Author Topic: Cooking With Chefist!  (Read 27769 times)

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Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #180 on: November 14, 2015, 10:24:07 AM »
1. Buy some good scotch e.g. a nice single malt or high-end blend.
2. Pour scotch into glass over ice and/or mix with water/soda.
3. Realize you suck for ruining a good scotch like that. :o
4. Dump it out and start over.
5. Pour scotch into glass, neat.
6. Sip and enjoy.
+10

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #181 on: November 14, 2015, 10:24:23 AM »
LOL - I substitute all white vinegar w/ cider in my recipes too, unless I'm doing a reduction.

I encourage people to experiment with different vinegars...

- Rice Wine
- Seasoned Rice Wine
- Unfiltered Cider
- Unfiltered Malt

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #182 on: November 14, 2015, 10:50:45 AM »
You may be right about the lutefisk; there are enough Scandies around here that I can buy it already soaked, ready for the final, brief baking in butter.

Would love to try the raw herring!  The Dutch sure know what they're about.  I think the Swedes got the preparation for Matjes herring from them -- by far my favorite.

We get large runs of smelt here in the NW, also a fatty little fish, delivered super fresh.  I wonder if you can eat them in a similar fashion.
Smelt are delicious battered and deep fried. Due to dropping numbers from over-fishing the Great Lakes, prices have gone up considerably. But you can still grab the drop net when the annual run starts in the rivers.


Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #183 on: November 14, 2015, 11:28:13 AM »
I get my balsamic vinegars & olive oils from the oilerie The black currant and garlic O.O.'s are awesome.
You've never had good bacon unless you've sampled some Neuske's. This stuff is to die for. Hell, the convenience stores around here have a hard time keeping it in stock. Not cheap, but for a treat, I'd highly recommend it.
Edit: They also carry Applewood Smoked Landjaeger


Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #184 on: November 14, 2015, 11:32:17 AM »
I get my balsamic vinegars & olive oils from the oilerie The black currant and garlic O.O.'s are awesome.
You've never had good bacon unless you've sampled some Neuske's. This stuff is to die for. Hell, the convenience stores around here have a hard time keeping it in stock. Not cheap, but for a treat, I'd highly recommend it.

Thanks for the link, Logan...i'm working on pricing my bacon right now...would you like to try some? i can pack it in dry ice and send it to you...

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #185 on: November 14, 2015, 01:13:48 PM »
Pungent cheeses are one thing, but if anyone ever offers you Casu Marzu, get up, turn towards the door, and run like hell ! In fact, be very careful of eating any cheese when you are in Italy unless you know exactly what it is.  :o
Good Lord! "When disturbed, the larvae can launch themselves for distances up to 15 cm (6 in)." !!!

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #186 on: November 16, 2015, 07:13:47 PM »
beef stew

1 lb stew meat
1/4 c flour
1 packet onion soup mix
1 small yellow onion (sliced into rings)
1 tbsp garlic (minced)
1 teaspoon worcestershire sauce
2 beef bullion cubes  or 2 cans beef broth
2.5 c water (only one if using broth)
about 5 cups of cubed potatoes and sliced carrots (and/or any other veggie you want)
1 pkg brown gravy mix
put meat ,flour and onion mix into crock pot
stir to coat meat
add 1.5 c of water (or broth) and the bullion cubes (skip if using broth)
add the worcestershire sauce onions and  garlic.
turn crock onto low, let simmer 4 hours.
add veggies , let simmer 4-6 hours.
mix the gravy mix with the remaining water and add to crock. simmer till it thickens up some (~ 1 hour).
enjoy

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #187 on: November 16, 2015, 07:17:51 PM »
beef stew

1 lb stew meat
1/4 c flour
1 packet onion soup mix
1 small yellow onion (sliced into rings)
1 tbsp garlic (minced)
1 teaspoon worcestershire sauce
2 beef bullion cubes  or 2 cans beef broth
2.5 c water (only one if using broth)
about 5 cups of cubed potatoes and sliced carrots (and/or any other veggie you want)
1 pkg brown gravy mix
put meat ,flour and onion mix into crock pot
stir to coat meat
add 1.5 c of water (or broth) and the bullion cubes (skip if using broth)
add the worcestershire sauce onions and  garlic.
turn crock onto low, let simmer 4 hours.
add veggies , let simmer 4-6 hours.
mix the gravy mix with the remaining water and add to crock. simmer till it thickens up some (~ 1 hour).
enjoy

A good, savory recipe...I like it!..I would also recommend to change the 1.5 C of water to, 1 Cup of water and 0.5 cup of red wine, sprig of rosemary and 2 bay leaves...

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #188 on: November 16, 2015, 07:19:09 PM »
A good, savory recipe...I like it!..I would also recommend to change the 1.5 C of water to, 1 Cup of water and 0.5 cup of red wine, sprig of rosemary and 2 bay leaves...
i dont do wine

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #189 on: November 16, 2015, 07:24:41 PM »
i dont do wine

Oh that's just a recommendation...not needed...a tablespoon of balsamic at the very end will also give a similar character profile...

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #190 on: November 16, 2015, 07:26:46 PM »
Oh that's just a recommendation...not needed...a tablespoon of balsamic at the very end will also give a similar character profile...
just be sure its real balsamic, dont get the cheep stuff

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #191 on: November 16, 2015, 07:30:41 PM »
just be sure its real balsamic, dont get the cheep stuff

Yes, it needs to be the thick stuff in the small bottle...the cheap ones are too acidic and just plain blow...

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #192 on: November 16, 2015, 07:35:40 PM »
Yes, it needs to be the thick stuff in the small bottle...the cheap ones are too acidic and just plain blow...
the cheep ones are just white vinigar "flavored" (and colored)  to sorta taste like balsamic . maybe.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #193 on: November 27, 2015, 05:56:09 AM »
i dont do wine

Doan take my bitter chef pill wrong:\



Do this with home-made sayusage?!?

I sip my eau d'vie...

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #194 on: November 27, 2015, 11:28:08 AM »
Well his stories of the "Duct Tape Girl" s epic flatulnce put me off Bologna sammiches. Thanks Mr Too Broke To Shave Or Trim Beard Growth

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #195 on: November 27, 2015, 11:50:35 AM »
Hey chefist I listened to you when you were on Bella. Would you consider doing a podcast on cooking?? Deep talk is looking for shows I'm sure.


Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #196 on: November 27, 2015, 01:09:40 PM »
just be sure its real balsamic, dont get the cheep stuff
I love to have real balsamic on top of real vanilla ice cream. Yum, yum!

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #197 on: December 05, 2015, 05:29:17 PM »
Not to be a dick, honest question for a man of your expertise. For arguably the ultimate classical Western nation, why is British cuisine so bad?

French food is awesome, Spanish food is awesome, Italian food is the best. Why is English food so distinctly not good.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #198 on: December 05, 2015, 05:34:30 PM »
Not to be a dick, honest question for a man of your expertise. For arguably the ultimate classical Western nation, why is British cuisine so bad?

French food is awesome, Spanish food is awesome, Italian food is the best. Why is English food so distinctly not good.

It is an interesting question. England has always had excellent trade and merchant history... Very close to France... Surrounded by excellent seafood...

The ultimate expression of culture is language... The second arguably is cuisine...

Perhaps their focus on other endeavors... Profit...science..??? However England is known for their excellent gardens...WWII they dug up all the flower gardens and planted veggies...

It's a fantastic topic...

Perhaps some of the English folks can weigh in on this...

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #199 on: December 05, 2015, 05:37:01 PM »
Even though we argue...a roast with Yorkshire pudding is very tasty! I love English breakfast too...

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #200 on: December 05, 2015, 05:42:45 PM »
Even though we argue...a roast with Yorkshire pudding is very tasty! I love English breakfast too...

Yeah I originally thought of that watching everyone troll each other in the politics thread and then turned into a real question in my mind. Just about everyone I know is on the same page Europe is amazing, all the countries are cool but Britain always rates as one of the worst to visit because the food is so terrible.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #201 on: December 05, 2015, 05:48:56 PM »
Not to be a dick, honest question for a man of your expertise. For arguably the ultimate classical Western nation, why is British cuisine so bad?

French food is awesome, Spanish food is awesome, Italian food is the best. Why is English food so distinctly not good.
I totally disagree with you. I'll take British food over French or Belgian any day of the week. Bigger portions and tastier. And forget a "continental" breakfast. Full English beats that hands-down. But steak and kidney pie, black pudding, fish and chips, Yorkshire pudding and Sunday roast, bacon rolls, Cumberland sausages, mushy peas, etc what is not to like! Ok, jellied eel. But other than that?

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #202 on: December 05, 2015, 06:00:06 PM »
I totally disagree with you. I'll take British food over French or Belgian any day of the week. Bigger portions and tastier. And forget a "continental" breakfast. Full English beats that hands-down. But steak and kidney pie, black pudding, fish and chips, Yorkshire pudding and Sunday roast, bacon rolls, Cumberland sausages, mushy peas, etc what is not to like! Ok, jellied eel. But other than that?

Maybe American cuisine was so close to it, people preferred the more exotic cuisines?

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #203 on: December 05, 2015, 06:07:25 PM »
Maybe American cuisine was so close to it, people preferred the more exotic cuisines?
Could be. For the more 'exotic' you can get great "Indian" food there in Britain (often actually Pakistani but, hey, they used to be part of India.) I don't know; price and portion size and, as you mention, maybe because closer to our food I like British food. And everyone thinks I'm crazy! Not to say, at all that others' foods aren't good. But, for whatever reason, I like the 'peasant' food versus fancy stuff, in almost every country (European- not Asian!) More substantial, savory, etc.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #204 on: December 05, 2015, 06:12:43 PM »
"The mass of English men lead lives of quiet indigestion, and go to the grave with the wrong still in them."  - Henry D Thoreautomat.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #205 on: December 05, 2015, 06:13:58 PM »
"The mass of English men lead lives of quiet indigestion, and go to the grave with the wrong still in them."  - Henry D Thoreautomat.

Hehe

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #206 on: December 05, 2015, 06:16:13 PM »
"The mass of English men lead lives of quiet indigestion, and go to the grave with the wrong still in them."  - Henry D Thoreautomat.
Well that explains their devotion to the Falkie thread.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #207 on: December 05, 2015, 06:17:28 PM »

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #208 on: December 05, 2015, 11:00:32 PM »
Maybe American cuisine was so close to it, people preferred the more exotic cuisines?

I think that British cuisine, to a greater extent than the rest of Europe, was infected by the same convenience-food blight that infected American food in the 20th century so that they forgot what real food tasted like.  Thanks to some good food tv they're coming out of it now.

I have a fondness for English baking this time of year.  Nothing says Christmas like good old mixed spice, fruitcake, plum pudding, mincemeat.  And they're, to my knowledge, the only other people to bake with saffron -- heaven in a bun.



This is the week to bake lussekatter.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #209 on: December 11, 2015, 11:44:58 AM »
Has anyone here used Xanthan gum as a thickener?