Author Topic: Cooking With Chefist!  (Read 28032 times)

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Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #150 on: November 09, 2015, 12:58:17 PM »
many use ziplock bags for ease of transport and release onto the cooking surface...


Isn't that contraption in the picture for krumkake (yum?) Not lefse. Different thing, but good.

ps: Thor Heyerdahl's books, and life, are amazing. I wish he was around for Art to interview because his theories and experiences are right up the alley of the radio show. Fatu Hiva (as published in English) is awesome, as are the more famous ones.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #151 on: November 09, 2015, 12:59:32 PM »
Isn't that contraption in the picture for krumkake (yum?) Not lefse. Different thing, but good.

ps: Thor Heyerdahl's books, and life, are amazing. I wish he was around for Art to interview because his theories and experiences are right up the alley of the radio show. Fatu Hiva (as published in English) is awesome, as are the more famous ones.

tortillas de maseca...


Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #152 on: November 09, 2015, 01:01:06 PM »
many use ziplock bags for ease of transport and release onto the cooking surface...



Oh god a press like that would be wonderful!  Do they make big ones?  The lefse board has diameter marks printed on it -- 10, 12, 14 inches -- just to taunt you.  Make small, thick ones and the old ladies will whisper "tortilla" under their breath.


Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #153 on: November 09, 2015, 01:01:06 PM »
many use ziplock bags for ease of transport and release onto the cooking surface...


I wish you kids would keep your smut pics out of the cooking thread. People are trying to cook and junk.


Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #154 on: November 09, 2015, 01:02:56 PM »
Oh god a press like that would be wonderful!  Do they make big ones?  The lefse board has diameter marks printed on it -- 10, 12, 14 inches -- just to taunt you.  Make small, thick ones and the old ladies will whisper "tortilla" under their breath.
I never seen anyone use those for lefse. I'm pretty sure (I never did the cooking of this stuff) it is for krumkake.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #155 on: November 09, 2015, 01:03:33 PM »
Man that looks very good! Almost the same as mine. I'm lucky enough that I have fresh sage growing year around here in the desert...sage and pork are a match made in heaven!

The turkey addition is very interesting...I'm going to try that! Thanks! It's amazing how much better (and cheaper) sausage is when you make it fresh!
my neighbor has a sage bush that grows like a weed. i can always get fresh sage ,(by the pound) and dry the extra.
here its cheaper to buy the premade sausage than ground pork; i dont know why. but i prefer my home made to anything bought , so i continue to make it

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #156 on: November 09, 2015, 01:07:54 PM »
I never seen anyone use those for lefse. I'm pretty sure (I never did the cooking of this stuff) it is for krumkake.

These work the best, but are a bit pricey...


Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #157 on: November 09, 2015, 01:09:45 PM »
I never seen anyone use those for lefse. I'm pretty sure (I never did the cooking of this stuff) it is for krumkake.

I think Chefist's is a Mexican appliance used for tortillas, but yeah it's similar to my krumkake iron without the design.  A giant press for lefse would be a most-sensible invention -- the Mexicans have the right idea.

WE have to roll it out to paper-thinness on the board, pick it up carefully rolling it back on the pin, then roll it back out on the griddle.  Then flip it with a special stick.  Actually the flipping isn't as hard as you'd think; it's pretty coherent after the one side cooks.  That's probably why they never resorted to a press.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #158 on: November 09, 2015, 01:10:14 PM »
These work the best, but are a bit pricey...


Huh, never seen a wood one. The ones I've seen are old and passed down, like that last pic.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krumkake

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #159 on: November 09, 2015, 01:13:21 PM »
I think Chefist's is a Mexican appliance used for tortillas, but yeah it's similar to my krumkake iron without the design.  A giant press for lefse would be a most-sensible invention -- the Mexicans have the right idea.

WE have to roll it out to paper-thinness on the board, pick it up carefully rolling it back on the pin, then roll it back out on the griddle.  Then flip it with a special stick.  Actually the flipping isn't as hard as you'd think; it's pretty coherent after the one side cooks.  That's probably why they never resorted to a press.

That would be a skill honed with much practice...is it a holiday specialty or is it something eaten often?

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #160 on: November 09, 2015, 01:21:49 PM »
That would be a skill honed with much practice...is it a holiday specialty or is it something eaten often?

Mostly around Christmas, but my aunt makes her potato-flake version several times a year, usually when she's feeling down or sentimental.

In Norway they sell a dried, square variety called Vestlandslefse I think that you reconstitute by running briefly under water and letting it sit under a wet towel, believe it or not.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #161 on: November 09, 2015, 01:26:25 PM »
Mostly around Christmas, but my aunt makes her potato-flake version several times a year, usually when she's feeling down or sentimental.

In Norway they sell a dried, square variety called Vestlandslefse I think that you reconstitute by running briefly under water and letting it sit under a wet towel, believe it or not.
Man, I love potatoes. Surely it's God's ultimate comfort food. 

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #162 on: November 09, 2015, 01:29:26 PM »
Mostly around Christmas, but my aunt makes her potato-flake version several times a year, usually when she's feeling down or sentimental.

In Norway they sell a dried, square variety called Vestlandslefse I think that you reconstitute by running briefly under water and letting it sit under a wet towel, believe it or not.
My grandma used to make it and store it under her bed! Like lutefisk*, gavelaks, silt, dried cod, etc, waaay back when, pre oil-boom but way before that everything was about preservation, not necessarily taste! I think lefse etc used to be a common thing (like tortillas in Mexico) but now (at least here) mainly made for Christmas time for tradition and taste. The various fancy cakes and cookies, I think, were only made for Christmas, weddings, etc and certainly not daily fare.
ps: keep in mind also in days around Christmas one has a lot of time to kill in some small house in the dark! Hence the rolling and process probably kept people busy. And the rolling pin can be used as a weapon for errand husbands.

* a codfish that underwent a process in lye that can be reconstituted with water and eaten much later. An acquired taste, at best.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #163 on: November 09, 2015, 01:35:19 PM »
My grandma used to make it and store it under her bed! Like lutefisk*, gavelaks, silt, dried cod, etc, waaay back when, pre oil-boom but way before that everything was about preservation, not necessarily taste! I think lefse etc used to be a common thing (like tortillas in Mexico) but now (at least here) mainly made for Christmas time for tradition and taste. The various fancy cakes and cookies, I think, were only made for Christmas, weddings, etc and certainly not daily fare.
ps: keep in mind also in days around Christmas one has a lot of time to kill in some small house in the dark! Hence the rolling and process probably kept people busy. And the rolling pin can be used as a weapon for errand husbands.

* a codfish that underwent a process in lye that can be reconstituted with water and eaten much later. An acquired taste, at best.

What was stored under the bed?  Dried lefse, or lutefisk?

And as far as sylt, that is a vast improvement on the original, isn't it?  My grandma used to get live ones intended as bait for salmon and pickle them.

Lutefisk started out as a simple dried cod, hard as a board.  The lye is used to reconstitute and tenderize it, then rinsed out with water.  Barely cooked in butter, it's actually quite delicate and inoffensive.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #164 on: November 09, 2015, 01:47:20 PM »
I am not very familiar with Nordic cuisine...i've had lutefisk and pickled herring, but that is about it...

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #165 on: November 09, 2015, 01:50:41 PM »
I am not very familiar with Nordic cuisine...i've had lutefisk and pickled herring, but that is about it...

Well lutefisk is at least varsity-level!  I think unless you grow up with it and its flavor is redolent with memories of Grandma and Grandpa it must seem bland or possibly disgusting.

It's mostly a vehicle for delivering large quantities of melted butter.  Kind of like rømmegrøt, warm, thickened sour cream served with at least an inch of melted butter on top, and cinnamon and sugar.  Surely there is no more calorically dense substance known to man.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #166 on: November 09, 2015, 01:54:49 PM »
What was stored under the bed?  Dried lefse, or lutefisk?

And as far as sylt, that is a vast improvement on the original, isn't it?  My grandma used to get live ones intended as bait for salmon and pickle them.

Lutefisk started out as a simple dried cod, hard as a board.  The lye is used to reconstitute and tenderize it, then rinsed out with water.  Barely cooked in butter, it's actually quite delicate and inoffensive.
The lefse. Thankfully lutefisk was bought and only during the cooking process dealt with the smells, but usually that was over-powered by the cooking of rodkal  ;) which I can eat all day long but the smell lingers in a house. It is more the texture, than the taste, that I think can put people off lutefisk because it can be sorta gelatinous.

re: sild. Ha. Actually, for whatever reason I love pickled fish. And now I hear they are actually good for you (Omega-3s apparently.) But I'll you- if you ever visit the Netherlands try out (only during a certain time) when they bring in the "New Herring" (Hollandse Nieuwe) it is, basically raw and you just eat it like a seal (though some put on bread with some onion and pickles.) Sounds gross but actually VERY tasty. And again, good for you. (Dutch claim why they are the tallest people was due to it back in the day when most of Europe subsided on grains and not much protein.)

re: lutefisk. I always heard it was initially dried out by lye (or wood-ash I guess back in the day) to preserve, not just air or smoke or salted dry like other types of dried fish.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #167 on: November 09, 2015, 01:59:30 PM »
I am not very familiar with Nordic cuisine...i've had lutefisk and pickled herring, but that is about it...
Lutefisk? You are granted Norwegian-American status. Look for you SON membership card in the mail. People there don't even eat it much, it is their descendants here who keep it alive!

I've always wanted to make this for Christmas but have been always over-ruled, both for the process which I might not be able to handle, the look, and now the 'madcow' concern. Interestingly it reminds me of how Mexicans make barbacoa (which is banned here also if done in the 'traditional' burying fire way I think for the same safety concern with the 'mad cow' stuff.)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smalahove

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #168 on: November 09, 2015, 02:07:22 PM »
The lefse. Thankfully lutefisk was bought and only during the cooking process dealt with the smells, but usually that was over-powered by the cooking of rodkal  ;) which I can eat all day long but the smell lingers in a house. It is more the texture, than the taste, that I think can put people off lutefisk because it can be sorta gelatinous.

re: sild. Ha. Actually, for whatever reason I love pickled fish. And now I hear they are actually good for you (Omega-3s apparently.) But I'll you- if you ever visit the Netherlands try out (only during a certain time) when they bring in the "New Herring" (Hollandse Nieuwe) it is, basically raw and you just eat it like a seal (though some put on bread with some onion and pickles.) Sounds gross but actually VERY tasty. And again, good for you. (Dutch claim why they are the tallest people was due to it back in the day when most of Europe subsided on grains and not much protein.)

re: lutefisk. I always heard it was initially dried out by lye (or wood-ash I guess back in the day) to preserve, not just air or smoke or salted dry like other types of dried fish.

You may be right about the lutefisk; there are enough Scandies around here that I can buy it already soaked, ready for the final, brief baking in butter.

Would love to try the raw herring!  The Dutch sure know what they're about.  I think the Swedes got the preparation for Matjes herring from them -- by far my favorite.

We get large runs of smelt here in the NW, also a fatty little fish, delivered super fresh.  I wonder if you can eat them in a similar fashion.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #169 on: November 14, 2015, 07:52:23 AM »

Yes, this looks like something I might like as well  ;)

just be very aware the certain PB brands have xylitol as a sweetener...  do not use any of them for dogs

http://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/is-peanut-butter-safe-for-dogs, yep my neighbor says his dog loves PB out of the jar directly on celery !!!! 
So do I. Either PB or Creme Cheese. Both are yummy. :)

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #170 on: November 14, 2015, 08:02:51 AM »
hot bacon dressing

8 slices bacon
1 1/2 cups white sugar
3 teaspoons cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup water
1/2 cup white vinegar
DIRECTIONS:
1.   Place bacon in a large, deep skillet. Cook over medium high heat until evenly brown. Drain, crumble and set aside.
2.   In a medium bowl, whisk together the sugar, cornstarch and salt, and slowly pour in water and vinegar, whisking constantly.
3.   In a medium skillet, add the crumbled bacon and pour the vinegar mixture over it. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture thickens.

4.   Pour hot, over previously prepared single serving bowls of lettuce and serve immediately
                                                             or
refrigerate for up to 3 days.3 days is how long it lasts till i eat it all. with that much vinegar it should last almost forever .
FIFY
This is delicious especially when you add 1/4 cup freshly chopped chives immediately before pouring over the lettuce.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #171 on: November 14, 2015, 08:02:52 AM »
So do I. Either PB or Creme Cheese. Both are yummy. :)
How about Gammelost?: I once was in some upscale cheese store in London that had just about every type of cheese and was nice place and asked them and the owner said "hell no, it tastes good but the smell we cannot handle it here!")

Gammelost (or Gammalost, or Gamalost) is Norwegian “Oldcheese:" allow skimmed milk to sour in a wooden bucket. The milk is then heated until the curds separate from the whey. The curds are collected in a cheese cloth and pressed in a form to rid them of all of the watery whey. The cheese is then left in a warm room to ferment, and regularly rubbed in with French brandy. When it begins to smell, the cheese is allowed to mature in a bucket of straw stored in the cellar. For at least a year. Gamalost is rich in protein with low fat content, measuring 1% fat and 50% protein.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #172 on: November 14, 2015, 08:50:39 AM »
How about Gammelost?: I once was in some upscale cheese store in London that had just about every type of cheese and was nice place and asked them and the owner said "hell no, it tastes good but the smell we cannot handle it here!")

Gammelost (or Gammalost, or Gamalost) is Norwegian “Oldcheese:" allow skimmed milk to sour in a wooden bucket. The milk is then heated until the curds separate from the whey. The curds are collected in a cheese cloth and pressed in a form to rid them of all of the watery whey. The cheese is then left in a warm room to ferment, and regularly rubbed in with French brandy. When it begins to smell, the cheese is allowed to mature in a bucket of straw stored in the cellar. For at least a year. Gamalost is rich in protein with low fat content, measuring 1% fat and 50% protein.

Or you could go to Trader Joes. They have all kinds of fancy yet affordable cheeses. I don't think they would have something as hoity toity as Gamalost, but they have other ones that you would like.This is their latest offering:

http://www.traderjoes.com/digin/post/vieux-chimay-aged-hard-cheese


Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #173 on: November 14, 2015, 08:59:57 AM »
How about Gammelost?: I once was in some upscale cheese store in London that had just about every type of cheese and was nice place and asked them and the owner said "hell no, it tastes good but the smell we cannot handle it here!")

Gammelost (or Gammalost, or Gamalost) is Norwegian “Oldcheese:" allow skimmed milk to sour in a wooden bucket. The milk is then heated until the curds separate from the whey. The curds are collected in a cheese cloth and pressed in a form to rid them of all of the watery whey. The cheese is then left in a warm room to ferment, and regularly rubbed in with French brandy. When it begins to smell, the cheese is allowed to mature in a bucket of straw stored in the cellar. For at least a year. Gamalost is rich in protein with low fat content, measuring 1% fat and 50% protein.
Never heard of that one, but a quick search reveals that it's a granular bleu cheese. It sounds delicious. I love a good bleu cheese and a granular/ crystalline texture. Very labor intensive to make in the traditional manner though.
I'll have to see if I can find some gamalost. Apparently Vieux Boulogne, Gamalost, Stinking Bishop, Epoisses, Ardrahan, and Cabrales make Limburger smell like Velveeta, that's how pungent they are.
Must needs track some down. ;)   :) 

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #174 on: November 14, 2015, 09:04:27 AM »
Thanks IB :)

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #175 on: November 14, 2015, 09:09:49 AM »
Or you could go to Trader Joes. They have all kinds of fancy yet affordable cheeses. I don't think they would have something as hoity toity as Gamalost, but they have other ones that you would like.This is their latest offering:

http://www.traderjoes.com/digin/post/vieux-chimay-aged-hard-cheese


Thanks, probably good stuff but doesn't cut it. (See what I did there?) But thanks. Gammelost is the exact opposite of hoity-toity, and almost can't be cut, hence can't be found in stores. It is homemade stuff by peasants, basically. I recall stored, once brought out, stored in contraption with water around edges (?) to keep moist or stop air and smell. I don't recall. But, speaking of other good cheeses, the best often smell and so, can't do here (!) but in milder climes, some of the older gouda etc can be stored outside on a window sill (if one lives in an apartment on upper floors so no stealing from ruffians or rats.) Store in fridge or in kitchen will cause other stuff to smell like it.


Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #177 on: November 14, 2015, 10:02:29 AM »
Pungent cheeses are one thing, but if anyone ever offers you Casu Marzu, get up, turn towards the door, and run like hell ! In fact, be very careful of eating any cheese when you are in Italy unless you know exactly what it is.  :o

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #178 on: November 14, 2015, 10:08:07 AM »
considering the 1/2 C white (i used cider) vinegar ...
LOL - I substitute all white vinegar w/ cider in my recipes too, unless I'm doing a reduction.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #179 on: November 14, 2015, 10:18:24 AM »
can I use my gas grill inside? If not what is the difference between the grill and a gas stove?
Nothing, but they both vent Carbon-Monoxide into the home. A gas stove generally has an exhaust fan above it. CM can kill you if enough of it builds up, as it displaces oxygen.