Author The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast  (Read 57431 times)

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Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #120 on: January 22, 2014, 05:15:49 PM »
I used to goof around with a guitar. Have thought about picking it up and giving a go at learning how to play. then I see you guys... and think... maybe a good radio instead.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #121 on: January 22, 2014, 05:20:19 PM »
I used to goof around with a guitar. Have thought about picking it up and giving a go at learning how to play. then I see you guys... and think... maybe a good radio instead.
Dude Elvis knew THREE chords. TOPS!  That's all you need to drive the girls crazy!

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #122 on: January 22, 2014, 05:26:07 PM »
I used to goof around with a guitar. Have thought about picking it up and giving a go at learning how to play. then I see you guys... and think... maybe a good radio instead.
I've always said that everybody should play guitar.
The world would be a lot better place if everybody could at least play "Wipeout."
It's such a great stress reliever, I'd be pretty tense without it.


Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #123 on: January 22, 2014, 05:28:49 PM »
I've always said that everybody should play guitar.
The world would be a lot better place if everybody could at least play "Wipeout."
It's such a great stress reliever, I'd be pretty tense without it.

Say I wanted to spend somewhere under a grand... what guitar would you recommend?

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #124 on: January 22, 2014, 05:31:40 PM »
For a beginner ... go to a music store and get a cheap Yamaha acoustic.  That's what I play every week at church.

You heard/read me right.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #125 on: January 22, 2014, 05:37:41 PM »
I used to goof around with a guitar. Have thought about picking it up and giving a go at learning how to play. then I see you guys... and think... maybe a good radio instead.

I recommend giving it a go Onan! You shouldn't compare your abilities as a beginner to musicians who have been playing for 5 or 10 years. Its more about exploring your creative  side and it gives you a tremendous sense of accomplishment and pride.  It's a beautiful gift you can give to yourself if you can stick with it. Sure, it can be frustrating and tedious, but it's one of the best feelings, ever, when you can jam along to  one of you favorite songs, or create a new piece of music.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #126 on: January 22, 2014, 05:51:34 PM »
For a beginner ... go to a music store and get a cheap Yamaha acoustic.  That's what I play every week at church.

You heard/read me right.

Good suggestion. Takamine  or epiphone comes to mind also.
a cheap guitar under 500 might be a better option to consider initially. If you enjoy learning and want to stick with it, you can buy a better guitar later. One thing to consider is the action. ( The height of the strings from the fret board)
With a beginner sometimes the action is a frustrating deal-braker. It requires more hand and wrist strength to fret chords, which beginners don't have and must build up.

onan:
You can find a steel string acoustic guitar for under 500 bucks.  Or maybe a Classical style acoustic guitar(my very first guitar) in the same price range. Classical style, has a slightly wider neck, nylon strings, and isn't as difficult to "fret" the strings,  meaning, to  press down the strings.  The string tention isn't as high as steel string guitars, but the neck is wider. It's a trade off. Maybe the other guys can give opinions on the best guitar type for a beginner.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #127 on: January 22, 2014, 05:53:39 PM »
Say I wanted to spend somewhere under a grand... what guitar would you recommend?
Electric or acoustic?

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #128 on: January 22, 2014, 06:09:31 PM »

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #129 on: January 22, 2014, 06:14:40 PM »
Good suggestion. Takamine  or epiphone comes to mind also.
a cheap guitar under 500 might be a better option to consider initially. If you enjoy learning and want to stick with it, you can buy a better guitar later. One thing to consider is the action. ( The height of the strings from the fret board)
With a beginner sometimes the action is a frustrating deal-braker. It requires more hand and wrist strength to fret chords, which beginners don't have and must build up.

onan:
You can find a steel string acoustic guitar for under 500 bucks.  Or maybe a Classical style acoustic guitar(my very first guitar) in the same price range. Classical style, has a slightly wider neck, nylon strings, and isn't as difficult to "fret" the strings,  meaning, to  press down the strings.  The string tention isn't as high as steel string guitars, but the neck is wider. It's a trade off. Maybe the other guys can give opinions on the best guitar type for a beginner.

I am not a complete novice, I was playing lots of 70's music... just rhythm though.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #130 on: January 22, 2014, 06:32:36 PM »
acoustic
I think it's important for you to get a guitar that you are excited about.  Don't buy something on the recommendation of somebody else if you are not excited about the guitar.  You won't play it if it doesn't float your boat. 

My recommendation would be to get the nicest guitar you can afford.  I would recommend either a Martin or a Gibson or maybe a Guild for an acoustic guitar.  You can get a brand new Martin OM-1GT for just under a grand.

Something decent that is used is always a good bargain though, you can check craigslist for a decent used guitar.  If you go the used route, I would recommend getting an American made guitar with a solid top, like a Martin, Guild, or Gibson.  Just have a buddy who knows guitars or a pro repair dude verify that it is not a basket case before you buy it.  Many craigslist guitars are being sold there because they have problems.  If you buy a used guitar from a retail store, buy from one that does in house repairs and ask the repair dude a bunch of annoying questions about it.  Ask for a free set-up with the purchase.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #131 on: January 22, 2014, 06:35:17 PM »
I am not a complete novice, I was playing lots of 70's music... just rhythm though.
Dude, did I play bass with you in Albuquerque as Dave and the Nuthuggers? 

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #132 on: January 22, 2014, 06:42:57 PM »
I think it's important for you to get a guitar that you are excited about.  Don't buy something on the recommendation of somebody else if you are not excited about the guitar.  You won't play it if it doesn't float your boat. 
The General- this is so true. I had an acoustic that was pretty but eh with the desire to play her. Once, while attempting, I decided that this was not MY guitar. Never really played it again. Recently, one of my sons walked up with a nice case holding a guitar I really like and said here dad, happy birthday! I'm starting it up again now. (The Mrs and I used to play and write together, and with a group.)

Nice guitar. Nice kid.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #133 on: January 22, 2014, 07:43:07 PM »
I think it's important for you to get a guitar that you are excited about.  Don't buy something on the recommendation of somebody else if you are not excited about the guitar.  You won't play it if it doesn't float your boat. 

My recommendation would be to get the nicest guitar you can afford.  I would recommend either a Martin or a Gibson or maybe a Guild for an acoustic guitar.  You can get a brand new Martin OM-1GT for just under a grand.

Something decent that is used is always a good bargain though, you can check craigslist for a decent used guitar.  If you go the used route, I would recommend getting an American made guitar with a solid top, like a Martin, Guild, or Gibson.  Just have a buddy who knows guitars or a pro repair dude verify that it is not a basket case before you buy it.  Many craigslist guitars are being sold there because they have problems.  If you buy a used guitar from a retail store, buy from one that does in house repairs and ask the repair dude a bunch of annoying questions about it.  Ask for a free set-up with the purchase.

Superb advice!
This is why your podcast is so great, Eric! sound advice indeed! (pun intended)

you have a podcast about guitars, I (we) have a podcast about cock pics and anal leakage.
I suggest Onan follow the advice of the expert here!  ;D lol!

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #134 on: January 22, 2014, 07:50:04 PM »
ha ha.  Thank yeeew. (in the voice of George Noory)

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #135 on: January 22, 2014, 11:06:56 PM »
Dude, did I play bass with you in Albuquerque as Dave and the Nuthuggers?
Rhythm guitar for Dave and the Pizza Rollers

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #136 on: January 23, 2014, 05:36:48 PM »
Whatever you do, I'd suggest you try before you buy if at all possible.  Don't remember if it was in this thread or the podcast if was mentioned that what you think a guitar will feel like may not always be how it actually is.  I've bought sight unseen 3 times and 1 of those was not great.  To any lurkers out there - if you don't think you're any good or it sounds too complicated, just try it.  I bought my first POS electric about 16 yrs. ago and am still not much better than I was then.  I really don't even care, I just like to throw on some cds and play along to some Tom Petty or something simple.  I don't really like to play if I'm not having fun with it.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #137 on: January 23, 2014, 05:42:31 PM »
Whatever you do, I'd suggest you try before you buy if at all possible.  Don't remember if it was in this thread or the podcast if was mentioned that what you think a guitar will feel like may not always be how it actually is. 
That's a great point.  It really is a good idea to play any guitar you buy first.  Guitar Center and those online superstores usually have a pretty easy return policy if you're buying new... but if you're buying on eBay or buying a used one sight unseen... yeah, buyer beware.  EBay is where effed up guitars go to get passed on to the unsuspecting. 

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #138 on: January 24, 2014, 01:14:34 PM »
My crappy playing on a crappy guitar with crappy sound.




That's not crappy playing.

I haven't met a truly good player who wasn't humble though. You could cut some fools.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #139 on: January 24, 2014, 04:03:37 PM »
That's a great point.  It really is a good idea to play any guitar you buy first.  Guitar Center and those online superstores usually have a pretty easy return policy if you're buying new... but if you're buying on eBay or buying a used one sight unseen... yeah, buyer beware.  EBay is where effed up guitars go to get passed on to the unsuspecting. 
I can't really complain about the guitar I got used from guitar center.  It wasn't site unsceen pretty sure there was a pic and I knew there would be a couple of dings places.   The thing that pissed me off was how that neck pickup screw was short and just barely screwed in enough to hold the pickup up so that cosmetically it was fine... but when I tried to drop the pickup level a little bit booom!  The spring sent it right to the bottom. 

but again I use the neck pickup rarely... still I wanna fix it.

oh and i liked yer whammy style ak.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #140 on: January 24, 2014, 05:50:24 PM »
I can't really complain about the guitar I got used from guitar center.  It wasn't site unsceen pretty sure there was a pic and I knew there would be a couple of dings places.   The thing that pissed me off was how that neck pickup screw was short and just barely screwed in enough to hold the pickup up so that cosmetically it was fine... but when I tried to drop the pickup level a little bit booom!  The spring sent it right to the bottom. 

but again I use the neck pickup rarely... still I wanna fix it.

oh and i liked yer whammy style ak.

The question seems to be if whammy is better than non-whammy. That's like getting down to what the definition of an artist is.

Van Gogh, Rembrandt , well, they had their fine points. Live music, I look mostly for how well the musician's ears work to play the venue and music. That is a very complex equation. I only realized early on that a B3 was always in tune because 1 motor drove the tone bars. The only time I sat on a B3 bench during my lunch break in the basement I was painting after hooking it up to the 147RV as sold, and I almost couldn't believe the depth of the foot pedals and percussion tab to express something. The rest of my life I've been kicking myself in the rear end for not buying that B3 for $1.5K as offered by customer because I didn't have means of transportating it at the time. It only had a few 100 hours on it since new, and the package included an extra cabinet that included an amp and speakers to use it without revolving sound controlled in speed by lever. Yes, today it is done digitally based on a clock of very stable frequency, and perhaps can be as good, but a 100% analog electric or acoustic musical instrument still defines the quality of the artist live on stage.

Perhaps the extremes of analog musical instruments are the piano and trombone. Add an upright bass, violin, and drum kit to fill in the the beat and middle range expressions, and any other acoustic instrument added to something not written on paper is known as Jazz in America. I can only add with a general direction of words written and sung but totally dependent on the audience.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #141 on: January 25, 2014, 06:49:03 AM »
I remember seeing an actual speaker revolving inside of an opened speaker cabinet at one of the local guitar shops.  I was just a kid and it really blew my mind. 

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #142 on: January 25, 2014, 07:41:31 AM »
I remember seeing an actual speaker revolving inside of an opened speaker cabinet at one of the local guitar shops.  I was just a kid and it really blew my mind.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leslie_speaker

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #143 on: January 25, 2014, 02:40:58 PM »

That's not crappy playing.

I haven't met a truly good player who wasn't humble though. You could cut some fools.

Coming from you that means a lot. Thanks, good sir.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #144 on: January 26, 2014, 02:56:00 AM »
Hey General, I have a question.  Is there a common issue which would cause one chord to be in tune while a different chord is out of tune?  I want to tune the guitar then have all chords be in tune whether they're open, barred, partial, played low vs. high on the neck, etc.  It's drivin' me crazy.   :-\

(Btw this is a pretty nice classical guitar I'm referring too.)

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #145 on: January 26, 2014, 03:36:40 AM »
string saddles? neck ? im guessing a number of things but... wanna hear the docs answer on that one.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #146 on: January 26, 2014, 11:36:58 AM »
Zeebo: How old are your strings? Seen this happen on nylon stringed guitars frequently. The strings stretch out unevenly causing what seems like intonation problems.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #147 on: January 26, 2014, 02:25:38 PM »
Hey General, I have a question.  Is there a common issue which would cause one chord to be in tune while a different chord is out of tune?  I want to tune the guitar then have all chords be in tune whether they're open, barred, partial, played low vs. high on the neck, etc.  It's drivin' me crazy.   :-\

(Btw this is a pretty nice classical guitar I'm referring too.)
Guild nailed it, it's old strings, likely.  New nylon strings will take a few days to settle, though, so it will be worse before it gets better.  Once the strings stabilize, if it's not better, you may need to have your guitar fitted for a compensated saddle: (note the notch)
[attachimg=1]
Other things that can cause this are an improperly cut nut, action set too high, bad fret wear, I could go on... just change the strings first and see what happens.

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #148 on: January 26, 2014, 05:55:22 PM »
Guild nailed it, it's old strings, likely.  New nylon strings will take a few days to settle, though, so it will be worse before it gets better.  Once the strings stabilize, if it's not better, you may need to have your guitar fitted for a compensated saddle: (note the notch)
[attachimg=1]
Other things that can cause this are an improperly cut nut, action set too high, bad fret wear, I could go on... just change the strings first and see what happens.

Interesting. Isn't the notch in this case a string raiser w/slightly shorter length?

As an aside, have you ever worked w/a FFT analyzer w/zoom frequency resolution to 3 digits < 1?

Re: The Fret Files: the guitar workshop podcast
« Reply #149 on: January 26, 2014, 07:05:51 PM »
Got another question for the next cast: When gluing in frets, do you reccommend installing the fret and then applying glue next to the fret so that it wicks under? Or do you glue first? I'm way more practiced at doing it the first way. I'd like your opinion on this.

Also, do you ever scrape glue off of the fretboard with a razor?