Author Topic: Cooking With Chefist!  (Read 27780 times)

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Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #300 on: July 01, 2016, 08:47:21 PM »
hey all..looking for a good simple prep we'll call it for a couple London Broils to be grilled on Sunday

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #301 on: October 02, 2016, 10:55:23 AM »
A cross thread from the "100 Years Ago" and speculation what a bulls head breakfast mentioned in an old newspaper might be. Headcheese maybe spread on bread or biscuits or more like barbacoa. Here is a recipe for that good stuff (and good for hangovers) though made with pork, so I a bit suspicious. Partial to the cow head style.
http://www.banderasnews.com/0506/rr-barbacoa.htm
Here is recipe for headcheese for you old-timers out there. I can eat most things but never got into it.




hey all..looking for a good simple prep we'll call it for a couple London Broils to be grilled on Sunday

Not simple prep for your Sunday in July meal, trostol, but this Soused Hog's Face recipe seems to be an interesting potted meat variation.

I recommend a thyme masheen in addition to the ingredients listed therein for your Sundry and Jolly meal.

-----

To get this thread back on a modern track I intend to can today.  I have a sauerkraut made with a small head of cabbage that split open a month ago due to overwatering, it has been happily rotting away with salt the entire time.  Also, my brother-in-law had an abundance of Jalepeno and Poblano peppers that need to be "dealt" with. 

I intend to slice and preserve (no vinegar, just brine) the Jalepenos.   I might add some sliced carrot rounds and garlic in one of the jars and do a pickling (with vinegar) semi-authentico jar.

The Poblanos I think I shall fire roast and peel and preserve with no flair, perhaps a bit of olive oil?

Also, there are several random peppers that I will pickle whole (Tobasco, Anaheim/banana?) with some baby carrots and whole garlic along with the smaller of the Japeenos 'n Poblanos.



*BellGab's auto-co-wreck'd does not seem to like the way I spelled some peepers, I will live and hope the reader is able to decypher.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #302 on: October 22, 2016, 05:49:08 PM »
Crock pot rice pudding, creamy style, about like Kozy Shack brand.

Cup and a half of white Japanese-style rice (short grain, polished)
Two cups of water
About an inch of butter

Put above in crock pot on high for an hour or so until the rice is cooked.  Break up the rice if it's a clump.  Then add

3 quarts of whole milk
Spices of choice -- currently one vanilla bean split and scraped, one cinnamon stick, and a whole fresh-grated nutmeg (tasts like egg nog)

Cook for another 4 or 5 hours until appreciably thickened and coats the back of a spoon, partially if you want it creamy and not firm.  You can stir once or twice, or beat rapidly with a hand mixer a bit to hasten the process.  You are just breaking down the rice to thicken the milk.

Once thick, fish out remains of spices, beat six eggs a bit with a hand mixer, temper with a ladle-full of the hot pudding, and pour into the pudding while beating with the hand mixer.  Immediately beat in about a cup and a quarter of sugar, or the equivalent fake sugar if you're on a diet -- makes a decently nutritious meal replacement or guiltless dessert.  Cover the surface (touching the pudding all over) with plastic wrap to prevent a skin.  Chill.  I put the whole crock in the fridge.

Eat topped with homemade quince jelly, lingonberries or whatever with a squirt of whipped cream.



Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #303 on: October 22, 2016, 06:18:14 PM »
The pizza soup reminded me of this:  Crock pot shredded pizza chicken

Whole crock pot full of boneless, skinless thighs, maybe 8 or 9 pounds
One can of Hunts tomato paste -- not the little one, one size up
Lots of garlic powder

Cook on low for 6 hours and shred in the liquid, allowing most to re-absorb.  Drain excess.

In a large saucepan, heat three more cans of tomato paste with a whole head of garlic cloves, peeled and smashed, 1/4 cup sugar, lots of salt and pepper, and lots of dried basil and oregano.  I get those cheap packets of each in the Mexican section and use the whole thing.  Tons of oregano = more pizza flavor.  You may prefer to brown the garlic first, but I've found that raw garlic just heated in the sauce tastes more like pizza.  Toss the shredded chicken in this.

Brown a package of sweet italian sausage and cube a package of pepperoni to stir in.

Great hot on a bun with mozzarella or cold for breakfast, just like pizza.


Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #304 on: October 31, 2016, 08:55:10 PM »
Well, I can hardly call this "cooking" compared to the other posters with their pastries and meals but I just cooked up some pumpkin seeds from a carving early (so warm here that, basically, you have to wait to make a Jack O' Latern or it will melt and look nasty, attract bugs, etc.) I did one traditional (just some salt) and one using some of Mexican stuff they use on meats and throw into their beers (sorta of salty, spicy, and with lime.) Both turned out great! I also usually do a Chesapeake Bay seasoning one but didn't have that many seeds this year.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #305 on: November 01, 2016, 12:02:11 AM »
Well, I can hardly call this "cooking" compared to the other posters with their pastries and meals but I just cooked up some pumpkin seeds from a carving early (so warm here that, basically, you have to wait to make a Jack O' Latern or it will melt and look nasty, attract bugs, etc.) I did one traditional (just some salt) and one using some of Mexican stuff they use on meats and throw into their beers (sorta of salty, spicy, and with lime.) Both turned out great! I also usually do a Chesapeake Bay seasoning one but didn't have that many seeds this year.

Sounds good to me.  I love pumpkin seeds.  Especially when they're done like yours.

Remember these as a kid?  It was like eating a salt block.  LOL!


Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #306 on: November 01, 2016, 12:06:29 AM »
Sounds good to me.  I love pumpkin seeds.  Especially when they're done like yours.

Remember these as a kid?  It was like eating a salt block.  LOL!



they were the best!!!!!!

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #307 on: November 01, 2016, 12:07:03 AM »
Sounds good to me.  I love pumpkin seeds.  Especially when they're done like yours.

Remember these as a kid?  It was like eating a salt block.  LOL!


Ha. Thing that weird? I dont like pumpkin pie or new stuff pumpkin coffee, pumpkin beer but love seeds. Probably the salt. But also was introduced to Mexican mole (sauce) that made from pumpkin seeds. Awesome! But got to be fresh.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #308 on: November 01, 2016, 12:18:38 AM »
they were the best!!!!!!
''LOL!  I liked them too as a kid but my tongue was raw after eating a bag.  :P

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #309 on: November 01, 2016, 12:21:02 AM »
Ha. Thing that weird? I dont like pumpkin pie or new stuff pumpkin coffee, pumpkin beer but love seeds. Probably the salt. But also was introduced to Mexican mole (sauce) that made from pumpkin seeds. Awesome! But got to be fresh.

I don't care for pumpkin pie either.  I like Mole sauces.  Never heard of one with pumpkin.  That is intriguing.  You should post a recipe!  :D

Now I want some pumpkin seeds.  Even the ones I posted above.  LOL!

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #310 on: November 01, 2016, 12:34:14 AM »
I don't care for pumpkin pie either.  I like Mole sauces.  Never heard of one with pumpkin.  That is intriguing.  You should post a recipe!  :D

Now I want some pumpkin seeds.  Even the ones I posted above.  LOL!
I think if you look up in this thread (im on phone n hard to do now) you will find some pumpkin.seed mole recipes by Chefist n others when I first mentioned it a while back (some taco place started here by local movie guy Linklater I tried n loved it.) Not like pumpkin pie but seed taste. Awesome.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #311 on: November 01, 2016, 09:15:27 PM »
Crock pot rice pudding, creamy style, about like Kozy Shack brand.

Cup and a half of white Japanese-style rice (short grain, polished)
Two cups of water
About an inch of butter

Put above in crock pot on high for an hour or so until the rice is cooked.  Break up the rice if it's a clump.  Then add

3 quarts of whole milk
Spices of choice -- currently one vanilla bean split and scraped, one cinnamon stick, and a whole fresh-grated nutmeg (tasts like egg nog)

Cook for another 4 or 5 hours until appreciably thickened and coats the back of a spoon, partially if you want it creamy and not firm.  You can stir once or twice, or beat rapidly with a hand mixer a bit to hasten the process.  You are just breaking down the rice to thicken the milk.

Once thick, fish out remains of spices, beat six eggs a bit with a hand mixer, temper with a ladle-full of the hot pudding, and pour into the pudding while beating with the hand mixer.  Immediately beat in about a cup and a quarter of sugar, or the equivalent fake sugar if you're on a diet -- makes a decently nutritious meal replacement or guiltless dessert.  Cover the surface (touching the pudding all over) with plastic wrap to prevent a skin.  Chill.  I put the whole crock in the fridge.

Eat topped with homemade quince jelly, lingonberries or whatever with a squirt of whipped cream.

Sounds interesting, I make a white trash Rice Pudding with regular long-grain rice once in awhile.  Someday, I do intend to get the "proper" rice for it.  You say you use Japenese short-grain?  Is that the same as sushi-rice?  Not Sure.

Anyhow, my experimental investigative quest for the ultimate rice pudding is to go the custard route.  It sort of works with regular long-grain but the texture is off due to the long-grain rice, I intend someday try both sushi-rice and Arborio rice to see which is superior.

I haven't perfected it but it goes something like this:

-------------------------------

-Prepare rice as normal substituting milk for water* use butter for fat do use a bit of salt (to lessen the amount of sugar needed to taste sweet, ever put a little salt on a watermelon?  A little salt for some reason really knocks the sweet taste up with out loading up on sugar, a light touch is key).

-Prepare a basic Heavy Cream & Egg Yolk custard sweetened to taste, mix in appropriate amount of rice & desired spices (I like just nutmeg, and perhaps a bit of vanilla).

-Bake in a moderate oven (350F?) in a water-bath until custard sets.

-Serve warm, or chill and serve cold.





*I don't really have standard recipe for rice:  I fill the pot up with however much rice I want to cook then measure the depth of the rice with the tip of my index finger at the bottom of the pot, and my thumb marking the level of the rice on the side of my finger.  I then put the tip of my index finger on the surface of the dry rice and add water up to my thumb "index-mark," then add salt and fat (un-measured and the fat varies by the dish, I use butter generally, but will use corn-oil/lard for Mexican/Tex-Mex, Peanut oil for Asian, Olive-Oil/butter for Italian etc).  See graphic if that description is confusing.


------------------------------------

Tonight, I might make a test batch of a biscuit recipe I last made as an 8 or 9-yr old.  I wrote the recipe down on post-It notes and hid it somewhere in my mother's cookbooks.  I have been asking her for years to find it, and she finally found it and gave me a few photo-copies of it. 

I have prepared a special batch of pastry flour for this endeavor (because I am cheap, and where the fuck do you get pastry flour???)::;

1 box of Swan's Down Cake flour (which scaled to 920g) mixed with 986g of Hudson's Cream Short Patent (basically AP flour).  Mixed with a whisk for like ten minutes.

I was aiming for a 8.5% pastry flour, Swan's Down 2g protein per 28g (roughly 7.1%) flour & Hudson's 3g protein per 30g (10%) flour, yields a 5/58 or 8.62% so close enough for me.

The recipe is pretty simple (this from memory because I am too lazy to go downstairs at the moment to find it):


--------------------------------------

500F(!?!) oven.
1 cast iron skillet with 1 Tablespoon shortening (I intend to use lard).  Place skillet in oven to heat.

prepare dough:
2 Tablespoons Shortening (26g I believe) LARD, dammit!
2 Cups + 2 Tablespoons Flour (I am using a 116g pastry flour = 1 Cup conversion factor = 130g flour rounded for simplicity)
1/8 tsp Baking Soda (?g says on box dammit!)
1 tsp Baking Powder (?g says on box dammit!)

mix dry ingredients together then cut in Shortening with a pastry knife, until grainy (little grains of sand as Chef used to say)

1/4 Cup buttermilk (?g am going to weigh a 1/4C of buttermilk & see, as the damn jug tells milliters and the specific gravity of buttermilk is not 1.0, dammit!)

just mix buttermilk in until clumps form NO OVERMIXING HEAR!!!, dammit!

Pour mess out onto floured work area (a wooden countertop is best, but whatever), push mess together, roll & fold 3-4 times NO MORE!!!, dammit! (if I have to bust out a Monty Python video about the dangers of 5, so help me...) Make your final sheet of dough about 1/2 inch thick (1.25cm for you blithering idiot dirty foreigners) cut your biscuit rounds.  If you dare you may attempt to press the leftover pieces into as many "extra biscuits" as you like, these extra biscuits will very likely suck.

Remove the now blistering hot cast-iron skillet with the 1 Tablespoon of lard from the 500F(!?!?!) oven, CAREFULLY, don't burn the baby, Rainman! And place the biscuits gently in the hot shortening, Flip the biscuits over, carefully (this browns the top of the biscuit for you).  Then gently throw the cast-iron skillet back in the 500F(!?!?!?!) oven for about 10-12(?) minutes.

Ding biscuits are done, serve warm with mustard.  (makes 6-8 biscuits, which are most certainly not cookies you foul, filthy foreigners!)

--------------------------------

I am sure I used AP flour as a kid when I made these, but I recall and mother agrees that this was the best and easiest biscuit recipe ever (an 8 or 9-yr old child accomplished it, granted it was me a genius 8 or 9-yr old, still...)  Couldn't tell you what shortening I used as a lad, I am sure Crisco (spit).  I am not certain that a 500F oven is correct, but I shall attempt it as written.  500F seems a bit extreme?  I think pastry takes high and dry heat, so maybe.  I was a child genius, surely I wouldn't have gotten a critical detail like that wrong?  I think the size cast-iron skillet is what I call a "standard" or 9". 

Crap it is late, I may not get to this today...

May report later, see below for "rice recipe explanatory graphic"

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #312 on: November 01, 2016, 09:31:14 PM »
Hahaha love the explanatory graphic!

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #313 on: November 01, 2016, 09:43:28 PM »
Crock pot rice pudding, creamy style, about like Kozy Shack brand.

Cup and a half of white Japanese-style rice (short grain, polished)
Two cups of water
About an inch of butter

Put above in crock pot on high for an hour or so until the rice is cooked.  Break up the rice if it's a clump.  Then add

3 quarts of whole milk
Spices of choice -- currently one vanilla bean split and scraped, one cinnamon stick, and a whole fresh-grated nutmeg (tasts like egg nog)

Cook for another 4 or 5 hours until appreciably thickened and coats the back of a spoon, partially if you want it creamy and not firm.  You can stir once or twice, or beat rapidly with a hand mixer a bit to hasten the process.  You are just breaking down the rice to thicken the milk.

Once thick, fish out remains of spices, beat six eggs a bit with a hand mixer, temper with a ladle-full of the hot pudding, and pour into the pudding while beating with the hand mixer.  Immediately beat in about a cup and a quarter of sugar, or the equivalent fake sugar if you're on a diet -- makes a decently nutritious meal replacement or guiltless dessert.  Cover the surface (touching the pudding all over) with plastic wrap to prevent a skin.  Chill.  I put the whole crock in the fridge.

Eat topped with homemade quince jelly, lingonberries or whatever with a squirt of whipped cream.

Sort of like "Riskrem?" We do that at Christmas. Great stuff with a nice almond flavor with lingonberry or, if lucky and can find cloudberry sauce. One whole almond goes into the bowl and whoever gets it gets a prize (Marzipan Pig) and good luck for the next year! Yum.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #314 on: November 02, 2016, 12:48:31 AM »
Sounds interesting, I make a white trash Rice Pudding with regular long-grain rice once in awhile.  Someday, I do intend to get the "proper" rice for it.  You say you use Japenese short-grain?  Is that the same as sushi-rice?  Not Sure.

Anyhow, my experimental investigative quest for the ultimate rice pudding is to go the custard route.  It sort of works with regular long-grain but the texture is off due to the long-grain rice, I intend someday try both sushi-rice and Arborio rice to see which is superior.

I haven't perfected it but it goes something like this:

-------------------------------

-Prepare rice as normal substituting milk for water* use butter for fat do use a bit of salt (to lessen the amount of sugar needed to taste sweet, ever put a little salt on a watermelon?  A little salt for some reason really knocks the sweet taste up with out loading up on sugar, a light touch is key).

-Prepare a basic Heavy Cream & Egg Yolk custard sweetened to taste, mix in appropriate amount of rice & desired spices (I like just nutmeg, and perhaps a bit of vanilla).

-Bake in a moderate oven (350F?) in a water-bath until custard sets.

-Serve warm, or chill and serve cold.





*I don't really have standard recipe for rice:  I fill the pot up with however much rice I want to cook then measure the depth of the rice with the tip of my index finger at the bottom of the pot, and my thumb marking the level of the rice on the side of my finger.  I then put the tip of my index finger on the surface of the dry rice and add water up to my thumb "index-mark," then add salt and fat (un-measured and the fat varies by the dish, I use butter generally, but will use corn-oil/lard for Mexican/Tex-Mex, Peanut oil for Asian, Olive-Oil/butter for Italian etc).  See graphic if that description is confusing.


------------------------------------

Tonight, I might make a test batch of a biscuit recipe I last made as an 8 or 9-yr old.  I wrote the recipe down on post-It notes and hid it somewhere in my mother's cookbooks.  I have been asking her for years to find it, and she finally found it and gave me a few photo-copies of it. 

I have prepared a special batch of pastry flour for this endeavor (because I am cheap, and where the fuck do you get pastry flour???)::;

1 box of Swan's Down Cake flour (which scaled to 920g) mixed with 986g of Hudson's Cream Short Patent (basically AP flour).  Mixed with a whisk for like ten minutes.

I was aiming for a 8.5% pastry flour, Swan's Down 2g protein per 28g (roughly 7.1%) flour & Hudson's 3g protein per 30g (10%) flour, yields a 5/58 or 8.62% so close enough for me.

The recipe is pretty simple (this from memory because I am too lazy to go downstairs at the moment to find it):


--------------------------------------

500F(!?!) oven.
1 cast iron skillet with 1 Tablespoon shortening (I intend to use lard).  Place skillet in oven to heat.

prepare dough:
2 Tablespoons Shortening (26g I believe) LARD, dammit!
2 Cups + 2 Tablespoons Flour (I am using a 116g pastry flour = 1 Cup conversion factor = 130g flour rounded for simplicity)
1/8 tsp Baking Soda (?g says on box dammit!)
1 tsp Baking Powder (?g says on box dammit!)

mix dry ingredients together then cut in Shortening with a pastry knife, until grainy (little grains of sand as Chef used to say)

1/4 Cup buttermilk (?g am going to weigh a 1/4C of buttermilk & see, as the damn jug tells milliters and the specific gravity of buttermilk is not 1.0, dammit!)

just mix buttermilk in until clumps form NO OVERMIXING HEAR!!!, dammit!

Pour mess out onto floured work area (a wooden countertop is best, but whatever), push mess together, roll & fold 3-4 times NO MORE!!!, dammit! (if I have to bust out a Monty Python video about the dangers of 5, so help me...) Make your final sheet of dough about 1/2 inch thick (1.25cm for you blithering idiot dirty foreigners) cut your biscuit rounds.  If you dare you may attempt to press the leftover pieces into as many "extra biscuits" as you like, these extra biscuits will very likely suck.

Remove the now blistering hot cast-iron skillet with the 1 Tablespoon of lard from the 500F(!?!?!) oven, CAREFULLY, don't burn the baby, Rainman! And place the biscuits gently in the hot shortening, Flip the biscuits over, carefully (this browns the top of the biscuit for you).  Then gently throw the cast-iron skillet back in the 500F(!?!?!?!) oven for about 10-12(?) minutes.

Ding biscuits are done, serve warm with mustard.  (makes 6-8 biscuits, which are most certainly not cookies you foul, filthy foreigners!)

--------------------------------

I am sure I used AP flour as a kid when I made these, but I recall and mother agrees that this was the best and easiest biscuit recipe ever (an 8 or 9-yr old child accomplished it, granted it was me a genius 8 or 9-yr old, still...)  Couldn't tell you what shortening I used as a lad, I am sure Crisco (spit).  I am not certain that a 500F oven is correct, but I shall attempt it as written.  500F seems a bit extreme?  I think pastry takes high and dry heat, so maybe.  I was a child genius, surely I wouldn't have gotten a critical detail like that wrong?  I think the size cast-iron skillet is what I call a "standard" or 9". 

Crap it is late, I may not get to this today...

May report later, see below for "rice recipe explanatory graphic"

Haha I would love to know if you confirm the 500F oven; I've only had it up that high for roasting coffee.  And mustard?  Is that a thing?  Not butter and honey?

I just use Niko Niko or Calrose or whatever's on sale.  I started out with arborio but the cheap stuff works just as well, with no appreciable difference.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #315 on: November 02, 2016, 01:00:39 AM »
Sort of like "Riskrem?" We do that at Christmas. Great stuff with a nice almond flavor with lingonberry or, if lucky and can find cloudberry sauce. One whole almond goes into the bowl and whoever gets it gets a prize (Marzipan Pig) and good luck for the next year! Yum.

Ha yeah that is how it's done!  Have a jar of multebær in the cupboard waiting for Christmas.  We make risgrøt, which has a lot less milk and is more of a porridge, for Christmas Eve (plus a bowl for the nisse with a big pat of butter, you know!), and fold in whipped cream on Christmas for riskrem.

Have also discovered that marzipan is pretty easy to make if you can find almond flour -- homemade is every bit as good as the Lübecker stuff people go on about, which (I must admit) is better than anything that comes out of Norway.  So will shape our own stjernegris from now on, like adult playdoh.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #316 on: November 03, 2016, 12:03:51 AM »
Haha I would love to know if you confirm the 500F oven; I've only had it up that high for roasting coffee.  And mustard?  Is that a thing?  Not butter and honey?

I just use Niko Niko or Calrose or whatever's on sale.  I started out with arborio but the cheap stuff works just as well, with no appreciable difference.

I can confirm the 500F oven (damn the kitchen got hot), although my attempt last night was less than spectacular.  I rolled the dough 4 times, and managed to get it too thin yielding 10 or 11 biscuits instead of the six that it should have made.  So they were a bit flat (I think my powder & soda might be a bit old as well) but quite flaky, I will add a bit more salt next time in addition to only rolling and folding 3 times.  I was going to take a picture, but didn't want to embarrass myself.  I seem to inherited the dreaded "biscuit fail gene" that has plagued my family for centuries...

As to the Mustard thing I suggest you watch this short informational video, and listen to what the man says right at the end...



Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #317 on: November 03, 2016, 10:09:45 PM »
I can confirm the 500F oven (damn the kitchen got hot), although my attempt last night was less than spectacular.  I rolled the dough 4 times, and managed to get it too thin yielding 10 or 11 biscuits instead of the six that it should have made.  So they were a bit flat (I think my powder & soda might be a bit old as well) but quite flaky, I will add a bit more salt next time in addition to only rolling and folding 3 times.  I was going to take a picture, but didn't want to embarrass myself.  I seem to inherited the dreaded "biscuit fail gene" that has plagued my family for centuries...

As to the Mustard thing I suggest you watch this short informational video, and listen to what the man says right at the end...

Ha have never tried to make biscuits but now I want to.  Sounds a bit like my lefse -- simple, few ingredients, all in the handling.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #318 on: November 04, 2016, 12:17:03 AM »
Ha have never tried to make biscuits but now I want to.  Sounds a bit like my lefse -- simple, few ingredients, all in the handling.

Worse than a scratch pie-crust...

That's my reckoning.



Even my attempts at the perfect clone McDonald's lardy Freedom Fries are stymied.

I canna git them crispy like them tater's otter bee...

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #319 on: November 04, 2016, 12:19:38 AM »
Worse than a scratch pie-crust...

That's my reckoning.



Even my attempts at the perfect clone McDonald's lardy Freedom Fries are stymied.

I canna git them crispy like them tater's otter bee...

Somewhere in the back of my mind, from God knows what source, is the idea that the fries are first tossed in corn starch which coats the outside and crisps.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #320 on: November 04, 2016, 12:24:37 AM »
I thought it was a low blanche in either oil or water, for a short time then return to room temp that made that whole thing happen.

mmm, I reckon the best crisp pomme frites are not kept under a red-light.  Mebbe thas whar this corn-starch mythiologique arrive>?  (plumbus furgoat them eye-talian fragile warmings 'n suck,,, mm)

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #321 on: November 04, 2016, 12:27:43 AM »
I can confirm the 500F oven
The best invented, and not a new idea most nice places, at least in the South, had back in the good old days is a separate kitchen (fire and heat risk.) Now, unless you were landed gentry it has changed now, the outdoor kitchen n bbq area is popular and awesome. Keep the heat out of the house, enjoy the pool/yard, and cook nice, albeit more bbq etc but some really can do well with other stuff know and the ceramic things can cook awesome with little fuel and have gas for other stuff.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #322 on: November 04, 2016, 12:35:22 AM »
I thought it was a low blanche in either oil or water, for a short time then return to room temp that made that whole thing happen.

mmm, I reckon the best crisp pomme frites are not kept under a red-light.  Mebbe thas whar this corn-starch mythiologique arrive>?  (plumbus furgoat them eye-talian fragile warmings 'n suck,,, mm)

Ah you are correct of course!  Mille pardons !

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #323 on: November 06, 2016, 07:01:14 PM »
I see from my strange posting behaviour here and in other places that my biscuit quest briefly drove me insane.

I apologize, but I just figured out what I did wrong:  in converting the recipe from imperial volume to metric weight for kitchen laboratory experimentation I mistakenly weighed a 1/4 cup of butter milk (should have been 1/2 cup) and wrote that down and proceeded to make flat, insubstantial and metallic tasting biscuits (there wasn't enough acidic buttermilk to react with the baking soda).  On the bright side, I tightened up my biscuit technique and got new fresh baking soda and powder for the kitchen (and cleared my drains with the old dump old soda down the drain then rinse with a little water, then dump vinegar down the drain trick).  My baking soda & powder were over 2 years old! (they were still good, the third batch of biscuits with the bad recipe turned out the same as the first three...)

SO.

Here is my original hand-written on postIt-note recipe (I am amazed that I still have my awful childish handwriting, and a bit ashamed.  My penmanship could use some work):

Quote
Biscuits

Frying pan with 1 tblsp short.  500 degree oven.  1 cup 2 tblsp flour 1/4 tsp bake soda, 1 tsp bake powder, pinch salt, 2 tblsp short, cut in with pastry cutter until grainy add 1/2 cup buttermilk stir with fork, don't over mix.  pat out on floured board pinch together, don't over knead, roll together 3 or 4 times, Punch down until 1/2 inch thick, cut should make 6. remove skillet/pan put cut biscuits into pan and flip them, cook for 10 min 500 degree oven,

This becomes:

ORIGINAL                                        =       DOUGH %     =    550g batch Biscuit Dough

1 Tblsp             Shortening(for skillet)=            -             =      14g Lard

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2 Tblsp             Shortening                =         20%           =      50g Shortening(30g unsalted butter + 20g lard)
1 cup + 2 Tblsp Flour                        =        100%          =     254g Pastry Flour
1/4 tsp              Baking soda             =            1%          =     2.5g Baking soda
1 tsp                 Baking powder          =         3.5%         =        9g Baking powder
pinch                 Salt                         =        0.75%         =        2g Salt
1/2 cup             Buttermilk                 =          92%         =     232g Buttermilk

                                   total dough% =     217.25%        =     550g biscuit dough*
500F oven (non-convection)

Measure shortening into a 9" cast-iron skillet, put skillet into oven turn oven to 500F.

Measure and sift together flour, salt, baking soda & powder.  (I sift AFTER weighing because it doesn't matter, I also sift 3 times to get a good mix, you can just stir it together)

Measure and add COLD shortening to dry ingredients, cut in until grainy.  (I cut the butter and lard up into smallish chunks as I weigh it, then cut in with a pastry cutter/knife)

Measure and add buttermilk, stir in with a fork until just mixed.  (I mix until a few clumps form with some loose flour)

Dump out onto lightly floured surface, making sure all the unmixed flour and dough stuck to sides of mixing bowl get onto the board.  Pinch and press together with fingers and hands into a roughly 9" circle, press down to even the top out.

Fold in half, fold the half again into a quarter, press with hands back down into a roughly 9" circle(1 full fold).  Repeat two more times (3 folds total).  (I dust the top of the dough with the loose bits before each fold, and even add a very light dusting of extra flour if the dough seems too sticky)

Press with fingertips out into large enough circle to cut 7 biscuits, reserve or throw away scraps.  (I use my grandma's old Cottelene shortening lid/biscuit cutter 2 3/4 inch diameter, a drinking glass will work just as well.  The dough should be about 1/2 inch thick)

Remove skillet from oven.  (should be 500F by now)  Place all 7 biscuits in the hot shortening keeping track of which was first, flip all the biscuits with a spatula.  (I try to use the "First-In-First-to-Flip" method.)

Put skillet & biscuits into oven and bake for 10 minutes.

*If desired form the scraps into more biscuits and cook immediately or freeze for later (I got 3.5 "extra biscuits" and am freezing them to see if they are worth saving for later - experimental...)  These biscuits will not be as good as the first-cut ones (my sister says the "extra biscuits" are actually her favorite, so there's that...





These were damn good biscuits btw.  I haven't tried them with mustard yet...  find the picture of the finished 1 1/4"-1 1/2" biscuits below!

*** Dough% is a weird semi-mathematical trick used in the bakeshop to scale up/down recipes as needed.  Flour is always 100%, and ever other ingredient measured by that.  For example, if you were using 100g of flour in this recipe, you would use 20g of shortening, 1g of baking soda, etc.  This gets you more consistent results than simply halving or doubling amounts, not exactly sure why it is this way, but it really does work.  Bakers/pastry chefs are a strange lot, and almost always Swiss or German for some reason...





Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #324 on: November 06, 2016, 07:08:17 PM »
These were damn good biscuits btw.

THE MOCKINGBIRD FLIES BY MOONLIGHT

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #325 on: November 06, 2016, 07:19:11 PM »
THE MOCKINGBIRD FLIES BY MOONLIGHT

They say they have no song of their own but can only mimic others.  8)

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #326 on: November 06, 2016, 07:19:32 PM »
THE MOCKINGBIRD FLIES BY MOONLIGHT

THE OWL HOOTS AT THE NOON

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #327 on: November 06, 2016, 07:21:16 PM »
These were damn good biscuits btw.

They look delicious, pate. One day soon I'm going to try to make them.  :P

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #328 on: November 06, 2016, 07:36:39 PM »
I see from my strange posting behaviour here and in other places that my biscuit quest briefly drove me insane...

Thank you dear pate!  But you have not told us how you ate them -- I was half-persuaded the mustard was real.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #329 on: November 07, 2016, 12:47:21 AM »
Andelusian....