Author Topic: Ebola  (Read 73884 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

I know I got shitfaced on cider at 14... I still recall standing at the top of these stairs and being too hammered to stop myself from falling. So what I did was fall down these stairs...




Bottom line is that (in my opinion) you need to socialise, you need to learn, and you need to be encouraged to do both from an early age.  I'll be delighted if my son comes home one day and tells me how he just fell down a big-assed flight of stone stairs in the historical part of the city thanks to illegally imbibing large quantities of cheap alcohol with a group of friends.





Whats that?

And really, it would be good if we can spread the virus around.  More sick people would mean more opportunities for compassion!  We should all hug an Ebola patient.  Because compassion is more important than risk.  Do you hear yourself in these arguments?

Meanwhile, back in Lagos.

“This cluster of cases in Lagos, Nigeria is very concerning,” said Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Controls and Prevention, which is dispatching 50 experienced disease control specialists to West Africa."

“It shows what happens if meticulous infection control, contact tracing, and proper isolation of patients with suspected Ebola is not done. Stopping the spread in Lagos will be difficult but it can be done,” he said."

http://atlanta.cbslocal.com/2014/08/05/doctor-ebola-outbreak-is-spinning-out-of-control/


And really, it would be good if we can spread the virus around.  More sick people would mean more opportunities for compassion!  We should all hug an Ebola patient.  Because compassion is more important than risk.  Do you hear yourself in these arguments?


..and hyperbole is far more constructive when it comes to giving yours substance. I know it's wasted on you, but I would think the repatriation is less to do with compassion, and more to do with practicalities and efficacy. But hey, I don't have your world view of things, I could be wrong, and so could the medics dealing with them.


Alas someone was one-step way ahead of me and www.ebola.com is already up (but the domain is for sale.) .Org, .Net, and .info are just place-holders. At least the .com guy put up a little info. Now, have the Carnivora, or other, hawksters on C2C and the like made any claims regarding Ebola yet? Or maybe Colloidal Silver? I'm sure someone is going to ride this wave of paranoia for a cheap buck.

I did forget to mention the profiting of a cure aside hospital costs. You beat me at that.

Death toll update 887 as of this morning.

Death toll update 887 as of this morning.


Is that high?

I think it is tremendous that you're taking an interest in educating the kids in your family, because the failure in the education system can really only be addressed in the home.  The government is never going to go back to teaching people how to think for themselves, or ask questions... it's down to the individual schmuck like ourselves to ensure that our kids don't grow up to be mindless muppets, sitting watching Keeping Up With The Kardashians, or Survivor.

If it makes you feel any better about US education, the name Justin Bieber has forever been banned from my classroom.

Really good dedicated teachers will teach kids to think for themselves in spite of bureaucracy, educational fads, and the interference of administrators. I can count on one hand the teachers in my life who did, but they made a profound difference.

So Ebola is killing people at a rate somewhere between Struck by Lightning and Autoerotic Asphyxiation.

At this rate the human race can expect to be wiped out never.


So Ebola is killing people at a rate somewhere between Struck by Lightning and Autoerotic Asphyxiation.

At this rate the human race can expect to be wiped out never.



As Unscreened Caller said a page ago:

Quote
What the media doesn't say is that of a combined population of 178,000,000 people in Sierra Leone, Nigeria and Liberia, somewhere between 900 and 1200 have died from Ebola. To put that into perspective, during the 2009 H1N1 flu epidemic which closed a lot of schools in the area including mine, the deaths from flu ranged,  in the US with a population of 305,000,000, between 9,000 and 18,000.


Is that high?
50-60 deaths in 2 days is high if you consider the much lower numbers a month ago. The death rate is steadily increasing.

Take the smallest of those countries, Sierra Leone at 4.4 million people. Are 50-60 deaths in two days statistically high? That's 25-30 deaths in a day. How many AIDs related deaths are there in a day? Or heart disease or any other potentially fatal disease?

60/4,000,000 = 0.000015th of the population, 15 millionth of the population, assuming we're talking about just Sierra Leone

If we're talking about all three countries it's 60/178,000,000 = 3.37078652e-7 which is statistically insignificant


If we're talking about all three countries it's 60/178,000,000 = 3.37078652e-7 which is statistically insignificant

But scary.


Things I have heard or read on ebola today:
1. CDC has a patent  on some strain of ebola.
2. They have been testing a monoclonal antibody derived from some strain of Kentucky Tobacco(burley) on monkeys infected with ebola with great success.
3. Human testing was to begin in September but the two flown to Atlanta were injected with it  already and the first one that arrived in Atlanta was able to be up this morning and take a shower.

How many AIDs related deaths are there in a day?
The only thing ebola seems to have in common with AIDS is that back in the early 80s the epidemiologists also said it wouldn't spread (beyond gays) because it requires contact with body fluids.


Aids also kills over years of time, which allows it to be transmitted more. This kills in less than a month from infection, and unlike AIDs this can be transmitted just by touch, or close contact during it's  show of symptoms.
Not to mention this particular outbreak is recent, and not even close to being controlled according to the CDC. If anything this current outbreak is chaotic and not to be under minded.

I'm not about to put on a tin foil hat and preach, but unless there is a promising cure in the making I'm not going to feel at ease of this shit blowing into a full blown global pandemic.

The only thing ebola seems to have in common with AIDS is that back in the early 80s the epidemiologists also said it wouldn't spread (beyond gays) because it requires contact with body fluids.
Yeah. Do we stilk refuse blood donations by people from, or have visited certain countries? I know we used. And I know the "gay mafia" is agitating that they should be allowed to donate. Do we screen blood supply for ebola? Recall problems with HIV n Hepatitus in past. Like the Clinton era Arkansas prison blood for sale scandal that hurt n killed so many. Could you imagine if ebola got into our supply?

Things I have heard or read on ebola today:

They have been testing a monoclonal antibody derived from some strain of Kentucky Tobacco(burley) on monkeys infected with ebola with great success.


Do a Google search on the following companies:

Map Pharmaceuticals, Inc. - This is the company that they reported made the serum.  It was recently acquired by Allergan, Inc.

Kentucky BioProcessing, LLC - This is the company that is deriving the monoclonal antibodies used in the serum from specially injected tobacco plants.  Their company is in Owensboro, KY.

Reynolds American Inc. - Kentucky BioProcessing was recently divested to this company.  Reynolds American Inc. is the second biggest tobacco company in America, i.e., BIG TOBACCO.

Do a Google search on the following companies:

Map Pharmaceuticals, Inc. - This is the company that they reported made the serum.  It was recently acquired by Allergan, Inc.

Kentucky BioProcessing, LLC - This is the company that is deriving the monoclonal antibodies used in the serum from specially injected tobacco plants.  Their company is in Owensboro, KY.

Reynolds American Inc. - Kentucky BioProcessing was recently divested to this company.  Reynolds American Inc. is the second biggest tobacco company in America, i.e., BIG TOBACCO.

If a pandemic does break out will the choice be the virus or lung cancer?

Discuss.

The only thing ebola seems to have in common with AIDS is that back in the early 80s the epidemiologists also said it wouldn't spread (beyond gays) because it requires contact with body fluids.

AIDS has decimated the African subcontinent and continues to. Twenty five million people in Africa are affected with AIDs in sub Sahara. This is an example of a true epidemic and sadly, one that could have been prevented. It spread throughout the heterosexual population like wildfire partly because of a cultural resistance to the use of condoms, and in part, because of substandard education coupled with fear, superstition and a lack of decent medical care. Outside the body, the HIV virus is fragile, which might not be the case with the Ebola virus.

Do a Google search on the following companies:

Map Pharmaceuticals, Inc. - This is the company that they reported made the serum.  It was recently acquired by Allergan, Inc.

Kentucky BioProcessing, LLC - This is the company that is deriving the monoclonal antibodies used in the serum from specially injected tobacco plants.  Their company is in Owensboro, KY.

Reynolds American Inc. - Kentucky BioProcessing was recently divested to this company.  Reynolds American Inc. is the second biggest tobacco company in America, i.e., BIG TOBACCO.


There`s no money in producing vaccines.

There goes that CT.

AIDS has decimated the African subcontinent and continues to. Twenty five million people in Africa are affected with AIDs in sub Sahara. This is an example of a true epidemic and sadly, one that could have been prevented. It spread throughout the heterosexual population like wildfire partly because of a cultural resistance to the use of condoms, and in part, because of substandard education coupled with fear, superstition and a lack of decent medical care. Outside the body, the HIV virus is fragile, which might not be the case with the Ebola virus.

I consider Africa`s plight with AIDS as one of the great tragedies of the modern era. Thank God  George W. Bush took the aggressive action he did to help stem the  tide of senseless death sweeping that magnificent continent.


There`s no money in producing vaccines.

There goes that CT.
I'm not so sure about that. Maybe the profit margin would not be as good as, say, producing "little blue pills" for men's inferiority complexes, but profits can be made from vaccines by the volume and when governments buy it or demand it. And, remember, the manufacturers are indemnified against any liability that might be caused by the vaccine. And they don't have to spend ANY money on marketing and advertising because the government and news will spread the word, in very alarming ways, about the disease and need to get a vaccine.

I'm not so sure about that. Maybe the profit margin would not be as good as, say, producing "little blue pills" for men's inferiority complexes, but profits can be made from vaccines by the volume and when governments buy it or demand it. And, remember, the manufacturers are indemnified against any liability that might be caused by the vaccine. And they don't have to spend ANY money on marketing and advertising because the government and news will spread the word, in very alarming ways, about the disease and need to get a vaccine.


No need for any government to 'spread the word'. The net is full of forums such as this saying how the sky is falling in, matched by those who say vaccines shouldn't ever be administered because magic, angels and belief (or and any number of alternative crap) will mend things.

I consider Africa`s plight with AIDS as one of the great tragedies of the modern era. Thank God  George W. Bush took the aggressive action he did to help stem the  tide of senseless death sweeping that magnificent continent.
HA!  AIDS in Africa is Bush's fault.  That's rich.

I am pretty sure FTF is serious... Bush did spend focus and dollars on AIDS in sub-Suharan Africa, yes?  It is one of the things he did I applaud.

I am pretty sure FTF is serious... Bush did spend focus and dollars on AIDS in sub-Suharan Africa, yes?  It is one of the things he did I applaud.


But Bush was fighting a losing battle; As UC said, there is superstition, lack of education, lack of widespread healthcare in many of the 54 African countries, belief that condoms are evil (Backed up by religious indoctrination), and also the dreadful belief by some backward 'men' that raping children will cure them. Even the South African president until recently refused to acknowledge there was a HIV problem. Maybe because he shags anything that moves anyway.

I am pretty sure FTF is serious... Bush did spend focus and dollars on AIDS in sub-Suharan Africa, yes?  It is one of the things he did I applaud.

Oh, my mistake.  Apologies all around.
My sarcasm meter detected snark.  I'll have to have this thing checked out...

[attachimg=1]

Say what you will about W, but he is responsible for saving millions of lives in Africa. As a world leader, his dedication -- which continues to this day -- to  bettering Africans` lives is unparalleled in the history of the world.

http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2013/07/they-miss-bush-in-africa.php