Author Topic: Steve Warner's Dark City  (Read 524584 times)

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Dark Weekend
« Reply #330 on: December 15, 2013, 01:23:41 AM »
Great job Bateman!  My first time to listen and I loved the interview with Peter Davenport.  I always enjoy hearing him and always remember his story about buying and moving into an old abandoned missile silo.  You really have the heavy hitters of guests.  Your guests are from Art Bell's "A" list of guests.  Your show was like listening to Art back in the 90s which is great.  Thanks for the show and I will be listening regularly.

bateman

get whitley streiber on

ask him how his colon is doing

Dark Weekend
« Reply #331 on: December 15, 2013, 05:25:34 AM »
bateman

get whitley streiber on

ask him how his colon is doing

You say "colon" / I say PORTAL TO ANOTHER DIMENSION

Dark Weekend
« Reply #332 on: December 15, 2013, 05:54:06 AM »
bateman

get whitley streiber on

ask him how his colon is doing

 ;D ;D ;D... I second that motion!


Dark Weekend
« Reply #333 on: December 15, 2013, 08:55:54 AM »
Good chat with Davenport, but obviously he's had lots of practice. Did he mention a link to the interviews with the Staten island ferry UFO witnesses, if he did I missed it.


Dark Weekend
« Reply #334 on: December 15, 2013, 09:07:58 AM »
BateMeister,

Just listened to your interview with Richard See Toadgland. Something must be wrong. It was interesting, understandable, enjoyable.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #335 on: December 15, 2013, 09:19:05 AM »
You say "colon" / I say PORTAL TO ANOTHER DIMENSION

A portal that Dark Matter passes through :o

Dark Weekend
« Reply #336 on: December 15, 2013, 12:09:32 PM »
BateMeister,

Just listened to your interview with Richard See Toadgland. Something must be wrong. It was interesting, understandable, enjoyable.
I felt the same listening to this latest show with Davenport.  Whenever he's on shit to shit he just doesn't seem interesting.  I'm pretty sure it had more to do with who was interviewing him.  There were a lot of UFO stories mentioned that I had never heard of and I liked hearing him do his short bio which I also had never heard before.  Funny how you've turned normally skip-worthy guests from coast into really good features.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #337 on: December 15, 2013, 12:52:43 PM »
OK, bateman. Time to have unscreened open lines.  I want to hear the GNoory prank call to you. Who would YOU recommend as a cat astrologer? If sNoory doesn't do it, he has not a ball.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #338 on: December 15, 2013, 12:54:12 PM »

I do kind of wonder why you would transport anti-gravity technology... by plane.

Long before I heard of Bellgab my friend Paul sent me an email about this guy with his contact information. So we corresponded and even talked on the phone & he got furious when I showed him up as being a complete fool who knew little about military matters and the technical history of the ships and aircraft he was talking about.

First of all, he claims to have been working on the Post Library in a secret repository of documents in that building. I was on the Presidio post hundreds of times and spent many hours reading IN that library. It was ( and is, the building is empty but is still there ) a large glass walled building that had the shelving of any civilian library but its rear opens up to a road where there was and is parking spaces. There is and never was NO secret room, building or attachment to that building.

He made claims that a fleet of Japanese super submarines were carrying atomic bombs to America which made us quit the war, yet the Japanese only built 3 or 4 of them. All were captured by us at the end of the war and either scrapped or sunk, one being recently found off of Hawaii where it was sunk by OUR Navy after testing and studies were done of it.

As to the Heinkel 111 Greif there is NO way it was going to carry any secret stuff to South America.

From Janes Encylopedia of Aviation ( which is kept next to Imac at all times to allow me to look aircraft up ) :

" It was a heavy bomber ... 4 Daimler Benz engines were grouped together in pairs. Many prototypes were built , most of which displyed obvious shortcomings including dangerous diving characteristics,landing gear & structural weaknesses, ... problems associated with the engines including crankshaft torsional vibration, lubrication & propeller troubles; 2 prototypes broke up in the air & at least one caught fire.

   ... (paraphrasing part of this ) brief use of  the aircraft on the Eastern Front, several caught fire & the plane earned the nickname ' Flying Coffin '.

   At the end of the war approached fewer & fewer Greifs remained operational : shortages of fuel & trouble with the engines grounding large numbers. "

   The problem with people like Dougie is that when you confront them with FACTS & the FACT that they're full of shit, they get indignant and then tell YOU ( or try to ) that THEY have secret information that YOU are not aware of.

   Dougie has also appeared at local Bay Area UFO Conferences and Conspiracy Cons & I told the organizer of that event that he's a total sham and not to believe his stuff.

   There are so many of these types of people out there who say they know dark secrets and purvey them into a money making career while their basic premises are built on a foundation of wet sawdust.

   Or to put it another way, they're full of shit.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #339 on: December 15, 2013, 01:07:52 PM »
Rubbish you say?   ... if the Nazi breakaway had secret anti gravity tech they most certainty would have a secret 4 engine long range airplane or maybe a V1 powered plane.

A V1 powered plane ?

The Glouster Meteor and the Tempest V were used to destroy thousands of V1's in flight. It would have been no problem to shoot down such a plane as well, which was in all probability never constructed as a long range aircraft.

However, this from wikipedia :

Late in the war, several air-launched piloted V-1s, known as Reichenbergs, were built, but never used in combat. Hanna Reitsch made some flights in the modified V-1 Fieseler Reichenberg when she was asked to find out why test pilots were unable to land it and had died as a result. She discovered, after simulated landing attempts at high altitude where there was air space to recover, that the craft had an extremely high stall speed and the previous pilots with little high speed experience had attempted their approaches much too slowly. Her recommendation of much higher landing speeds was then introduced in training new Reichenberg volunteer pilots. The Reichenbergs were air-launched rather than fired from a catapult ramp as erroneously portrayed in Operation Crossbow.

There were plans, not put into practice, to use the Arado Ar 234 jet bomber to launch V-1s either by towing them aloft or by launching them from a "piggy back" position (in the manner of the Mistel, but in reverse) atop the aircraft. In the latter configuration, a pilot-controlled, hydraulically operated dorsal trapeze mechanism would elevate the missile on the trapeze's launch cradle some eight feet clear of the 234's upper fuselage. This was necessary to avoid damaging the mother craft's fuselage and tail surfaces when the pulse jet ignited, as well as to ensure a 'clean' airflow for the Argus motor's intake. A somewhat less ambitious project undertaken was the adaptation of the missile as a 'flying fuel tank' (Deichselschlepp) for the Messerschmitt Me 262 jet fighter, which was initially test-towed behind an He 177A Greif bomber. The pulse-jet, internal systems and warhead of the missile were removed, leaving only the wings and basic fuselage, now containing a single large fuel tank. A small cylindrical module, similar in shape to a finless dart, was placed atop the vertical stabilizer at the rear of the tank, acting as a centre of gravity balance and attachment point for a variety of equipment sets. A rigid tow-bar with a pitch pivot at the forward end connected the flying tank to the Me 262. The operational procedure for this unusual configuration saw the tank resting on a wheeled trolley for take-off. The trolley was dropped once the combination was airborne, and explosive bolts separated the towbar from the fighter upon exhaustion of the tank's fuel supply. A number of test flights were conducted in 1944 with this set-up, but inflight "porpoising" of the tank, with the instability transferred to the fighter, meant the system was too unreliable to be used. An identical utilisation of the V-1 flying tank for the Ar 234 bomber was also investigated, with the same conclusions reached. Some of the "flying fuel tanks" used in trials utilised a cumbersome fixed and spatted undercarriage arrangement, which (along with being pointless) merely increased the drag and stability problems already inherent in the design.

One variant of the basic Fi 103 design did see operational use. The progressive loss of French launch sites as 1944 proceeded and the area of territory under German control shrank meant that soon the V-1 would lack the range to hit targets in England. Air-launching was one alternative utilised, but the most obvious solution was to extend the missile's range. Thus the F-1 version developed. The weapon's fuel tank was increased in size, with a corresponding reduction in the capacity of the warhead. Additionally, the nose-cones of the F-1 models were made of wood, affording a considerable weight saving. With these modifications, the V-1 could be fired at London and nearby urban centres from prospective ground sites in the Netherlands. Frantic efforts were made to construct a sufficient number of F-1s in order to allow a large-scale bombardment campaign to coincide with the Ardennes Offensive, but numerous factors (bombing of the factories producing the missiles, shortages of steel and rail transport, the chaotic tactical situation Germany was facing at this point in the war etc.) delayed the delivery of these long-range V-1s until February/March 1945. Before the V-1 campaign ended for good at the end of the latter month, several hundred F-1s were launched at Britain from Dutch sites.

Almost 30,000 V-1s were made; by March 1944, they were produced in 350 hours (including 120 for the autopilot), at a cost of just 4% of a V-2, which delivered a comparable payload. Approximately 10,000 were fired at England; 2,419 reached London, killing about 6,184 people and injuring 17,981. The greatest density of hits were received by Croydon, on the south-east fringe of London. Antwerp, Belgium was hit by 2,448 V-1s from October 1944 to March 1945.

Not even the Heinkels used to launch V1s would have had the operational range to get to South America. The RAF and the AAF were shooting down almost anything German that flew over the skies of Germany, even to the point where the Meteor pilots claimed they shot down 20 German jets.


Dark Weekend
« Reply #340 on: December 15, 2013, 01:09:07 PM »
Long before I heard of Bellgab my friend Paul sent me an email about this guy with his contact information. So we corresponded and even talked on the phone & he got furious when I showed him up as being a complete fool who knew little about military matters and the technical history of the ships and aircraft he was talking about.

First of all, he claims to have been working on the Post Library in a secret repository of documents in that building. I was on the Presidio post hundreds of times and spent many hours reading IN that library. It was ( and is, the building is empty but is still there ) a large glass walled building that had the shelving of any civilian library but its rear opens up to a road where there was and is parking spaces. There is and never was NO secret room, building or attachment to that building.

He made claims that a fleet of Japanese super submarines were carrying atomic bombs to America which made us quit the war, yet the Japanese only built 3 or 4 of them. All were captured by us at the end of the war and either scrapped or sunk, one being recently found off of Hawaii where it was sunk by OUR Navy after testing and studies were done of it.

As to the Heinkel 111 Greif there is NO way it was going to carry any secret stuff to South America.

From Janes Encylopedia of Aviation ( which is kept next to Imac at all times to allow me to look aircraft up ) :

" It was a heavy bomber ... 4 Daimler Benz engines were grouped together in pairs. Many prototypes were built , most of which displyed obvious shortcomings including dangerous diving characteristics,landing gear & structural weaknesses, ... problems associated with the engines including crankshaft torsional vibration, lubrication & propeller troubles; 2 prototypes broke up in the air & at least one caught fire.

   ... (paraphrasing part of this ) brief use of  the aircraft on the Eastern Front, several caught fire & the plane earned the nickname ' Flying Coffin '.

   At the end of the war approached fewer & fewer Greifs remained operational : shortages of fuel & trouble with the engines grounding large numbers. "

   The problem with people like Dougie is that when you confront them with FACTS & the FACT that they're full of shit, they get indignant and then tell YOU ( or try to ) that THEY have secret information that YOU are not aware of.

   Dougie has also appeared at local Bay Area UFO Conferences and Conspiracy Cons & I told the organizer of that event that he's a total sham and not to believe his stuff.

   There are so many of these types of people out there who say they know dark secrets and purvey them into a money making career while their basic premises are built on a foundation of wet sawdust.

   Or to put it another way, they're full of shit.

Fuck, what do you know. I agree with Falkie! Apart from he's said He111 and it's He 177.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #341 on: December 15, 2013, 01:21:56 PM »
Rubbish you say?   ... if the Nazi breakaway had secret anti gravity tech they most certainty would have a secret 4 engine long range airplane or maybe a V1 powered plane.

I'll indulge you. Germany was working on many projects in WW2. It was working on stuff that never got off the drawing board too. Some of it actually reached production in small numbers towards the end of the war..the Me163 and Me 262 being two such things. As was the Horton glider. Hannah Reitsch was a test pilot with of all things the V1, and she really believed that pilots should be prepared to commit suicide and formed a squadron to that aim, although it's believed Hitler overruled it.

After the war, mainly British test pilots and engineers went through the factories and retrieved as much as they could, indeed it was a British Major who got the VW plant up and running (shame they never caught on)...

If there was any secret four engined bomber in production it wasn't found by the invading allies. Hitler it seems wasn't impressed with the idea of long range bombers, and by the time the RAF and USAF had razed Berlin, Dresden, Frankfurt, Dusseldorf and Koln etc to the ground it was too late to design one.

The V1 was a flying bomb (strictly a drone), powered by a pulse jet, a pulse jet for the size needed and distance expected to cover to South American would be huge (You haven't thought this through have you?)... so totally impractical.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #342 on: December 15, 2013, 05:27:59 PM »
I really enjoyed this interview, Bateman. Peter Davenport is one of my favorite guests because he knows what he's talking about and there's no woo if you know what I mean. He must be overjoyed at Podesta's appointment.

Hard to believe, but I've lived in NYC or thereabouts all my life and this is the first I've heard of the Staten Island Ferry sighting. Wow, got a lot of research to do.

Great show!

Dark Weekend
« Reply #343 on: December 15, 2013, 05:52:07 PM »
I'll indulge you. Germany was working on many projects in WW2.
If there was any secret four engined bomber in production it wasn't found by the invading allies. Hitler it seems wasn't impressed with the idea of long range bombers, and by the time the RAF and USAF had razed Berlin, Dresden, Frankfurt, Dusseldorf and Koln etc to the ground it was too late to design one.

The V1 was a flying bomb (strictly a drone), powered by a pulse jet, a pulse jet for the size needed and distance expected to cover to South American would be huge (You haven't thought this through have you?)... so totally impractical.

So which allied power got the Nazi anti gravity technology?
I'd speculate that it was the Americans and in 1947 they crashed one northwest of Roswell NM.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #344 on: December 15, 2013, 05:53:12 PM »
Bateman, you have competition.

UFO Phil has a podcast now.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #345 on: December 15, 2013, 06:10:23 PM »
Well now Mr. Bateman, if Art is truly using the Dark Matter network to discover the next "Art Bell"....
....When he offers you a broadcast contract read the fine print... (non compete thingie)

Dark Weekend
« Reply #346 on: December 16, 2013, 01:52:49 AM »
So which allied power got the Nazi anti gravity technology?
I'd speculate that it was the Americans and in 1947 they crashed one northwest of Roswell NM.

I can't tell you. I'd have to kill you if I did.*


*pssst. There isn't any anti gravity tech, apart from within fertile imaginations.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #347 on: December 16, 2013, 05:14:05 AM »
Well now Mr. Bateman, if Art is truly using the Dark Matter network to discover the next "Art Bell"....
....When he offers you a broadcast contract read the fine print... (non compete thingie)

Free Bate Man!!

First.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #348 on: December 16, 2013, 07:27:24 AM »
Listened to the two most recent shows last night

Great interviews.  They both got comfortable enough to show their full hand on other issues.  A lot of these nuts have multiple common delusions, suspicions, and beliefs.   No wonder George asks Lunar astronauts if they saw Bigfoot up there.   

Dark Weekend
« Reply #349 on: December 16, 2013, 08:06:44 AM »
Free Bate Man!!

First.

Hahahah.  (No more coffee for me!!)   ;D

Dark Weekend
« Reply #350 on: December 16, 2013, 08:43:55 AM »
I can't tell you. I'd have to kill you if I did.*


*pssst. There isn't any anti gravity tech, apart from within fertile imaginations.

Element 115 duh :o

Dark Weekend
« Reply #351 on: December 16, 2013, 08:49:51 AM »
Maybe they'll ask Bateman to replace JBW.

Bateman on Saturdays, Knapp on Sundays, to hell with the rest of the week.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #352 on: December 16, 2013, 08:53:27 AM »
Element 115 duh :o

And? Please feel free to give references to proven and documented anti-gravity equipment. And no, you can't cite the linear motor invented by Eric Laithwaite.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #353 on: December 16, 2013, 09:01:31 AM »
*pssst. There isn't any anti gravity tech, apart from within fertile imaginations.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #354 on: December 16, 2013, 09:07:48 AM »
And? Please feel free to give references to proven and documented anti-gravity equipment. And no, you can't cite the linear motor invented by Eric Laithwaite.

Bob lazar

He also invented the sarcasm detector .  Or, reverse engineered it.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #355 on: December 16, 2013, 09:11:33 AM »



Apart from the balloons. The balloons go without saying.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #356 on: December 16, 2013, 11:55:03 AM »
Having trouble keeping up with the posts, emails & messages, but THANK YOU all.

Good chat with Davenport, but obviously he's had lots of practice. Did he mention a link to the interviews with the Staten island ferry UFO witnesses, if he did I missed it.
I'll see if I can get the report from him, I can't find it on his website. Here's the piece from the Times: http://www.nytimes.com/1999/10/24/nyregion/fyi-081191.html

OK, bateman. Time to have unscreened open lines.  I want to hear the GNoory prank call to you. Who would YOU recommend as a cat astrologer? If sNoory doesn't do it, he has not a ball.
Obviously: http://www.drstandley.com/cat_sunsigns.shtml

Dark Weekend
« Reply #357 on: December 16, 2013, 12:10:29 PM »
Thank you for the podcasts Bateman ... I have only listened to the last two (RCH and Davenport) and found them to be excellent!  Can't wait to catch up with the other ones (that is why I so enjoy that they are podcasts that I can pull up at my convenience!!!!!)

I agree with all other comments regarding your level of professionalism!  Keep up the excellent work and thanks again ...

 8)  In Sincerity,  Ms. C




Dark Weekend
« Reply #358 on: December 16, 2013, 12:16:08 PM »
Can't wait to hear the Davenport interview. Man these are great shows.

Dark Weekend
« Reply #359 on: December 16, 2013, 12:17:55 PM »
Having trouble keeping up with the posts, emails & messages, but THANK YOU all.
Yeh but, seriously Bate dude, good going.  Listened to the Davenport and you set a fine table.  Not too greasy, not too sweet.  Filling.  It made me feel bad though, that I didn't post my recent "sighting" on his thingy but hey, I did it live here mo betta.

Carry on.