Author Topic: Ebola  (Read 74303 times)

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Is there a reason why you type like this? Double-spacing every sentence? Fuck its annoying.

Yeah, it's to annoy the wankers.

Anybody who travels to Africa or any third world nation, whether it's for humanitarian reasons or not, knows the risks they are taking.  But it's their life they play with.  By bringing him here, it's not just his life we are playing with any longer.  Viruses don't care if you are compassionate or not.  Perhaps he should have been taken to your house and you could feed him some chicken soup?

Nice.

YP has you figured out though.

Anybody who travels to Africa or any third world nation, whether it's for humanitarian reasons or not, knows the risks they are taking.  But it's their life they play with.  By bringing him here, it's not just his life we are playing with any longer.  Viruses don't care if you are compassionate or not.  Perhaps he should have been taken to your house and you could feed him some chicken soup?

You say he shouldn't have been taken to the USA, but you haven't suggested what he should have done.

It is interesting that you make much of this doctor who has been repatriated to the US for treatment in an isolation unit that will be sealed from the rest of the hospital let alone the rest of Atlanta. He's being cared for by medics who will be fully protected and trained in dealing with this sort of incident. The chances of you, anyone you know, or don't know in the US being infected by this doctor is less than you being eaten by a great white you find in your bath.



It's interesting because your chances of being murdered by someone who has had no psychology testing and can legally hold a firearm is very many more times higher. That's playing with a lot of peoples lives. Stray bullets don't care who they hit, they're not compassionate at all. 


You say he shouldn't have been taken to the USA, but you haven't suggested what he should have done.

It is interesting that you make much of this doctor who has been repatriated to the US for treatment in an isolation unit that will be sealed from the rest of the hospital let alone the rest of Atlanta. He's being cared for by medics who will be fully protected and trained in dealing with this sort of incident. The chances of you, anyone you know, or don't know in the US being infected by this doctor is less than you being eaten by a great white you find in your bath.



It's interesting because your chances of being murdered by someone who has had no psychology testing and can legally hold a firearm is very many more times higher. That's playing with a lot of peoples lives. Stray bullets don't care who they hit, they're not compassionate at all.
A true Brit.  Comparing gun control to Ebola outbreaks.  Brilliant.


A true Brit.  Comparing gun control to Ebola outbreaks.  Brilliant.


I'm comparing risk...So which do you think will be more risk to you at this time? Roughly?


You still didn't say how the doc should have been treated though.

You say he shouldn't have been taken to the USA, but you haven't suggested what he should have done.

It is interesting that you make much of this doctor who has been repatriated to the US for treatment in an isolation unit that will be sealed from the rest of the hospital let alone the rest of Atlanta. He's being cared for by medics who will be fully protected and trained in dealing with this sort of incident. The chances of you, anyone you know, or don't know in the US being infected by this doctor is less than you being eaten by a great white you find in your bath.



It's interesting because your chances of being murdered by someone who has had no psychology testing and can legally hold a firearm is very many more times higher. That's playing with a lot of peoples lives. Stray bullets don't care who they hit, they're not compassionate at all.

well the risk of being shot by a person that legally obtained the weapon is many times higher than any US citizen catching ebola at this time.
however, your risk of dying in a hospital due to malpractice and/or preventable medical errors is many times higher than being killed by a firearm, legally obtained or not, in the US is much lower.
210,000 on average yearly from hospital preventable errors, and 32,351 (2011 stats) deaths from gunshot (includes all gun deaths, suicide, self defense, violent crime, accidental ,etc).
so pick your poison, you have to die from something. death and taxes are the only 2 constants in life.

as far as safety goes concerning the patients in the US, that is debatable with anthrax going airborne at the CDC and vials of smallpox discovered in a closet, provides much needed comfort that the ebola cases will be handled properly.

Six vials of potentially deadly smallpox virus have been discovered in a place they shouldn’t have been — an unused corner of a storage room at a Food and Drug Administration laboratory in Maryland, federal health officials said Tuesday.

It's the second lab lapse discovered in a month at federal facilities, though this mistake actually happened decades ago, experts emphasized. In June, more than 80 employees at a Centers for Disease Control laboratory were exposed to airborne anthrax bacteria in an embarrassing blunder.


/*edit*/ corrected nooryisms

well the risk of being shot by a person that legally obtained the weapon is many times higher than any us citizen catching ebola at this time.
however, your risk of dying in a hospital due to malpractice and/or preventable medical errors many times higher than being killed by a firearm, legally obtained or not, in the US is much lower.
210,000 on average yearly from hospital preventable errors, and 32,351 (2011 stats) deaths from gunshot (includes all gun deaths, suicide, self defense, violent crime, accidental ,etc).
so pick your poison, you have to die from something. death and taxes are the only 2 constants in life.


32000 with firearms? Wow... Ebola deaths?

Malpractice is big business too, lots of lawyers depend on it. Mind you you're better off without it.

But Ebola is way way down the list; yet seems to be generating quite a bit of panic without evidence to justify it. And someone to assemble a poster with Obama in the back of his presidential car to imply he's the culprit is frankly ludicrous. 


32000 with firearms? Wow... Ebola deaths?

0 ebola deaths in the US at this time. i believe i pointed that out
Quote
well the risk of being shot by a person that legally obtained the weapon is many times higher than any us citizen catching ebola at this time.

Quote
Malpractice is big business too, lots of lawyers depend on it. Mind you you're better off without it.

But Ebola is way way down the list; yet seems to be generating quite a bit of panic without evidence to justify it. And someone to assemble a poster with Obama in the back of his presidential car to imply he's the culprit is frankly ludicrous. 

yes ebola always generates a large amount of mindless panic. you have to note many thing things about ebola, the very 1st is it occurs in a very poor part of the world. these people are often malnourished to begin with, which dramatically lowers the chance of surviving ebola. often there are secondary infections, or even the ebola is a secondary infection (things like cholera and e.coli run rampant there, due to poor or no sanitation).
   

Just in case here is a map for you.
http://www.cdc.gov/quarantine/quarantine-stations-us.html
CDC has the legal authority to detain any person who may have an infectious disease that is specified by Executive Order to be quarantinable.


But Ebola is way way down the list; yet seems to be generating quite a bit of panic without evidence to justify it.

I haven't witnessed any panic. I've seen concern that maybe this wasn't the best idea. I guess time will tell.

Just in case here is a map for you.
http://www.cdc.gov/quarantine/quarantine-stations-us.html
CDC has the legal authority to detain any person who may have an infectious disease that is specified by Executive Order to be quarantinable.


Yes, that's the same all over the western world. All notifiable diseases are subject to similar regs.


0 ebola deaths in the US at this time. i believe i pointed that out
yes ebola always generates a large amount of mindless panic. you have to note many thing things about ebola, the very 1st is it occurs in a very poor part of the world. these people are often malnourished to begin with, which dramatically lowers the chance of surviving ebola. often there are secondary infections, or even the ebola is a secondary infection (things like cholera and e.coli run rampant there, due to poor or no sanitation).
   

Yes. Added to it in the African countries they have the superstition and denial.

Just in case here is a map for you.
http://www.cdc.gov/quarantine/quarantine-stations-us.html
CDC has the legal authority to detain any person who may have an infectious disease that is specified by Executive Order to be quarantinable.

actually any police officer can do that under "danger to the public and/or themselves" . they can force you to a hospital via ambulance, and charge you with whatever they can dream up. a judge can hold you there indefinitely under the same clause.   


What you mean is I think is: I don't give a shit about anyone but me, because when it comes down to it, only I matter. Fuck him.

So I have no compassion, eh? 
Why it seems like only yesterday you were advocating shooting drug addicts in the head. 

Doctors and nurses in US and UK hospitals that have to also cater for the asswipes of the world also get attacked by non Ebola carrying drunken, drugged up fucks. They should get the bullet, but not because they're afraid, but because they're fucks.

My compassion lies in the fact that I think it would be best for everyone if any infected people were treated within the confines of the quarantine zone of the outbreak.  I would like it very much if zero more people were to die from Ebola.  It was noble to bring him home to the US for treatment, almost as noble as his Christianity driven efforts to help the poor people of Africa, but it was a risky and cavalier move that has endangered a new set of healthcare workers unnecessarily.  I'm not panicked, but I find the situation troubling.  I also find it interesting that the same people who say "America has the worst healthcare system in the world" now suddenly seem to believe that the USA healthcare system is uniquely superior and qualified and obviously the best place to treat a US citizen with Ebola. 



I haven't witnessed any panic. I've seen concern that maybe this wasn't the best idea. I guess time will tell.

Wait until you see the first couple of deaths, hell, the first couple of confirmed cases, in the US, and watch the media and the public piss their pants like herd animals who just saw a lion.

So I have no compassion, eh? 
Why it seems like only yesterday you were advocating shooting drug addicts in the head. 

And drunks. The ones who attack medical staff. I might compromise and allow them to be thrown in a pit outside the hospital until they sober up..Okay, a pit with a foot of dog shit in the bottom.. I can't say fairer than that.


Quote
My compassion lies in the fact that I think it would be best for everyone if any infected people were treated within the confines of the quarantine zone of the outbreak.  I would like it very much if zero more people were to die from Ebola.  It was noble to bring him home to the US for treatment, almost as noble as his Christianity driven efforts to help the poor people of Africa, but it was a risky and cavalier move that has endangered a new set of healthcare workers unnecessarily.  I'm not panicked, but I find the situation troubling.  I also find it interesting that the same people who say "America has the worst healthcare system in the world" now suddenly seem to believe that the USA healthcare system is uniquely superior and qualified and obviously the best place to treat a US citizen with Ebola.


In Africa, his chances of any treatment are severely limited. The reason he's been taken to where he's been taken is because there's a specific unit that is geared to what he will need. He's a US citizen going back home to be treated, but because he's got Ebola you'd prefer he not be repatriated and then you can sleep easier at night.. I bet tonight you're glad you're you and not him.

Who has said that America has the worst healthcare system in the world? I think what has been said, is it isn't open for everyone to use unless they can pay for it. Not the same thing. It's also quite inefficient in relation to capital expenditure, but that isn't really relevant to the Ebola case.

Edit:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-28631777

Here are the highlights.

Caption to a photo.

Kent Brantly (right) insisted the only serum available go to a colleague.       I don't know about anyone else, but if he isn't owed a flight home, what is?

Quote
A senior US health official said the outbreak was out of control but insisted it could be stopped.

Ebola has claimed 728 lives in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone this year. The current mortality rate is about 55%.

Meanwhile, an American doctor infected with the virus is improving in hospital after returning to the US from Liberia.

Dr Kent Brantly arrived at a military base in Georgia on Saturday before being driven to Emory University Hospital.

"The single most important thing we can do to protect Americans is to stop this disease at the source in Africa" he said.

Special plane
The plane carrying Dr Brantly was outfitted with a special portable tent designed for transporting patients with highly infectious diseases.

The same aircraft is due to bring missionary Nancy Writebol from West Africa.

The hospital facility which will treat both patients is one of four in the US able to handle Ebola patients.

US officials say they are confident the patients can be treated without putting the public in any danger.

The National Institutes of Health in the US has said it will begin testing a possible Ebola vaccine in September.

A true Brit.  Comparing gun control to Ebola outbreaks.  Brilliant.
When I lived in Atlanta, there were a lot of stray bullets flying in the neighborhoods around Emory.

I sincerely hope the quarantine procedures aren't as sloppy and casual as his transport security and handling. After allowing the transport in mid-morning Atlanta freeway traffic with no police escort clearing traffic, then stopping surrounded by PMVs at several traffic lights...all on live TV like the OJ Chase...the kicker was seeing that, at the hospital, this tightly planned procedure apparently called for the clearly weakened patient wearing a clumsy biosuit to stumble down 2ft or so from the bumper of the ambulance to the pavement and walk in, across 50 ft of graveled path through what looked like a construction area while being assisted only by a quite tiny attendant.  With a group of unrestrained onlookers standing 20 feet away. Not to mention the total lack of concern about would-be terrorism targeting the widely announced event.  After all, what could possibly go wrong?



As I said in the other thread; I'm certain they give more thought to security when the lobby ATM is filled.

piss their pants like herd animals

Herd animals wear pants?  They must be Dockers.

I sincerely hope the quarantine procedures aren't as sloppy and casual as his transport security and handling. After allowing the transport in mid-morning Atlanta freeway traffic with no police escort clearing traffic, then stopping surrounded by PMVs at several traffic lights...all on live TV like the OJ Chase...the kicker was seeing that, at the hospital, this tightly planned procedure apparently called for the clearly weakened patient wearing a clumsy biosuit to stumble down 2ft or so from the bumper of the ambulance to the pavement and walk in, across 50 ft of graveled path through what looked like a construction area while being assisted only by a quite tiny attendant.  With a group of unrestrained onlookers standing 20 feet away. Not to mention the total lack of concern about would-be terrorism targeting the widely announced event.  After all, what could possibly go wrong?

Blah blah blah.  The chances of anyone in the USA getting infected are less than being attacked by a great white shark in your bathtub.  Some British guy with bad teeth and a perpetual sneer said so.

Herd animals wear pants?  They must be Dockers.

If one wears them they'll all wear them.

And if FOX tells them to be afeared...

dentally how do you know there'll be no Ebola victims brought to the Uk for treatment? We have the virus being tested on in labs to find a vaccine, what makes you think there's no plans to try and treat patients?
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/ebola-terror-gatwick-passenger-collapses-3977051
A Gatwick airport spokeswoman added: “A passenger collapsed after disembarking a flight from the Gambia. She was treated by airport medical staff at the scene but died later in hospital. The cause of death is yet to be confirmed.”

But papers are hyping it up. I hope it wasn't ebola but something else.


And if FOX tells them to be afeared...

Art thou afeared?  Be not afeared.
The pants are full of noises, sounds, and sweet airs
that give delight and hurt not.

Art thou afeared?  Be not afeared.
The pants are full of noises, sounds, and sweet airs
that give delight and hurt not.

As they say in Newcastle, Ahm feeyat o nowt.

Except spiders.

Obviously I'm scared of spiders.




There have been 5 cases of viral hemorrhagic fever (Marburg and Lassa) brought in to the US from people traveling back from Africa. They were all treated in hospital with no outbreaks to the general population. The African countries affected by Ebola are poor and, the population unfortunately largely superstitious and uneducated. This is why AIDs spread throughout the subcontinent, because the culture didn't support the use of condoms as prevention. In the US we take for granted clean hospitals, trained doctors, nurses and ancillary staff, sterilized equipment and enough protective supplies to ensure no one is infected. Even classrooms like mine are equipped with rubber gloves and medical sanitizer.

 That's not how it is in Africa which is why medical teams like Doctors Without Borders and others are there, bringing their own supplies. They're overwhelmed by this latest outbreak mainly because of substandard healthcare plus a populace that is resistant to seeking medical help and deals with cases at home causing even more preventable infections. To be honest, just going about my daily life, I'd be more concerned with something that's spread in my area by mosquito like West Nile Virus, or airborne like influenza than I would with coming into contact with an infected person's bodily fluids.

The only good, if you want to call it that,  coming out of this sad situation is that the death of the leading Ebola specialist in Sierra Leone has caused WHO to wake the fuck up and declare a crisis which should have been done years ago after the first outbreak. Now maybe more research money will be spent on hemorrhagic fever with an outcome in the form of a treatment regimen or vaccine. Frightening as it may seem to be treating the doctor in Emory, the progress of his disease and the success of his treatment will be part of research in understanding and managing Ebola.

A Gatwick airport spokeswoman added: “A passenger collapsed after disembarking a flight from the Gambia. She was treated by airport medical staff at the scene but died later in hospital. The cause of death is yet to be confirmed.”

But papers are hyping it up. I hope it wasn't ebola but something else.

From a news report:

Quote
Speaking of the horrific moment the passenger collapsed, the shocked staff member added: “The woman was sweating buckets and vomiting. Paramedics arrived to try and help her. The next thing everybody was there… emergency crews, airfield operations, even immigration."

These are classic symptoms of a heart attack - the much more likely cause; she was asymptomatic during the flight - the symptoms came on suddenly per reports.

There have been 5 cases of viral hemorrhagic fever (Marburg and Lassa) brought in to the US from people traveling back from Africa. They were all treated in hospital with no outbreaks to the general population. The African countries affected by Ebola are poor and, the population unfortunately largely superstitious and uneducated. This is why AIDs spread throughout the subcontinent, because the culture didn't support the use of condoms as prevention. In the US we take for granted clean hospitals, trained doctors, nurses and ancillary staff, sterilized equipment and enough protective supplies to ensure no one is infected. Even classrooms like mine are equipped with rubber gloves and medical sanitizer.

 That's not how it is in Africa which is why medical teams like Doctors Without Borders and others are there, bringing their own supplies. They're overwhelmed by this latest outbreak mainly because of substandard healthcare plus a populace that is resistant to seeking medical help and deals with cases at home causing even more preventable infections. To be honest, just going about my daily life, I'd be more concerned with something that's spread in my area by mosquito like West Nile Virus, or airborne like influenza than I would with coming into contact with an infected person's bodily fluids.

The only good, if you want to call it that,  coming out of this sad situation is that the death of the leading Ebola specialist in Sierra Leone has caused WHO to wake the fuck up and declare a crisis which should have been done years ago after the first outbreak. Now maybe more research money will be spent on hemorrhagic fever with an outcome in the form of a treatment regimen or vaccine. Frightening as it may seem to be treating the doctor in Emory, the progress of his disease and the success of his treatment will be part of research in understanding and managing Ebola.

I come from a city with a high percentage of expatriots working abroad, mostly in the oil industry, many of whom are in, have been in, or are returning to Africa as part of their work schedule.  I communicate with them regularly, and they seems pretty unimpressed by the whole Ebola situation. 

General consensus seems to be that from what they can tell the place is a complete shithole, where sanitation and hygiene is largely of only peripheral concern to the locals.

Jings Crivvens writes, "I am in Angola just now and during our safety meeting yesterday we were given info about it.  Basically if you catch it, there is only a 10% chance you will survive.  Its classed as low risk to us Expats due to the way you can catch it, but its still a bit worrying. The main ways to catch it as mentioned above is by coming to contact of bodily fluids of someone who has the disease.  But also from the dead.  A culture here in Africa is the locals kiss and cuddle their loved ones when they have died.  And that's where a high % of them have caught the disease as its still very active after death.  Also if you eat bush meat as a lot of bats and monkeys have the disease as well.  So they consider expats to be at low risk, as generally we automatically wash our hands etc. all the time. And less chance of us eating bush meat, well not knowingly eat it.   I will be glad to leave here on Wednesday, then will watch the news at home to see if it spreads. A few of us here have said if when at home they see it spread to Angola, no chance we flying back."

Redstar says, "I've been to both Lagos and Luanda...they are disease ridden hell holes best avoided... "

Cheesepipes explains, "It's another bullet in the chamber for those who like ebony love. Not only are they Aids ridden but the bat eating bitches now have the power to make you bleed to death out your anus. "

Wise words, Mr Cheesepipes.

Cheesepipes spends a lot of time in Africa, splitting his time between oil-related work and having sex with local prostitutes.

Bluto 10 had this to say. "I dinna eat gristle and krbaba for nothin mi Good for the heart. Eat dust and live like gwinerh and Chris,what's you're arteries training against?"

Bluto 10 is quite often drunk and posts from various bars in the Netherlands, as seems to be the case here.

Point being, if a bunch of drunken, whoremongering roustabouts with zero sexual morals and a penchant for 'going native' aren't overly concerned about the risks then the rest of us probably shouldn't be either.

I guess that was my point anyway.

I really can't remember.



There's been a lot of discussion of this on Free Republic and I'm sure that some of of the posters are laboring under misapprehensions, but someone there said that it's mutated to become airborne. If this is true or even possible, it's a game-changer.

These are classic symptoms of a heart attack - the much more likely cause; she was asymptomatic during the flight - the symptoms came on suddenly per reports.

Yessir, I'd be really surprised if she had ebola.  Didn't sound like it.  But there may be others...

Blah blah blah.  The chances of anyone in the USA getting infected are less than being attacked by a great white shark in your bathtub.  Some British guy with bad teeth and a perpetual sneer said so.


It's less a sneer and more a curled lip, you're okay on the rest though.