Author Cooking With Chefist!  (Read 38607 times)

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Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #600 on: November 19, 2018, 04:12:43 PM »
I was told I was narcissistic for starting this thread...LOL
Thats fake news Chefist. What are you cooking for thanksgiving chefist? Are you going to do a special podcast for cooking with chefist for thanksgiving?

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #601 on: November 19, 2018, 04:29:14 PM »
I was told I was narcissistic for starting this thread...LOL

Nah, that's them sick fuckin weirdo fetishists that take all them selfies.


Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #602 on: November 19, 2018, 04:54:41 PM »
Thats fake news Chefist. What are you cooking for thanksgiving chefist? Are you going to do a special podcast for cooking with chefist for thanksgiving?

Hey Damon... long time. That might be a good idea...fire up the old blog talk. .

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #603 on: November 19, 2018, 05:00:03 PM »
Hey Damon... long time. That might be a good idea...fire up the old blog talk. .
Live broadcast dropping a frozen turkey into pot full of boiling peanut oil....just as a public service safety announcement.  ;)

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #604 on: November 19, 2018, 05:02:04 PM »
Food good! 🤤







Oh yeah! Almost looks like a poutine burger there, Weiner.

Hey, still seeing your feet = A OK!


Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #605 on: November 19, 2018, 05:06:38 PM »
I was told I was narcissistic for starting this thread...LOL

A new business venture?

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #606 on: November 19, 2018, 06:40:16 PM »
I want to see Chefist cooking up some cat fajitas.


Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #607 on: November 19, 2018, 07:04:30 PM »
Well...since you asked....


Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #608 on: November 19, 2018, 07:16:45 PM »
I want to see Chefist cooking up some cat fajitas.
Pretty sure I actually had those once decades ago in Ol' Mexico. Regretfully....

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #609 on: November 23, 2018, 12:07:35 PM »
I was in charge of sweet potatoes this year, from which you may infer the relative appreciation of my cooking skill among those who know me best.  Since I don't believe one should spring an innovation on one's family on this of all days, I made half using the traditional simple butter-and-brown-sugar we favor and made the rest as a variation on gratin dauphinoise:  sliced thin, well salted and spiced (mace, cinnamon, pinch of cloves), covered in heavy cream, dusted with buttered breadcrumbs, and baked until bubbly, brown, and crisp on top.

This resulted in a dish which was superior in every way, but people still like the original.  Though here, too, I changed the preparation a little while using the same three ingredients.  The problem with the method I learned from my mom is that, while the top layer of the dish is always deliciously browned and the fought-over corners blackened, the bottom is invariably soggy and resembles nothing more than yams from a can.  I solved this by pre-baking the sliced yams in single layers in two baking dishes until soft and beginning to brown (essentially dehydrating them), then carefully tossing the slices in the melted butter and brown sugar, re-arranging them in single layers, and baking until each slice had an equal portion of that delicious brown glaze which, amazingly, survived an hour's journey and the indignity of reheating in a crock pot.  People loved it.

Perhaps next year I can be entrusted with the gravy which, invariably, leaves much to be desired.  I don't know where the idea of gravy as simply a wet thing to be poured over meat, susceptible to augmentation by whatever canned soups you happen to have on hand, comes from, but it must be driven out of the family.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #610 on: November 23, 2018, 01:28:07 PM »
...

Perhaps next year I can be entrusted with the gravy which, invariably, leaves much to be desired.  I don't know where the idea of gravy as simply a wet thing to be poured over meat, susceptible to augmentation by whatever canned soups you happen to have on hand, comes from, but it must be driven out of the family.

You will want to make or acquire a good demi-glace for your "gravy."  Then you will be making a sauce rather than a common gravy.  If you make this stuff yourself it will increase your T-day prep time considerably.  Were I doing this I would try an experiment:  make the demi-glace with turkey stock rather than veal and brown stock.  Technically, I guess you can make brown stock out of whatever you want.  If you haven't thrown out the Turkey carcass yet those bones would probably work fairly well to make your turkey stock for a non-traditional demi-glace.  Demi-glace freezes quite well, I find.

My sister was arguing with me about frozen stuff incidentally at the T-day table this year.  She claimed that "freezer burnt" items have a "freezer burned flavor,"  I disagreed.  I have some freezer burnt demi-glace that I made years ago, and I think it tastes fine.  Essentially, it is freeze dried somewhat now, but it melts down and mixes right back together and I really do not notice a flavor difference.  Now if you are taking a steak or something that is freezer burnt and grilling it, yes there will be a difference.  But using freezer-burnt bones/vegetables to make a stock?  No effect on the flavor, I would expect the flavors to be concentrated even more.  I digress.

You should totally tackle the gravy process for next year, take the turkey carcass from this year and turn it into stock for next year.  If you are worried about freezer-burn maybe you have one of those vacuum-pack bag things you can put it in to minimize the freezer burn.  Turkey Demi-Glace sounds interesting, you could use it for other stuff too.  When I made my demi-glace a few years ago I froze it in ice cube trays, then bagged it up in zip-locks.  Each "ice cube" was about 2 Tablespoons worth of demiglace, perfect for chucking into random dishes to kick it up a notch.  The ice cubes would probably not freezer burn as much if I had one of those vacuum-bag thing, but like I said I noticed no flavor/texture effect from the freezer burn.

I would use Sage instead of Parsley in the sachet for a turkey stock, especially if the goal was to use the final demi-glace for holiday themed meals.

Who wants common gravy on their turkey/stuffing when you can have a sauce?  A sauce that is not "cranberry sauce" anyway.



Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #611 on: November 23, 2018, 01:51:15 PM »
You will want to make or acquire a good demi-glace for your "gravy."  Then you will be making a sauce rather than a common gravy.  If you make this stuff yourself it will increase your T-day prep time considerably.  Were I doing this I would try an experiment:  make the demi-glace with turkey stock rather than veal and brown stock.  Technically, I guess you can make brown stock out of whatever you want.  If you haven't thrown out the Turkey carcass yet those bones would probably work fairly well to make your turkey stock for a non-traditional demi-glace.  Demi-glace freezes quite well, I find.

My sister was arguing with me about frozen stuff incidentally at the T-day table this year.  She claimed that "freezer burnt" items have a "freezer burned flavor,"  I disagreed.  I have some freezer burnt demi-glace that I made years ago, and I think it tastes fine.  Essentially, it is freeze dried somewhat now, but it melts down and mixes right back together and I really do not notice a flavor difference.  Now if you are taking a steak or something that is freezer burnt and grilling it, yes there will be a difference.  But using freezer-burnt bones/vegetables to make a stock?  No effect on the flavor, I would expect the flavors to be concentrated even more.  I digress.

You should totally tackle the gravy process for next year, take the turkey carcass from this year and turn it into stock for next year.  If you are worried about freezer-burn maybe you have one of those vacuum-pack bag things you can put it in to minimize the freezer burn.  Turkey Demi-Glace sounds interesting, you could use it for other stuff too.  When I made my demi-glace a few years ago I froze it in ice cube trays, then bagged it up in zip-locks.  Each "ice cube" was about 2 Tablespoons worth of demiglace, perfect for chucking into random dishes to kick it up a notch.  The ice cubes would probably not freezer burn as much if I had one of those vacuum-bag thing, but like I said I noticed no flavor/texture effect from the freezer burn.

I would use Sage instead of Parsley in the sachet for a turkey stock, especially if the goal was to use the final demi-glace for holiday themed meals.

Who wants common gravy on their turkey/stuffing when you can have a sauce?  A sauce that is not "cranberry sauce" anyway.



Thank you, dear pate!  I was hoping a kind someone would point me in the right direction.  I rescued the entire carcass (including the giblets which, naturally, were discarded as superfluous, ugh) from my aunt.  This will be quite an adventure!

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #612 on: November 23, 2018, 01:55:45 PM »
I was in charge of sweet potatoes this year, from which you may infer the relative appreciation of my cooking skill among those who know me best.  Since I don't believe one should spring an innovation on one's family on this of all days, I made half using the traditional simple butter-and-brown-sugar we favor and made the rest as a variation on gratin dauphinoise:  sliced thin, well salted and spiced (mace, cinnamon, pinch of cloves), covered in heavy cream, dusted with buttered breadcrumbs, and baked until bubbly, brown, and crisp on top.

This resulted in a dish which was superior in every way, but people still like the original.  Though here, too, I changed the preparation a little while using the same three ingredients.  The problem with the method I learned from my mom is that, while the top layer of the dish is always deliciously browned and the fought-over corners blackened, the bottom is invariably soggy and resembles nothing more than yams from a can.  I solved this by pre-baking the sliced yams in single layers in two baking dishes until soft and beginning to brown (essentially dehydrating them), then carefully tossing the slices in the melted butter and brown sugar, re-arranging them in single layers, and baking until each slice had an equal portion of that delicious brown glaze which, amazingly, survived an hour's journey and the indignity of reheating in a crock pot.  People loved it.

Perhaps next year I can be entrusted with the gravy which, invariably, leaves much to be desired.  I don't know where the idea of gravy as simply a wet thing to be poured over meat, susceptible to augmentation by whatever canned soups you happen to have on hand, comes from, but it must be driven out of the family.

Fascinating process, bravo on the innovative pre-browning. So this is essentially scalloped potatoes but made with sweet taters. Can you share any proportions? How many taters, how much cream, that sort of thing. I'm guess if it went via crock pot there must have been half a dozen taters and maybe 3/4 cup of cream? Thanks for sharing this. :)

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #613 on: November 23, 2018, 02:28:15 PM »
Fascinating process, bravo on the innovative pre-browning. So this is essentially scalloped potatoes but made with sweet taters. Can you share any proportions? How many taters, how much cream, that sort of thing. I'm guess if it went via crock pot there must have been half a dozen taters and maybe 3/4 cup of cream? Thanks for sharing this. :)

Thanks, I felt very clever!  Sure, there are actually two preparations described above which I will lay out for clarity:

Scalloped yams (not sure if this is the right word; I borrowed the technique from a Swedish Christmas casserole called Janssons Frestelse):

4 yams, peeled and sliced fairly thin, arranged spiral-fashion in a 9-inch cake pan in layers, each layer well-salted
1 1/2 cups of cream, heated and infused with spices to taste (mace, cinnamon, two cloves ground), into which about half a cup of sugar has been dissolved, with a splash of whatever liquor strikes your fancy
Buttered bread crumbs to cover (melt butter and stir in enough breadcrumbs to absorb)

Pour cream over yams in the pan, sprinkle breadcrumbs on top, bake for maybe 45 mins at 425.  It will want to blacken real fast because of the sugar, so keep an eye on the color of the bubbling liquid.

Glazed yams

6-7 yams, sliced thickly
A stick of butter
Maybe 2/3 cup of dark brown sugar
Salt to taste -- maybe half a handful
1/2 cup cream I had left over from above

Arrange slices in a single layer in two baking dishes and bake at 375 for 45 mins until the tops start to brown
Divide the butter, cream, brown sugar, and salt between the hot dishes and, when melted/dissolved, carefully toss the yam slices in it and return to a single layer, pouring off excess glaze
Bake for about another hour until they reach the desired color -- in my case, pretty dark.




Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #614 on: November 23, 2018, 02:49:30 PM »
Thanks K_Dubb, that "clarifies" things for me, sorry  I didn't catch this was 2 dishes at first, the commonality being Yams. I've copy/pasted to the high command for our Christmas spread and it will be interesting to see which one makes the cut. We tend to be sherry people where yams are concerned, the tiny marshmallows having been banished some years back. I think the glazed preparation may win the runoff, but either will be appreciated greatly! :)




Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #615 on: November 23, 2018, 02:54:18 PM »
Thanks K_Dubb, that "clarifies" things for me, sorry  I didn't catch this was 2 dishes at first, the commonality being Yams. I've copy/pasted to the high command for our Christmas spread and it will be interesting to see which one makes the cut. We tend to be sherry people where yams are concerned, the tiny marshmallows having been banished some years back. I think the glazed preparation may win the runoff, but either will be appreciated greatly! :)

You are most welcome!  Sherry will do nicely.  The glazed ones were the clear hit.  I think the spices threw everyone for a loop in the creamy version; tasted like dessert.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #616 on: November 23, 2018, 03:28:50 PM »
Thanks, I felt very clever!  Sure, there are actually two preparations described above which I will lay out for clarity:

Scalloped yams (not sure if this is the right word; I borrowed the technique from a Swedish Christmas casserole called Janssons Frestelse):

4 yams, peeled and sliced fairly thin, arranged spiral-fashion in a 9-inch cake pan in layers, each layer well-salted
1 1/2 cups of cream, heated and infused with spices to taste (mace, cinnamon, two cloves ground), into which about half a cup of sugar has been dissolved, with a splash of whatever liquor strikes your fancy
Buttered bread crumbs to cover (melt butter and stir in enough breadcrumbs to absorb)

Pour cream over yams in the pan, sprinkle breadcrumbs on top, bake for maybe 45 mins at 425.  It will want to blacken real fast because of the sugar, so keep an eye on the color of the bubbling liquid.

Glazed yams

6-7 yams, sliced thickly
A stick of butter
Maybe 2/3 cup of dark brown sugar
Salt to taste -- maybe half a handful
1/2 cup cream I had left over from above

Arrange slices in a single layer in two baking dishes and bake at 375 for 45 mins until the tops start to brown
Divide the butter, cream, brown sugar, and salt between the hot dishes and, when melted/dissolved, carefully toss the yam slices in it and return to a single layer, pouring off excess glaze
Bake for about another hour until they reach the desired color -- in my case, pretty dark.


What, no Troll Spray?

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #617 on: November 23, 2018, 03:38:21 PM »

What, no Troll Spray?

Too spicy!  :P

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #618 on: November 23, 2018, 04:12:16 PM »
Too spicy!  :P

Love the avatar pic. K.  Were you giving an after Thanksgiving dinner recital?

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #619 on: November 23, 2018, 04:18:23 PM »
Love the avatar pic. K.  Were you giving an after Thanksgiving dinner recital?

Thanks, Rix; we play starting with thanksgiving hymns and finish with Christmas carols.  You can see my dad's sax and aunt's trombone.  Two cousins are there, too, with guitar and autoharp.  It is either play or sing, so the incentive to learn any instrument at all is very high.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #620 on: November 23, 2018, 04:22:56 PM »
It would seem like K_Dubb had a pretty traditional Thanksgiving.   Bet the food was wonderful.  With Little Walks away at school over the holiday, Mrs. Walks decided she wanted to do something different.  So we spent a couple of days prowling some of the uninhabited islands on the coast looking for some of the Carolina wild horses.   Never saw a horse but we had fun anyway.  Certainly a different type of Thanksgiving.    For an added bonus, on the way home today, we stopped by an animal encounter and rescue joint.   Incredibly they have a Kangaroo on the loose, with a stiff warning to leave it alone.   So of course a Chinese guy had to hassle it and got his ass kicked.  Well worth the price of admission......................




Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #621 on: November 26, 2018, 04:55:44 AM »
I was in charge of sweet potatoes this year...

Psh, I sat back and watched the hos cook my shit, nigga. Word.

-Lee

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #622 on: December 11, 2018, 10:47:34 AM »

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #623 on: December 21, 2018, 10:44:35 AM »
After making two batches of marshmallows I can confirm plain gelatin is made from horse hooves.  It smells like a barn until the flavoring goes in.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #624 on: February 12, 2019, 02:30:11 AM »
Apparently at either Christmas or Thanksgiving, while talking about making Meyer Lemon Marmalade the issue of kumquats came up and I said something about making marmalade out of them.  My dear mom understood this to mean that I wanted 14 lbs of kumquats sent up from Louisiana via US mail from a relative or something...

This was a few weeks ago, and when the Polar Vortex came to visit I spent three days making Citrus Marmalade, Kumquat Marmalade and a Kumquat Chutney.

The "Citrus Marmalade" I made from Satsuma Oranges, Meyer Lemons, Kumquats and store bought Limes (MISTAKE on the limes, it looks cool but has a bitterness to it from the lime rinds.  Maybe if I ever make the stuff again, I will try to find Key Limes?  I dunno)

 

* Kumquat1.jpg (520.86 kB)


Still not too bad, that was day 1.

Day 2 I made 100% Kumquat Marmalade.  That took forever too.  Even longer than day 1 because I decided to add more water to the pot for some reason, took forever to cook down to a gel...  I spent that cooking time prepping the stuff for the Chutney.  Deseeding kumquats sucks.

 

 

* Deseed1.jpg (335.48 kB)


 

* Deseed2.jpg (88.25 kB)


Day 3 was chutney day, I added dried apricots and dried cherries and a bunch of other stuff.  Kitchen smelled like Christmas.

 

* Chutney.jpg (487.8 kB)

Kumquat, Cherry & Apricot Chutney

That was probably the best of the batch, I put a chili pepper in there so it has a nice bite.  Goes great on a pork sirloin roast...

 

* Dinner.jpg (413.82 kB)


I just ate that and it's pretty damn good, think I might have a second plate.

All in all I got something like 17 pint jars of kumquat product.  Chutney > Kumquat marmalade > Citrus Marmalade in order of tastyness, although not even the Citrus Marmalade is bad, just a bit bitter need to figure out what to do with a slightly/moderately bitter marmalade...

 

* CitrusMarm.jpg (130.68 kB)

Citrus Marmalade

 

* Marmalade.jpg (469.2 kB)

Kumquat Marmalade


Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #625 on: February 17, 2019, 01:51:53 PM »
That would make some awesome flavored moonshine too!

Add one of these after the thumper keg.



Mmm...good sippin'. :)

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #626 on: February 17, 2019, 03:40:52 PM »
Mmm...good sippin'. :)

More accurate to his reality:


Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #627 on: February 17, 2019, 04:03:06 PM »


https://whatscookingamerica.net/History/RockyMtnOyster.htm
Rocky Mountain Oysters Recipe:

Ingredients:
2 pounds calf testicles*
2 cups beer
2 eggs, beaten
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup yellow cornmeal
Salt and ground black pepper to taste
Vegetable oil**
1 tablespoon hot pepper sauce

* Be sure to ask your butcher for calf testicles, not bull testicles.  Calf testicles are the size of a walnut and are much more tender than the larger bull testicles.

** Use enough vegetable oil to fill your frying container halfway to the top (to allow for bubbling up and splattering) and to completely cover calf testicles while frying.

Instructions:

With a very sharp knife, split the tough skin-like muscle that surrounds each testicle.  Remove the skin (you can remove the skin easily if the testicles are frozen, then peel while thawing).  Either leave whole or slice each testicle into approximately 1/4- to 1/2-inch-thick ovals. 

Rocky Mtn OystersPlace slices in a large pan or blow with enough beer to cover them; cover and let sit 2 hours.

In a shallow bowl, combine eggs, flour, cornmeal, salt, and pepper to make a wet flour dredge or closer to a batter consistency.

Remove testicles from beer; drain and dredge thoroughly in the wet flour dredge.



In a large, deep pot, heat oil to 375 degrees F.  Deep fry 3 minutes or until golden brown (will rise to the surface when done).  Drain on paper towels.

Serve warm with your favorite hot pepper sauce.

 

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #628 on: April 21, 2019, 03:44:27 PM »
Two racks of lamb on the grill, roasted carrots, roasted potatoes, pan roasted green beans and asparagus.  Pitcher of Sangria.  Canít wait to eat.

Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #629 on: May 05, 2019, 06:18:03 PM »
My endorsed spokesman...

https://youtu.be/lzhiM9NXl9Q