Author Topic: Cooking With Chefist!  (Read 27778 times)

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Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #120 on: September 28, 2015, 11:30:48 PM »
I'm with ya Barfly.  Please Chefist, please.  I beg of thee to bless us with thy presences and thy podcast.  Amen.

P.S.  And what Barfly said too. ;D

P.S.S.  How about a weekly cooking show podcast?
I really like the podcast better than Art or the RCH show, as far as a cooking show it may not work for me, afraid of burning my house down, im good with the microwave though  ;)

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #121 on: September 29, 2015, 04:04:41 PM »
I really like the podcast better than Art or the RCH show, as far as a cooking show it may not work for me, afraid of burning my house down, im good with the microwave and a dented can of dog food, though  ;)

FIFY

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #122 on: September 29, 2015, 06:26:10 PM »
I'm with ya Barfly.  Please Chefist, please.  I beg of thee to bless us with thy presences and thy podcast.  Amen.

P.S.  And what Barfly said too. ;D

P.S.S.  How about a weekly cooking show podcast?

Not to hijack chefist's standing amongst the masses...but...I would like to be part of his shindig if it comes to fruition.   :)  I would be a great assistant.  :D


Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #123 on: October 01, 2015, 06:30:02 PM »
This was just posted today.  I thought of you, Chefist. ;)

The World of Phil Hendrie: 10/01/15 - Full Show
Phil introduces a new cooking segment with Chef Carl Chodillia. Today’s recipe is for Dodger Duck, in honor of the LA Dodgers clinching the National League West pennant. It can be made with chicken or turkey by the way.  Starts at 7:06.



Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #124 on: October 01, 2015, 07:41:49 PM »
This was just posted today.  I thought of you, Chefist. ;)

The World of Phil Hendrie: 10/01/15 - Full Show
Phil introduces a new cooking segment with Chef Carl Chodillia. Today’s recipe is for Dodger Duck, in honor of the LA Dodgers clinching the National League West pennant. It can be made with chicken or turkey by the way.  Starts at 7:06.


duck dodgers from the 24 1/2 century?

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #125 on: November 08, 2015, 12:14:01 PM »
After curing 5 days, I am now cold smoking (pecan) the pork belly...in 5-6 hours I'll have the first run of "Sonoran Smokehouse" bacon...I'll keep you updated...

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #126 on: November 09, 2015, 10:44:21 AM »
my sausage recipie:
original:
2 teaspoons dried sage
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried marjoram
 
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1 pinch ground cloves
2 pounds ground pork
Directions
In a small, bowl, combine the sage, salt, ground black pepper, marjoram, brown sugar, crushed red pepper and cloves. Mix well.
Place the pork in a large bowl and add the mixed spices to it. Mix well with your hands and form into patties.
Saute the patties in a large skillet over medium high heat for 5 minutes per side, or until internal pork temperature reaches 160 degrees F (73 degrees C).

new recipie:

3 (or 4 if you like)  tablespoon  dried sage
1 tablespoon salt (im not big on salt. add more if you like)
1 tablespoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon fennel seed (optional)
3 tablespoon brown sugar
1-1.5 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (moar if you like it hot)
.5 teaspoon  ground cinnamon
3 pounds ground pork
2 lbs ground turkee

Directions
In a small, bowl, combine the sage, salt, ground black pepper, fennel seed, brown sugar, crushed red pepper and cinnamon. Mix well.
Place the pork in a large bowl and add the mixed spices to it. Mix well with your hands and form into patties.
Saute the patties in a large skillet over medium high heat for 5 minutes per side, or until internal pork temperature reaches 160 degrees F (73 degrees C).
the turkee "loosens" the pork up eliminating the need for more pork fat . im going to try it with 4 lbs pork and 1 lb turkee next  time.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #127 on: November 09, 2015, 10:50:19 AM »
Man that looks very good! Almost the same as mine. I'm lucky enough that I have fresh sage growing year around here in the desert...sage and pork are a match made in heaven!

The turkey addition is very interesting...I'm going to try that! Thanks! It's amazing how much better (and cheaper) sausage is when you make it fresh!

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #128 on: November 09, 2015, 11:06:41 AM »
How did that bacon turn out?

My wife and our oldest child are now completely gluten free. It's expensive and hard to budget some of these special foods.

My question to Mr. Chefist is, for breakfast my wife is switching to sweet potatoes (used to be red potatoes). All I keep doing is making 2 pieces of bacon, and using that rendered fat to cook her sweet potatoes in (with yellow or red onion). She hasn't complained, but if you had any other tips for cooking those in a breakfast-like setting, would be appreciated!

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #129 on: November 09, 2015, 11:11:38 AM »
How did that bacon turn out?

My wife and our oldest child are now completely gluten free. It's expensive and hard to budget some of these special foods.

My question to Mr. Chefist is, for breakfast my wife is switching to sweet potatoes (used to be red potatoes). All I keep doing is making 2 pieces of bacon, and using that rendered fat to cook her sweet potatoes in (with yellow or red onion). She hasn't complained, but if you had any other tips for cooking those in a breakfast-like setting, would be appreciated!

It came out well! Thanks! I need to tweak the next recipe though...the smoke was perfect!

I would bake the sweet potatoes the day before.  Then cool overnight in the fridge...then cut into cubes and cook in the pork fat...I think that will give you the texture that will make the experience much better...

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #130 on: November 09, 2015, 11:18:47 AM »
It came out well! Thanks! I need to tweak the next recipe though...the smoke was perfect!

I would bake the sweet potatoes the day before.  Then cool overnight in the fridge...then cut into cubes and cook in the pork fat...I think that will give you the texture that will make the experience much better...

Interesting; what does baking the day before and cooling in the fridge do?  I tried to make lefse (basically Norwegian potato tortillas) last week and using the potatoes the same day, though chilled, made such a sticky mess I had to use way too much flour to roll them out and they were tough as leather.  I noticed some recipes do as you suggest; is there an actual chemistry reason for this?

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #131 on: November 09, 2015, 11:21:37 AM »
Interesting; what does baking the day before and cooling in the fridge do?  I tried to make lefse (basically Norwegian potato tortillas) last week and using the potatoes the same day, though chilled, made such a sticky mess I had to use way too much flour to roll them out and they were tough as leather.  I noticed some recipes do as you suggest; is there an actual chemistry reason for this?

Whether you boil or bake, always do so "in the jacket", or skin on. That creates a barrier to water and heat...cook until fork tender (baking is 1 hour, boiling 45 min or so)...cool to room them then cool in fridge...

It sets the starch and does not expose it to more water...which will make it waxy and gummy...

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #132 on: November 09, 2015, 11:24:59 AM »
Interesting; what does baking the day before and cooling in the fridge do?  I tried to make lefse (basically Norwegian potato tortillas) last week and using the potatoes the same day, though chilled, made such a sticky mess I had to use way too much flour to roll them out and they were tough as leather.  I noticed some recipes do as you suggest; is there an actual chemistry reason for this?
It might be out of print? But Astrid Karlsen Scott has a good book called "Authentic Norwegian Cooking" with lots of good recipes and hints.
And here is one source I've use, warning opens pdf:
http://www.tokheim-stoneware.com/files/julefest_recipes.pdf
vær så god

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #133 on: November 09, 2015, 11:26:04 AM »
Whether you boil or bake, always do so "in the jacket", or skin on. That creates a barrier to water and heat...cook until fork tender (baking is 1 hour, boiling 45 min or so)...cool to room them then cool in fridge...

It sets the starch and does not expose it to more water...which will make it waxy and gummy...

Understood, and many thanks!

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #134 on: November 09, 2015, 11:28:14 AM »
It might be out of print? But Astrid Karlsen Scott has a good book called "Authentic Norwegian Cooking" with lots of good recipes and hints.
And here is one source I've use, warning opens pdf:
http://www.tokheim-stoneware.com/files/julefest_recipes.pdf
vær så god

Ja, det har jeg.  Mange takk!

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #135 on: November 09, 2015, 11:31:52 AM »
Ja, det har jeg.  Mange takk!
Ingenting å takke for   :)

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #136 on: November 09, 2015, 11:44:55 AM »
Ingenting å takke for   :)

The problem with lefse, or at least potato lefse, is that, though a simple recipe, so much depends on how good you are at rolling (I am poor, though well-equipped, with lefse board, special rolling pin, special griddle, lefse stick to turn) with as little flour as possible, which in turn depends on the specific potatoes you're using, their starchiness and water content.  Most of the recipes call for using flour as needed, which can vary a good deal.

I imagine tortilla bakers have the same challenges.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #137 on: November 09, 2015, 11:48:07 AM »
The problem with lefse, or at least potato lefse, is that, though a simple recipe, so much depends on how good you are at rolling (I am poor, though well-equipped, with lefse board, special rolling pin, special griddle, lefse stick to turn) with as little flour as possible, which in turn depends on the specific potatoes you're using, their starchiness and water content.  Most of the recipes call for using flour as needed, which can vary a good deal.

I imagine tortilla bakers have the same challenges.

Is the potato mashed or shredded? I'm thinking mashed...then bake in the jacket! Have you done that?

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #138 on: November 09, 2015, 11:52:51 AM »
Is the potato mashed or shredded? I'm thinking mashed...then bake in the jacket! Have you done that?

Traditionally boiled in the skin, then riced.  Do you mean mash, put back in and bake?  That would sure dry them out.

My aunt uses instant potatoes; I was trying to be traditional and show her up.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #139 on: November 09, 2015, 12:04:22 PM »
Traditionally boiled in the skin, then riced.  Do you mean mash, put back in and bake?  That would sure dry them out.

My aunt uses instant potatoes; I was trying to be traditional and show her up.

I would bake them in the jacket...then rice...try that! Good luck...

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #140 on: November 09, 2015, 12:13:15 PM »
Oh my, the topic is lefse. My grandparents and family on father's side are from Norway. My grandmother made it all the time during the holidays. I have her recipe and it took a while to come close to mastering if. Actually, my husband does most the cooking and has made it. So very good. I knew popping into this thread would be worth it. And make me hungry.

Also, if you saw the film ( foreign film/Norway)  'Kon Tiki' , it's based off the true story of a family member of mine, Thor Heyerdahl.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #141 on: November 09, 2015, 12:13:58 PM »
Traditionally boiled in the skin, then riced.  Do you mean mash, put back in and bake?  That would sure dry them out.

My aunt uses instant potatoes; I was trying to be traditional and show her up.

If you want her to be amazed at your mashed potatoes, but one tablespoon of sugar in them while mashing.

Old family secret.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #142 on: November 09, 2015, 12:14:29 PM »
I would bake them in the jacket...then rice...try that! Good luck...

Thank you, that makes a lot of sense.

It's funny to listen to the old ladies at the Sons of Norway hall critique the lefse on offer.  Much is dismissed as too thick; it is supposed to be so thin you can read through it, but not rubbery or tough -- i. e. minimal gluten development from the flour.  Imagine doing that with rolled-out potatoes and you will see my dilemma.

The snarkiness of this forum is nothing compared to a bunch of old Norwegian ladies.


Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #143 on: November 09, 2015, 12:16:22 PM »
Thank you, that makes a lot of sense.

It's funny to listen to the old ladies at the Sons of Norway hall critique the lefse on offer.  Much is dismissed as too thick; it is supposed to be so thin you can read through it, but not rubbery or tough -- i. e. minimal gluten development from the flour.  Imagine doing that with rolled-out potatoes and you will see my dilemma.

The snarkiness of this forum is nothing compared to a bunch of old Norwegian ladies.

Also do you use plastic in your press? That is how to make tortillas de maseca...the tortilla is pressed between two pieces of plastic...easier to transport and does not stick...

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #144 on: November 09, 2015, 12:16:26 PM »
Traditionally boiled in the skin, then riced.  Do you mean mash, put back in and bake?  That would sure dry them out.

My aunt uses instant potatoes; I was trying to be traditional and show her up.
I never made so can't vouch but I found this link that explains a bit more than the normal cookbooks. I just known that it takes knowledge and practice, apparently. I just ignored the kitchen while grandma, mom, etc did it! I just watch games and sneak in some more akvavit to fortify myself for the lutefisk. Hahaha. Good luck. (I think the key is, that you already have, is the lefse griddle (hot!) and combating the sticky-ness, hence the cooling prior, flour, ribbed rolling pin, lefse stick, etc.
https://www.ndsu.edu/pubweb/~rcollins/scholarship/makinglefse.html

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #145 on: November 09, 2015, 12:21:23 PM »
Oh my, the topic is lefse. My grandparents and family on father's side are from Norway. My grandmother made it all the time during the holidays. I have her recipe and it took a while to come close to mastering if. Actually, my husband does most the cooking and has made it. So very good. I knew popping into this thread would be worth it. And make me hungry.

Also, if you saw the film ( foreign film/Norway)  'Kon Tiki' , it's based off the true story of a family member of mine, Thor Heyerdahl.

Haha wonderful, I read that when I was a kid; still have it around here somewhere.

You (and your husband) have my infinite respect for mastering it; it's way harder than it looks!

This year I committed an innovation (I know, shocking where tradition is concerned) and rolled up with butter, sugar, and cardamom instead of the usual cinnamon.  Man, that stuff is like crack.  Takes me right back to grandma's house.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #146 on: November 09, 2015, 12:25:23 PM »
Also do you use plastic in your press? That is how to make tortillas de maseca...the tortilla is pressed between two pieces of plastic...easier to transport and does not stick...

You know, that makes a lot of sense, and I'm willing to try anything.  But the equipment for making it is sacrosanct, I will do it with trepidation lest a host of bestemors descend upon me in anger.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #147 on: November 09, 2015, 12:32:24 PM »
Haha wonderful, I read that when I was a kid; still have it around here somewhere.

You (and your husband) have my infinite respect for mastering it; it's way harder than it looks!

This year I committed an innovation (I know, shocking where tradition is concerned) and rolled up with butter, sugar, and cardamom instead of the usual cinnamon.  Man, that stuff is like crack.  Takes me right back to grandma's house.

When my husband first attempted to make it, I walked in the door to find the kitchen covered in flour. Even our Dachshund was covered in flour. Hahaha

But yeah... This thread is warming my heart and missing my family. Sweet memories flooding back to my grandma's house. Thank you. As the Holidays are approaching, I'm trying not to get in a funk and I needed this. Thanks, guys.

Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #148 on: November 09, 2015, 12:34:19 PM »
many use ziplock bags for ease of transport and release onto the cooking surface...


Re: Cooking With Chefist!
« Reply #149 on: November 09, 2015, 12:57:16 PM »
I never made so can't vouch but I found this link that explains a bit more than the normal cookbooks. I just known that it takes knowledge and practice, apparently. I just ignored the kitchen while grandma, mom, etc did it! I just watch games and sneak in some more akvavit to fortify myself for the lutefisk. Hahaha. Good luck. (I think the key is, that you already have, is the lefse griddle (hot!) and combating the sticky-ness, hence the cooling prior, flour, ribbed rolling pin, lefse stick, etc.
https://www.ndsu.edu/pubweb/~rcollins/scholarship/makinglefse.html

Haha you have not had my lutefisk:  no fortifying necessary!

For years I was happy leaving the kitchen to the ladies but now if I don't make it, I don't get it.  So far I've mastered hveteboller, skoleboller, fattigmenn, krumkaker, and lussekatter.  And, without boasting, my julekake is better than Grandma's -- cardamom and saffron and my own syltet gresskar in it.  But the lefse is the hardest of all.

Brings back so many memories, or, in the spirit of this forum, conjures the spirits of the ancestors like nothing else.