Wow. Thanks for posting.

Warning/Alert: I mentioned before but the LED lights cheap bought on Amazon still have too much "blue" in them- as I predicted- but why not try? Some people say the LEDs improving etc but they still aren't "white." (Maybe the more expensive ones are?) You spend a lot on a big tree, why cheapen it with lights that are not good? Not sure the tech but this happens in other LED applications. Not sure why.


Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #428 on: December 10, 2016, 07:25:08 PM »
Always happy to share!  :-*

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #429 on: December 10, 2016, 08:31:57 PM »
We need more Christmas music!



Happy to oblige, noble P-Dubya!

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #430 on: December 10, 2016, 11:20:28 PM »
I don't know if many are familiar with the older carols. This one dates back to the Renaissance era and is based on a Middle English poem now known as Corpus Christi Carol. It has been altered over the centuries and survives in the folk tradition as the Christmas carol Down In Yon Forest.

This carol has a haunting quality in it's simplicity and the way these artists interpret the song.

Here are two versions.



Down in yon forest there stands a hall:
The bells of Paradise I heard them ring:
It's covered all over with purple and pall
And I love my Lord Jesus above anything.

In that hall there stands a bed:
The bells of Paradise I heard them ring:
It's covered all over with scarlet so red:
And I love my Lord Jesus above anything.

At the bed-side there lies a stone:
The bells of Paradise I heard them ring:
Which the sweet Virgin Mary knelt upon:
And I love my Lord Jesus above anything.

Under that bed there runs a flood:
The bells of Paradise I heard them ring:
The one half runs water, the other runs blood:
And I love my Lord Jesus above anything.

At the bed's foot there grows a thorn:
The bells of Paradise I heard them ring:
Which ever blows blossom since he was born:
And I love my Lord Jesus above anything.

Over that bed the moon shines bright:
The bells of Paradise I heard them ring:
Denoting our Saviour was born this night:
And I love my Lord Jesus above anything.




Down in yon forest be a hall
Sing May Queen May sing Mary
'Tis is coverleted over with purple and pall
Sing all good men for the new born baby

Oh, in that hall is a pallet-bed
Sing May Queen May sing Mary
'Tis stained with blood like cardinal-red
Sing all good men for the new born baby

And at that pallet is a stone
Sing May Queen May sing Mary
On which the virgin did atone
Sing all good men for the new born baby

Under that hall is a gushing flood
Sing May Queen May sing Mary
- From Christ's own side, 'tis water and blood
Sing all good men for the new born baby

Beside that bed a shrub-tree grows
Sing May Queen May sing Mary
Since he was born it blooms and blows
Sing all good men for the new born baby

Oh, on that bed a young squire sleeps
Sing May Queen May sing Mary
His wounds are sick and sick, he weeps
Sing all good men for the new born baby

Oh, hail yon hall where none can sin
Sing May Queen May sing Mary
'Cause it's gold outside and silver within
Sing all good men for the new born baby

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #431 on: December 10, 2016, 11:27:08 PM »
Happy to oblige, noble P-Dubya!

Thank you, pate- that made me laugh.  ;D

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #432 on: December 12, 2016, 12:07:28 PM »
I have fond memories of our Sicilian branch of the family and the colorful culture they brought from the 'old country'.

Christmas Eve was the traditional time to teach other family members how to preform the ritual to determine if you have the malocchio. I've gotten to see this on a few occasions and loved they way nonna would preserve and pass down their traditions.


Quote from: rickzullo.com
The malocchio can be sent to you either deliberately or inadvertently by someone who envies your position or your good fortune.  Or even your Prada shoes.  Basically, anyone with evil intentions can “curse” you without meaning to—and this includes yourself.  Yes, the dreaded self-inflicted malocchio is the cruelest of all.  Never forget that your thoughts carry weight and can send evil energy back to you like some sort of cosmic boomerang.

But how do you know if you truly have the malocchio?  And what should you do if, god forbid, you discover that you’ve been cursed?

The indications are diverse and can often mimic actual medical conditions.  If you seem to be suffering from a streak of bad luck, prone to frequent accidents, and/or have unexplained headaches in the middle of your forehead, along with dizziness, nausea, and fatigue, then you may be caught in the grip of a malocchio.  Either that, or you just need to cut down on the grappa.

But if the grappa theory doesn’t apply to you, then it’s probably best to consider whether these symptoms could be the result of a real illness, so go see a doctor.  However, if the doctor is unable to diagnose your condition, then for sure you’ve been stricken by a malocchio.

Well friends, at great personal risk, I’m about to reveal the secrets of the malocchio to the English-speaking world.  If you don’t see my regular blog posts from this day on, you can assume that divine retribution has been swift and harsh.  I can only hope that my sacrifice will not be in vain.

And if you’re concerned about your own safety, then it might be best to stop reading this article right now and go back to sharing banal “self-help” quotes on your Facebook profile.  But for those whose curiosity is stronger than their common sense, read on!

Now remember, this ability can only be acquired on Christmas Eve, so plan ahead as you’ll need to gather a few supplies—not the least of which is an Italian grandmother.  She doesn’t have to be your grandmother, but she must be someone’s grandmother.  And she must be Italian—and Catholic, of course.

You’ll also need a dish made from silver, a pair of scissors, some holy water, iodized salt, and extra virgin olive oil.  The good news is that if you discover that you don’t have the malocchio, at least you’ll have most of the ingredients that you’ll need for a nice lunch. And the grandmother will be there to cook it for you, too.
Lu Malocchio se n’ pozza ye!

OK, here we go.  Are you nervous?

First we have to determine if you indeed have the malocchio.  Fill the dish with holy water then make the sign of the cross on yourself three times.  Place your little finger in the olive oil and drip it into the dish, making the sign of the cross with it as you do so.  If the drops merge to form a circle of oil and it gets larger (spreads out), then you, my friend, have been infected by the evil eye.  Don’t worry, help is imminent.

So here it is, the moment you’ve all been waiting for.  The cure.

Take the scissors and cut the air over your dish of oily/holy water.  Then make the sign of the cross over the dish three times while saying (with your best Neapolitan accent):

“Mmidia e malocchio
curnucille all`occhio
crepa l`ammidia, e scoppia lu malocchio!
N’ nome di Di e d’ Santa Mari
lu malocchio se n’ pozza ye!
Lunedi Santo, Martedi Santo, Mercoledi Santo,Giovedi Santo, Venerdi
Santo, Sabato Santo, e Domenica di Pasqua, lu malocchio crepa!”
Envy and the evil eye
keep your horns within your eyesight.
Death to envy, and may the evil eye explode!
In the name of God and Holy Mary
may the evil eye go away!
Holy Monday, Holy Tuesday, Holy Wednesday, Holy Thursday, Holy Friday, Holy Saturday,
and to Easter Sunday, the evil eye dies!
 

Pour the salt in, making the sign of the cross three times.  Take the scissors and cut into the water, again making the sign of the cross. Pour the water out and repeat the entire procedure two more times.

Congratulations, you are now free from the curse!
Italian superstions

Le corna

http://rickzullo.com/the-evil-eye-and-italian-superstitions/ 

This isn't the same ritual I've seen but it will give you an idea of how it's done. I imagine each region has their own way.



This, Midnight Mass, the fabulous food and the platter of Italian pastries/cookies made for many a memorable Christmas Eve.  :) 

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #433 on: December 12, 2016, 12:19:09 PM »
Now we need some Italian music to set the mood.  :)



From the sublime to a boisterous sing along song.  ;D


Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #434 on: December 12, 2016, 02:28:57 PM »
Sometimes it's hard to stay in the Christmas spirit. Just ask Aunt Chippy.  ;D


Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #435 on: December 12, 2016, 02:32:25 PM »
I have fond memories of our Sicilian branch of the family and the colorful culture they brought from the 'old country'.

Christmas Eve was the traditional time to teach other family members how to preform the ritual to determine if you have the malocchio. I've gotten to see this on a few occasions and loved they way nonna would preserve and pass down their traditions.

This, Midnight Mass, the fabulous food and the platter of Italian pastries/cookies made for many a memorable Christmas Eve.  :)

Oh that is fun!  I would love to try, but who has a silver bowl these days?

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #436 on: December 12, 2016, 03:00:51 PM »
Hi there, Pye.  Did the Italians ever happen to make a holiday cake made out of scrambled eggs?  I had a dream some months back where I did a good deed and was presented with a perfect, round cake made out of scrambled eggs.  It almost sounds like it would work as a midnight mass treat, I know I'd give it a try.  Anyway, here is a song by one of my favorite Italian singers.


Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #437 on: December 12, 2016, 04:40:07 PM »
Oh that is fun!  I would love to try, but who has a silver bowl these days?

I'll ask my gypsy friends.  ;) In nonna's ritual- she had to turn her head, and from behind her hand 'spit' three times over her left (IIRC) shoulder- ptu-ptu-ptu  ;D

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #438 on: December 12, 2016, 04:47:12 PM »
Hi there, Pye.  Did the Italians ever happen to make a holiday cake made out of scrambled eggs?  I had a dream some months back where I did a good deed and was presented with a perfect, round cake made out of scrambled eggs.  It almost sounds like it would work as a midnight mass treat, I know I'd give it a try.  Anyway, here is a song by one of my favorite Italian singers.

Thanks, Rix- Dino's one of my favorites, too. Don't forget Mario Lanza!

Did you mean Torta Rustica?

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/12562/torta-rustica/

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #439 on: December 12, 2016, 05:24:57 PM »
Thanks, Rix- Dino's one of my favorites, too. Don't forget Mario Lanza!

Did you mean Torta Rustica?

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/12562/torta-rustica/

I'm pretty sure that it was solid scrambled eggs, through and through, though I don't know if such a thing is possible...a scrambled egg cake.  Haha  As a matter of fact, K D asked me if I had bitten into the cake, and I did not, which is a surprise because I love eggs, even when I'm dreaming.  Great recipe!  Thanks so much.

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #440 on: December 12, 2016, 05:43:05 PM »
I'm pretty sure that it was solid scrambled eggs, through and through, though I don't know if such a thing is possible...a scrambled egg cake.  Haha  As a matter of fact, K D asked me if I had bitten into the cake, and I did not, which is a surprise because I love eggs, even when I'm dreaming.  Great recipe!  Thanks so much.

That was a fascinating dream, Rix.  I'm under the impression that Christmas Eve was traditionally a Catholic fast day -- were eggs excluded? -- so a rich protein dish after Mass would make sense.  Could it have been a type of soufflé?  They are very round, can be quite rich, are sort of scrambled, and are quite festive.

Not necessarily related, but if you are ever in a Japanese grocery and see some of these imported cakes, they are incredible!  Not impressive-looking, but are a cross between a soufflé and a cheesecake, steamed, with an unbelievable, velvety texture:


Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #441 on: December 12, 2016, 06:25:31 PM »
That was a fascinating dream, Rix.  I'm under the impression that Christmas Eve was traditionally a Catholic fast day -- were eggs excluded? -- so a rich protein dish after Mass would make sense.  Could it have been a type of soufflé?  They are very round, can be quite rich, are sort of scrambled, and are quite festive.

Not necessarily related, but if you are ever in a Japanese grocery and see some of these imported cakes, they are incredible!  Not impressive-looking, but are a cross between a soufflé and a cheesecake, steamed, with an unbelievable, velvety texture:


Here you go from our Christmas party, K_Dubb. My crappy phone and lighting was bad so pic not that great. The ones I took of the other desserts, lefse, etc didn't come out at all due to the flash.

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #442 on: December 12, 2016, 06:33:19 PM »
Here you go from our Christmas party, K_Dubb. My crappy phone and lighting was bad so pic not that great. The ones I took of the other desserts, lefse, etc didn't come out at all due to the flash.

Beautiful krumkake and a fyrstekake, too!  Grandma used to make those, but she was an early health nut and ground her own almonds, used raw sugar and whole-wheat flour so it wasn't particularly appealing to us kids.  It sat untouched at the end of the table one year, and she called down to my dad, in her thick accent, "------!  Don't bring shame on my cake!"

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #443 on: December 12, 2016, 06:46:48 PM »
Looking at that Japanese cake I first thought it to be Flan.  It sure would be nice to try it if I ever come across a Japanese grocery store.
When it comes to Christmas sweets I generally have a soft spot for Germanic goods. However, that doesn't extend to Stollen, which I have never enjoyed.

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #444 on: December 12, 2016, 06:52:30 PM »
Looking at that Japanese cake I first thought it to be Flan.  It sure would be nice to try it if I ever come across a Japanese grocery store.
When it comes to Christmas sweets I generally have a soft spot for Germanic goods. However, that doesn't extend to Stollen, which I have never enjoyed.

The stollen I've tried here vary enormously in quality; I'm disappointed in well over half of the ones I buy, even the imported ones.  But the rare good one makes me try over and over.  I've entirely given up on panettone.

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #445 on: December 12, 2016, 07:05:59 PM »
Beautiful krumkake and a fyrstekake, too!  Grandma used to make those, but she was an early health nut and ground her own almonds, used raw sugar and whole-wheat flour so it wasn't particularly appealing to us kids.  It sat untouched at the end of the table one year, and she called down to my dad, in her thick accent, "------!  Don't bring shame on my cake!"

Your memory post is wonderful, K. It is a beautiful centerpiece in the Winter Holiday thread.

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #446 on: December 12, 2016, 07:17:00 PM »
Your memory post is wonderful, K. It is a beautiful centerpiece in the Winter Holiday thread.

Oh thank you, Rix; she was a formidable lady, very much still with us in spirit.

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #447 on: December 12, 2016, 07:18:56 PM »
Beautiful krumkake and a fyrstekake, too!  Grandma used to make those, but she was an early health nut and ground her own almonds, used raw sugar and whole-wheat flour so it wasn't particularly appealing to us kids.  It sat untouched at the end of the table one year, and she called down to my dad, in her thick accent, "------!  Don't bring shame on my cake!"
Ha. But serious it is true. Simply ignoring or just wolfing-down something that someone took a lot of time and care to make isn't good. Trying to make certain deserts healthy, as your Grandma did, sort of defeats the purpose, me thinks. I don't have a big sweet tooth though except for certain things especially almond flavored stuff. That and pecan pie is my weakness. Otherwise I'd just rather and a second helping of the main meat dish. Alas I cannot claim credit for making them- just enjoying them. Somehow some came up with some cloudberries and made a nice cloudberry sauce. Smaller group than you get up in your neck of the woods but fun.
ps: I thought that Japanese cake also looked like Flan.

Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #448 on: December 12, 2016, 07:34:18 PM »
Ha. But serious it is true. Simply ignoring or just wolfing-down something that someone took a lot of time and care to make isn't good. Trying to make certain deserts healthy, as your Grandma did, sort of defeats the purpose, me thinks. I don't have a big sweet tooth though except for certain things especially almond flavored stuff. That and pecan pie is my weakness. Otherwise I'd just rather and a second helping of the main meat dish. Alas I cannot claim credit for making them- just enjoying them. Somehow some came up with some cloudberries and made a nice cloudberry sauce. Smaller group than you get up in your neck of the woods but fun.
ps: I thought that Japanese cake also looked like Flan.

Yeah when I think of all the burnt julekaker and soggy fattigmenn I passed up as a selfish, unfeeling kid, I could almost cry -- just to have those good old ladies back again.  But here's a Scandy-American classic to cheer us up:


Re: Winter Holiday Thread
« Reply #449 on: December 12, 2016, 07:47:31 PM »
For Pye, fattigmannbakkels are basically angel-wings; I wonder if your family made them: