Author Science under siege  (Read 3956 times)

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Re: Science under siege
« Reply #30 on: June 10, 2015, 05:05:43 PM »
Other states could self-publish or buy other textbooks but the big states, like Texas, bring the price down. I'm surprised, in this day and age, that more schools having gone to something like an e-reader (or tablet) one would think it would be much easier to make their own text 'book' or use original source documents. Of course, the big publishers and authors of textbooks wouldn't like that! How many times were you told get Dr.Phibe's 4th Edition for this class in the syllabus. Shell out a ridiculous amount for a book and it contained, pretty much, the same information as the previous editions but Dr.Phibe's, who happens to be your professor, gets some more books sales. Why haven't at least universities gone "e" for their books (maybe they have?)

I haven't been in school for 10 years. In the last decade a great deal has changed. I think e-readers are brilliant idea. I am sure though, monied interests are heavily invested in the continuation of publishing hard copies. And honestly, it is a tough decision, printing employs a huge number of people. And paper is a huge commodity.

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #31 on: June 10, 2015, 05:11:19 PM »
I haven't been in school for 10 years. In the last decade a great deal has changed. I think e-readers are brilliant idea. I am sure though, monied interests are heavily invested in the continuation of publishing hard copies. And honestly, it is a tough decision, printing employs a huge number of people. And paper is a huge commodity.
Been quite a bit longer for me since I was in school  ;) but I'm sure you are right that things must have changed some. Besides, as you mention the employment and industry associated with textbooks, I must say personally I like real books over e-readers- at least as they stand now. I'm sure if is only a matter of mastering the newer technology but, at least on my old kindle, is harder to "go back" or "skip ahead" to a section, read an end-note or reference, etc than it is on a real book. And with real books you can have multiple sources out at once whilst studying. But cost-savings and convenience for the kids it would seem to make sense, at least in lower grades (some schools now don't have lockers- safety concerns) and kids have to carry around like 50lbs of books with them everywhere. I think it might even cause back problems in smaller kids.

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #32 on: June 11, 2015, 12:47:04 AM »
The fact that it happened makes it true. The fact that pseudo-science was and is being taught does make it effectual. And I get the distinct impression that you are minimizing, perhaps I am wrong.

I don't follow this topic with any amount of consistency, but I do know that the money spent on text books in Texas has a dramatic effect on the publishing of text books in other states due primarily to the number and monies that are spent in Texas.

Minimizing? No, I just realize that there are people in the world with whom I disagree, who have equal rights to seek to impose their views through the political system (which weirdly governs the educational system in the USA). I also know that I am the parent of my numerous children, and their learning is up to me. I cannot expect the public schools to accommodate our peculiarities, so my children attend private schools, suitable to our beliefs and backgrounds. The public schools attempt to make everyone happy and only succeed in making no one happy, and you are the first person I have ever heard describe them as "effectual."  ;D

It may be true that Texas has an inordinate influence on textbook publishing due to the size of the market, but that is to be expected. I have never read one of these textbooks, so I cannot judge its quality or lack thereof. For my area of expertise, public schools are actually very good. You would be surprised how effectual that hour of practice every school day is for future musicians, even more if they attend band practice or orchestra or choir.


Re: Science under siege
« Reply #33 on: June 11, 2015, 01:02:38 AM »
Why haven't at least universities gone "e" for their books (maybe they have?)

It's not the universities per se that have gone "e," but giant retailers, like Amazon, who decided to grab a cut (leading to eventual dominance) of lucrative textbook sales. Not only do they sell the hardcover versions for less (sometimes pennies on the dollar for 'foreign' printings), but they offer e-versions and rentals in both formats.

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #34 on: June 11, 2015, 01:47:01 AM »
Minimizing? No, I just realize that there are people in the world with whom I disagree, who have equal rights to seek to impose their views through the political system (which weirdly governs the educational system in the USA)

I actually disagree with this.  If someone is going to teach science, it should only be based on what is generally accepted science and not on pseudo science that people may happen to believe largely because it fits into their religious views.

The democratic 'rights' of the parents should in no way trump their children's right to get a proper education.

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #35 on: June 11, 2015, 01:52:14 PM »
I actually disagree with this.  If someone is going to teach science, it should only be based on what is generally accepted science and not on pseudo science that people may happen to believe largely because it fits into their religious views.

The democratic 'rights' of the parents should in no way trump their children's right to get a proper education.

Oh, I don't really think this is much of an issue, but then, I am in the process of educating seven children and one Canadian son-in-law. If something is taught with which we disagree, we talk about it. There are only a few, minimal areas in which "religious" issues have any bearing on science matters. I'm sure that curricula are designed to quickly brush over it all, i.e., "Some people believe blah, blah, blah, but in this biology class we will focus on evolution as it is understood scientifically." There are instances in which individual teachers may have dwelt improperly on the subject, or so I've heard, and there may be instances in which curricula have been perverted to base ends, but it doesn't take long for people to light their hair on fire and slug it out (some people enjoy that sort of thing more than the actual issue at hand). I think the problems facing most public schools have more to do with controlling the environment and the behavioral issues so that any learning can take place at all. For the gifted, there are "magnet" schools which feature the sciences or performing arts, etc., and many of the classes offered in these schools award college credits. There's Teach for America (is there a Canadian counterpart?) for those who want to back up their principles with action. My choice has been to remove my children from public schools, not because they might be exposed to some passing pseudo-science, but because of the improper environment that most schools offer.

The democratic rights of people to force others to their way of thinking is problematic, certainly. I happen to be of a highly skeptical nature and I find many pseudo-scientific beliefs comical in the extreme (as anyone knows who has read my writings on this site). However, I also recognize that I don't know everything and that scientific understanding can be hidebound and foolish. It is not a pure pursuit, no more than any other human endeavor. The scientific method is merely a tool, albeit a very good one, for its purpose. Yet, the broad application of the supposed "Findings of Science," is wrong. I'll give you an example.

My people perform the rite of circumcision. In Europe, attempts have been made to ban circumcision on "scientific" grounds, dragging in ridiculous psuedo-scientific psychological arguments that even the highly, horrifically pseudo-scientific Freud would have found baseless (circumcision is not 'holistic,' don'cha know). Although the overwhelming number of Europeans are not even affected by circumcision, and have perfectly free choice to ignore it, they wish to impose their beliefs on a very small minority population. I sincerely doubt that their motive is Science. Of course, we should not forget that there is also "science" which indicates that circumcision is beneficial. So, which is it? Who decides? May I offer you a glass of fluoridated water?


Re: Science under siege
« Reply #36 on: June 15, 2015, 07:28:23 PM »
When I was in school in Florida all the colleges I attended , the book stores were Barnes and Noble operations. It would be simple to just give (sell) the student a Nook and load his course books on it. Neat ,clean and no trees died. That would have been nice. When I went to school for my BA  the one electronic calculator in the statistics lab had nixie tubes for a read out and cost the school $5000 1968 dollars every lab was done on old Monroe mechanical electric calculators that weighed abot 25 pounds.

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #37 on: July 25, 2015, 01:33:56 PM »
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/environment/globalwarming/11762680/Three-scientists-investigating-melting-Arctic-ice-may-have-been-assassinated-professor-claims.html
It is the "consensus" of opinion that scientists are being murdered and targeted. Just ask Steve Quayle and this Global Warming Cambridge Professor!

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #38 on: July 25, 2015, 03:18:07 PM »
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/environment/globalwarming/11762680/Three-scientists-investigating-melting-Arctic-ice-may-have-been-assassinated-professor-claims.html


Quote
Asked who might have wanted them out the way, he replied: “I can only think of the oil lobby but I don’t think the oil lobby goes around killing people.”

No wonder they left him alive. What a terrible scientist.

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #39 on: July 26, 2015, 01:06:02 AM »
I actually disagree with this.  If someone is going to teach science, it should only be based on what is generally accepted science and not on pseudo science that people may happen to believe largely because it fits into their religious views.

The democratic 'rights' of the parents should in no way trump their children's right to get a proper education.

The "generally accepted science" at the time that Columbus discovered North America was that the world was flat...

The "generally accepted science" in Galileo's day was that the Sun rotated around the Earth, and they threatened to kill Galileo if he didn't shut up.

Pope Paul V instructed Cardinal Bellarmine to deliver this finding to Galileo, and to order him to abandon opinion that heliocentrism was physically true. On 26 February, Galileo was called to Bellarmine's residence and ordered

... to abandon completely... the opinion that the sun stands still at the center of the world and the earth moves, and henceforth not to hold, teach, or defend it in any way whatever, either orally or in writing.

—The Inquisition's injunction against Galileo, 1616.[67]

They sound like liberal democrats to me...

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #40 on: July 26, 2015, 01:07:26 AM »
The "generally accepted science" at the time that Columbus discovered North America was that the world was flat...

The "generally accepted science" in Galileo's day was that the Sun rotated around the Earth, and they threatened to kill Galileo if he didn't shut up.

Pope Paul V instructed Cardinal Bellarmine to deliver this finding to Galileo, and to order him to abandon opinion that heliocentrism was physically true. On 26 February, Galileo was called to Bellarmine's residence and ordered

... to abandon completely... the opinion that the sun stands still at the center of the world and the earth moves, and henceforth not to hold, teach, or defend it in any way whatever, either orally or in writing.

—The Inquisition's injunction against Galileo, 1616.[67]

They sound like liberal democrats to me...

You're demented though.

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #41 on: July 26, 2015, 01:19:29 AM »
The "generally accepted science" at the time that Columbus discovered North America was that the world was flat...

you do know that isn't true? right?  ::)  ;D

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #42 on: July 26, 2015, 01:21:29 AM »
you do know that isn't true? right?  ::)  ;D

shhhhhh....




Re: Science under siege
« Reply #46 on: July 26, 2015, 01:35:13 AM »



Have you permission to reproduce the Texan school science curriculum?

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #47 on: July 26, 2015, 03:29:47 AM »


It kinda looks fake when you put it in a loop like that.

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #48 on: July 26, 2015, 08:33:26 AM »
It kinda looks fake when you put it in a loop like that.

I thought that Shatner was the King of Fake?

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #49 on: July 26, 2015, 08:37:01 AM »


Ok, ok, so, "some people" still thought the world was flat and he would sail right of the edge of the Earth, just like "some people" still think that White, non-liberal people, only in America, really want to bring slavery back...

The fact is - it's same kind of stupid shit promulgated by assholes that does more to hold societies back than to advance any cause, and it always seems to come from the "elite, intellectually superior, science-based assholes" in any given society.

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #50 on: July 26, 2015, 09:22:22 AM »
I thought that Shatner was the King of Fake?

No, that was your last girlfriend.  Then she turned 16 and realized she could do a hell of a lot better than you.

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #51 on: July 26, 2015, 10:37:45 AM »
No, that was your last girlfriend.  Then she turned 16 and realized she could do a hell of a lot better than you.

My wife and son from a little less than 2-years ago. Eat your heart out, asshole.


Re: Science under siege
« Reply #52 on: July 26, 2015, 10:39:21 AM »
My wife and son from a little less than 2-years ago. Eat your heart out, asshole.



Hey! I got one of those on my new picture frame too!  That's great!

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #53 on: July 26, 2015, 10:40:46 AM »
Hey! I got one of those on my new picture frame too!  That's great!

Douchebag.

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #54 on: July 26, 2015, 11:02:05 AM »
My wife and son from a little less than 2-years ago. Eat your heart out, asshole.



Oh you're good. She hasn't sussed you're a misogynist and use 'woman' as a pejorative term? Course she's your missus. Best laugh all day.

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #55 on: July 26, 2015, 11:09:39 AM »
The world thought is was only microbiologists, chemical weapons experts, nuclear scientists (particularly of an Asian bent,) 911 "scholars" and "experts," chem-trail "researchers," and inventors of "zero point energy" and "combustion engines that run on water"-- but now we can include global-warming scientists in the groups of murdered scientists!
Steve Quayle, Jeff Rense, The Iranians, Alex Jones, global warming adherents, all agree: stop killing our scientists!
http://blogs.news.com.au/dailytelegraph/andrewbolt/index.php/dailytelegraph/comments/latest_global_warming_theory_sceptics_murder_climate_scientists/

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #56 on: July 26, 2015, 11:19:24 AM »
Ok, ok, so, "some people" still thought the world was flat and he would sail right of the edge of the Earth...

i understand what you were saying. what i wanted to point out is that it's a myth that The "generally accepted science" at the time that Columbus discovered North America was that the world was flat...

your previous response made for a great opportunity to post the Capt. Kirk gif taken from STTOS episode Plato's Stepchildren.  ;D

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #57 on: July 26, 2015, 11:49:25 AM »
i understand what you were saying. what i wanted to point out is that it's a myth that The "generally accepted science" at the time that Columbus discovered North America was that the world was flat...

your previous response made for a great opportunity to post the Capt. Kirk gif taken from STTOS episode Plato's Stepchildren.  ;D

I understood your intentions completely! I just wish you could have waited a bit longer before you yanked the bait out of the trap!  8)

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #58 on: July 26, 2015, 05:37:12 PM »
The "generally accepted science" at the time that Columbus discovered North America was that the world was flat...

The "generally accepted science" in Galileo's day was that the Sun rotated around the Earth, and they threatened to kill Galileo if he didn't shut up.

Pope Paul V instructed Cardinal Bellarmine to deliver this finding to Galileo, and to order him to abandon opinion that heliocentrism was physically true. On 26 February, Galileo was called to Bellarmine's residence and ordered

... to abandon completely... the opinion that the sun stands still at the center of the world and the earth moves, and henceforth not to hold, teach, or defend it in any way whatever, either orally or in writing.

—The Inquisition's injunction against Galileo, 1616.[67]

They sound like liberal democrats to me...
Yeah, people who base their belief systems on religion - popes, conservatives, whatever - tend to not agree with scientific progress.  They always end up being wrong, though, don't they Karl?  Thanks for illustrating it so well.

Re: Science under siege
« Reply #59 on: July 26, 2015, 09:35:45 PM »
My wife and son from a little less than 2-years ago. Eat your heart out, asshole.




She looks a little young. Who's the blonde?