Author The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast  (Read 57435 times)

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Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #240 on: February 23, 2014, 07:33:40 PM »
Did you know that American made pots have a date code on them that will tell you the week and year of manufacture?  It's true. 

Years ago I bought 2 dozen NOS 1955 JAN (joint army/navy) surplus solid shaft 250K ohm pots that were manufactured by Mallory to a standard that doesn't exist anymore, and couldn't even be accomplished if it did.  They are absolute heaven in a Telecaster. 

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I will revert to middle school slang: BAD ASS

I was unaware they were date coded.

If abandoned phone booths are porn for me, intriguing pots information is porn squared. Perhaps even cubed.

There's something exhilarating about contemplating a time in U.S. history when so much pride, accountability, and quality control was part of the production method. When you make physical contact with such products, it seems, for me anyway, to exceed nostalgia and borders on the sensation of time travel -  metaphorically getting into the groove with the band/big picture, so to speak.

Occultniks might refer to these sensations as artifacts of psychometry. I think of the experience as a minor altered state, induced by a resonating imagination.

Next on NOVA... Neural Harmonics....

Heh.

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Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #241 on: March 01, 2014, 04:41:13 AM »
Episode 2 was as enjoyable as the first.

I chuckled pretty hard at this, when you were commenting on the Gibson/Lacey Act situation:

"I guess it's all water under the bridge now and they got the wood back and now they're making special guitars out of it."

Regarding robot tuners, as far as I'm concerned, they need to install those inside pianos and give those god-complexed piano tuners a run for their money. They've had it far too easy for a while now.

Another great show in the can, General.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #242 on: March 01, 2014, 01:22:41 PM »
Listened to Ep. #2 awhile ago, I enjoyed it.  The news segment with Red was good as well, she really knows her shit.  I don't know why I was surprised at first to find so many musicians on a paranormal discussion site until I thought about it; but it makes perfect sense.  Creativity and curiosity go hand in hand.


Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #243 on: March 01, 2014, 01:36:51 PM »
Episode 2 was as enjoyable as the first.

I chuckled pretty hard at this, when you were commenting on the Gibson/Lacey Act situation:

"I guess it's all water under the bridge now and they got the wood back and now they're making special guitars out of it."

Regarding robot tuners, as far as I'm concerned, they need to install those inside pianos and give those god-complexed piano tuners a run for their money. They've had it far too easy for a while now.

Another great show in the can, General.
Thank you!  Also, I got your message and it's so on point that I could probably do a whole show about it.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #244 on: March 01, 2014, 01:42:37 PM »
Listened to Ep. #2 awhile ago, I enjoyed it.  The news segment with Red was good as well, she really knows her shit.  I don't know why I was surprised at first to find so many musicians on a paranormal discussion site until I thought about it; but it makes perfect sense.  Creativity and curiosity go hand in hand.
(Redacted) is awesome!  She does know her stuff, and she has different tastes than I do so it really adds more to the show than I'm able to bring.  I wouldn't recognize Zak Wilde if he ran me over with his tour bus but I could talk about obscurities like Slim Harpo, Jimmy Reed, and Lazy Lester all day long.  Few would care. 

I was amazed when I realized how many musicians and artists there were on Bellgab too, but you're absolutely right... Creativity and curiosity go hand in hand.  I gotta get Guildnavigator in on this endeavor for a show... you should hear his band. What a great guitar player.

Thanks for listening.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #245 on: March 01, 2014, 03:58:18 PM »
Thank you!  Also, I got your message and it's so on point that I could probably do a whole show about it.
Cool. Extremely. Here I was, concerned the question was too tangential. I look forward to hearing your response (possibly comprising the larger part of an episode!) whenever the topic coalesces on The Fret Files.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #246 on: March 06, 2014, 10:27:05 AM »
March's episode will feature an interview with Jason Lollar of Lollar pickups.
I should have it done by the 15th.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #247 on: March 15, 2014, 11:21:11 PM »
Check this out General.  Maybe a future show interview...



http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/14/tech/meet-the-robot-guitarist/index.html?hpt=hp_t3

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #248 on: March 16, 2014, 12:03:36 AM »
Check this out General.  Maybe a future show interview...

The robot started to play all crazy at 3:46.
And Zima, is that stuff still around?

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #249 on: March 16, 2014, 12:05:50 AM »
Check this out General.  Maybe a future show interview...



http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/14/tech/meet-the-robot-guitarist/index.html?hpt=hp_t3

That made me want to punch myself in the face.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #250 on: March 18, 2014, 06:40:32 PM »
the latest episode is now posted here.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #251 on: March 18, 2014, 08:04:44 PM »
the latest episode is now posted here.
Thanks MV.
This episode features a great interview with pickup guru Jason Lollar.
Check it out.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #252 on: March 18, 2014, 08:12:51 PM »
the latest episode is now posted here.

yeah, thanks, mang.   8)

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #253 on: March 18, 2014, 10:26:52 PM »
Downloading the new episode now!

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #254 on: March 18, 2014, 10:35:47 PM »
Downloading the new episode now!

I'm going to wait for the bootleg version.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #255 on: March 18, 2014, 10:58:13 PM »
I'm going to wait for the bootleg version.

If you got the money, I know a guy...   8)

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #256 on: March 19, 2014, 08:12:26 PM »
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Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #257 on: March 19, 2014, 08:15:34 PM »
OK.  Now I've ordered new strings for my acoustic bass guitar.  I'm sure I'll embarrass myself when I try to play again.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #258 on: March 19, 2014, 10:17:32 PM »
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Wow! what a pain in the ass for a tech to deal with. Was the initial idea for nibs purely aesthetic?
I can see how the hi/low E strings would catch in the space between the nib and fret if there was a gap between the two.
A nightmare if 1 or 2 nibs were worn or broken off. You would almost have to replace the entire binding or sand them ALL off and replace the frets, on both sides of the neck! $$$
I'm sure there have been more than a few guitar players who try to glue or epoxy a broken nib in a bind (pun intended).
 good show eric!
Redacted was good too!
Tool rocks! Looking forward to the new release.

Your theory about Long hair + Pointy guitars was funny!
However, the 16 year old eddie.dean would have dismissed your theory, >:(
But now, I am starting to realize, you might be on to something!  ;D


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Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #259 on: March 19, 2014, 10:50:43 PM »
Wow! what a pain in the ass for a tech to deal with. Was the initial idea for nibs purely aesthetic?

Yeah, I think so.  Just a fancy way for Gibson to dress up their fret work.  It is a nice look.

Your theory about Long hair + Pointy guitars was funny!
However, the 16 year old eddie.dean would have dismissed your theory, >:(
But now, I am starting to realize, you might be on to something!  ;D
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Heh heh.

Yeah, my tastes lean more toward Slim Harpo...

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I don't know, I just associate heavy metal with meth addiction and toothless people.
Perhaps unfairly.  But it's like the fast food of the music world.  It's just so classless.
Now don't anybody be offended.  Nobody should care what I think anyhow.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #260 on: March 20, 2014, 12:19:11 AM »
Aw, c'mon now General.  Randy Rhoads was class to the hilt.  Heh.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #261 on: March 20, 2014, 12:29:23 AM »
Aw, c'mon now General.  Randy Rhoads was class to the hilt.

Sure.  I guess.  I honestly don't know anything about him, or that era of Ozzy's career. 
I'm a snob, and I admit it, but that whole genre really rubs me the wrong way.
I just always thought it was music for people with shitty lives.  Sorry.
I like early Black Sabbath, if that counts. 
And I think Van Halen is good.
But what do I know? 
I like ABBA for chrissakes.

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Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #262 on: March 20, 2014, 12:41:54 AM »
Yeah, I think so.  Just a fancy way for Gibson to dress up their fret work.  It is a nice look.

Heh heh.

Yeah, my tastes lean more toward Slim Harpo...

[attachimg=1]

I don't know, I just associate heavy metal with meth addiction and toothless people.
Perhaps unfairly.  But it's like the fast food of the music world.  It's just so classless.
Now don't anybody be offended.  Nobody should care what I think anyhow.

I'm not offended. It's a fair observation. Most rock starts certainly appear to be grimey and strungout.
I do have a hard time imaging how a kid can succeed in pissing off his parents, during the rebellious teenage stage, by cranking up a  Les Paul or Buddy Holly tune on the radio.  :) BTW I 'm a fan of BH and LP.

Metallica, Cinderella and Dio worked very well for me in that regard! ;D

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #263 on: March 20, 2014, 12:45:59 AM »
I'm not offended. It's a fair observation. Most rock starts certainly appear to be grimey and strungout.
I do have a hard time imaging how a kid can succeed in pissing off his parents, during the rebellious teenage stage, by cranking up a  Les Paul or Buddy Holly tune on the radio.  :) BTW I 'm a fan of BH and LP.

Metallica, Cinderella and Dio worked very well for me in that regard! ;D

My parents were very very strict and religious.  It didn't take much. 

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #264 on: March 20, 2014, 12:57:12 AM »
And I think Van Halen is good.

Van Halen's most recent album, A Diffferent Kind of Truth, is one of the best albums I have ever listened to/experienced. It's flawless in my opinion.

So much is subjective in music and art. Being a snob is half the fun of it all.

I could lecture at length on the gloriously cerebral aspects of Iron Maiden, but could be argued down by the desperate antics of Twisted Sister. I could counter with the blues driven heart of AC/DC, and be shot down in flames by the mere mention of Quiet Riot's videos. Haha.

Lately, I am on a blues legend Lead Belly tangent and also re-listening to both old and Rubin-era Johnny Cash.

I oscillate.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #265 on: March 20, 2014, 01:00:13 AM »

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #266 on: March 22, 2014, 06:23:34 AM »
Episode 3.  Another winner.

I enjoyed everything - was magnetized by the discussion of winding pickups and hearing the samples.

(An aside: Now, whenever MV threatens "I've already started warming the pickup," I am going to involuntarily read it as "I've already started winding the pickup." Just change that "arm" to "ind". I do realize I have a problem.)

Also greatly enjoyed listening to you answer my question about the reclamation of potentiometers.

Another stunning point in the show that needs mentioning:
The atmosphere created by the differing views between you and Red as she gave a new Tool album update was so thick and so palpable that it briefly changed the conversation into the corporeal - two people walking on a busy sidewalk, approaching each other head on, who meet slightly at the shoulders and deflect out of each other's way before resuming innate vectors.  A friction whisper of fabric was the only thing traded. That was effing talk radio gold. Funny as hell.

Speaking of Hell:

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #267 on: March 22, 2014, 11:00:33 AM »
Episode 3.  Another winner.
I enjoyed everything - was magnetized by the discussion of winding pickups and hearing the samples.

I'm so glad you enjoyed it.  I was really happy about the Jason Lollar interview.  He's like the Gandalf of guitar pickup winding.  I could've interviewed him for 3 hours and not run out of things to ask, but he agreed to a 15 minute interview and I pushed it out to 20.  I got in as much as I could.   I would've loved to have gone into the difference between different grades of Alnico magnets, their metal composition, and the different tones they produce.  I also wanted to ask about the different insulation types on the actual coil wire and see if he agrees with the common belief that the old fashioned enamel coatings are sonically superior to the modern polyurethane coatings.  I also really want to know how he charges his Alnico magnets, because I hear it's a big secret.  I should've asked about it.  Oh well.  There's a hundred more questions I had... maybe he'll do a follow up appearance in a later show.

Also greatly enjoyed listening to you answer my question about the reclamation of potentiometers.

I could've gone a lot deeper into that but I resisted.  I had a lot of material for this episode.  One thing I'm always looking for are 1950s Sprague Bumble Bee .022 mfd 400v capacitors.  Those old home organs are sometimes chock full of them.  Vintage Gibson Les Paul freaks will pay dearly for them, it really is quite insane....

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Yes, that's $99 for two capacitors.  Astonishing.  These were probably about 2 cents for a box of 12 dozen when manufactured.  It's astonishing, really... especially since I believe that there is absolutely no difference in the tonal qualities between these caps and any other caps of the same value, whether they are ceramic, paper-in-oil, mylar, or whatever.  I don't believe the hype about 'vintage caps' in guitar circuits.  I even built a box that proves there is no sonic difference.  It's a passive tone circuit with a selectable 5 position switch that uses 5 different capacitors in the tone circuit, all of the same .02 mfd value.  The 5 caps in the box range from a 1 cent chinese ceramic cap all the way up to a paper-in-oil cap that sells for about $40.  I defy anyone to plug into the box and tell me which cap is the 1 cent chinese cap and which one is the highly sought after paper-in-oil vintage cap.  There's no difference in tone.  Zero.  I've really embarrassed the hell out of some guys with this box.  True believers will actually refuse to try it and come up with all kinds of insane reasons why.

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Another stunning point in the show that needs mentioning:
The atmosphere created by the differing views between you and Red as she gave a new Tool album update was so thick and so palpable that it briefly changed the conversation into the corporeal - two people walking on a busy sidewalk, approaching each other head on, who meet slightly at the shoulders and deflect out of each other's way before resuming innate vectors.  A friction whisper of fabric was the only thing traded. That was effing talk radio gold. Funny as hell.

Red really does a great job.  I never really know where that segment will go, other than that I'll submit a story or two for us to talk about.  She does the rest.  A friend of mine asked, "Who is this 'Red' that does the news?"  I told him that I have no idea.  Which is true.  I don't even know Red's name.  I have a pseudonym, a phone number, and a time to call and that's the only info I really have, other than the fact that she does some guitar tech work and that she's a bellgab user.  I consider her a friend, but I really don't know where or who she is, and he couldn't believe that.  But it's true.  Anyway, I think it adds to the show, the fact that we're sort of getting to know each other's point of views on things as we talk and as the segment unfolds.

Thanks for listening.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #268 on: March 22, 2014, 04:01:40 PM »
Wow! The Amazing 'Cap box'!
I'd be interested in hearing audio clips of the different cap circuits.
 Have you ever tested the audio characteristics  with a spectrum analyer or oscilloscope?
If you can't hear the difference, I guess it doesn't matter much.

It probably  boils down to bragging rights for the person who paid $ for vintage caps.
Or it can be attributed to another phenomenon I've seen happen in the studio,
 If a person believes it is supposed to sound better, it will.


Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #269 on: March 22, 2014, 04:43:32 PM »
Wow! The Amazing 'Cap box'!
I'd be interested in hearing audio clips of the different cap circuits.
 Have you ever tested the audio characteristics  with a spectrum analyer or oscilloscope?
If you can't hear the difference, I guess it doesn't matter much.

It probably  boils down to bragging rights for the person who paid $ for vintage caps.
Or it can be attributed to another phenomenon I've seen happen in the studio,
 If a person believes it is supposed to sound better, it will.

I call it "The Lie Detector."
I haven't tested the audio with a spectrum analyzer, but this guy has, and did a bang up job...
http://www.aqdi.com/tonecap.htm
To sum up what is a lot of information there, "The data and sound clips above show clearly that for tone capacitors of close measured capacitance value there is no difference in tone."