Author Topic: Autism study  (Read 1011 times)

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Autism study
« on: September 10, 2013, 05:04:46 PM »
I just read an update from one of my resources regarding a possible link to Autism Spectrum Disorder and induced labor and birth.

Quote
Oxytocin plays an important role in social-affiliative behaviors. It has been proposed that exposure to high levels of exogenous oxytocin at birth, via pitocin induction of delivery, might increase susceptibility to autism by causing a down regulation of oxytocin receptors in the developing brain.

I can't give a direct link; the studies are discussed in JAMA pediatrics and the NEJM journal watch.

Autism study
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2013, 07:02:24 PM »
That's pretty interesting. Reputable journals, too. Do you know if this was a large scale study or more modest? That's pretty scary since many women, myself included, are encouraged to have labor induced when it halts or  doesn't progress out of concern for the stress on mother and baby. Maybe studies like this will once and for all shut up people like Jenny McCarthy.

Autism study
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2013, 07:06:52 PM »
That's pretty interesting. Reputable journals, too. Do you know if this was a large scale study or more modest? That's pretty scary since many women, myself included, are encouraged to have labor induced when it halts or  doesn't progress out of concern for the stress on mother and baby. Maybe studies like this will once and for all shut up people like Jenny McCarthy.

One study from NC involved 687,000 subjects. The one mentioned in JAMA was much more modest.


Autism study
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2013, 07:31:02 PM »
The NC study has the impressive numbers to make OBGYNs rethink how they handle prolonged labor. This could be a real gamechanger for birth and delivery. And maybe it'll begin to convince antivaxers that the original 'study' was deeply suspect to begin with. On the other hand, that group is so deeply entrenched that I doubt if anything will change their minds unfortunately.


Autism study
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2013, 07:47:53 PM »
The NC study has the impressive numbers to make OBGYNs rethink how they handle prolonged labor. This could be a real gamechanger for birth and delivery. And maybe it'll begin to convince antivaxers that the original 'study' was deeply suspect to begin with. On the other hand, that group is so deeply entrenched that I doubt if anything will change their minds unfortunately.

The studies are a long way from actual treatment changes. But this information is quite impressive.

As to the anti-vaccine crowd... *sigh*

Autism study
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2013, 08:45:28 PM »
Meh, I'm still leery of the effect of possible current over-diagnosis, combined with possible prior undiagnosed cases, or whether changes in clinical definition over the years, if any, might have led to a gross statistical anomaly. There is categorically no way in hell "1 in 150" babies born are autistic. It's not possible. Exogenous oxytocin is an interesting suspect as a culprit, but let's see how it all turns out. One thing it's not is vaccinations.

Autism study
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2013, 08:59:49 PM »
Meh, I'm still leery of the effect of possible current over-diagnosis, combined with possible prior undiagnosed cases, or whether changes in clinical definition over the years, if any, might have led to a gross statistical anomaly. There is categorically no way in hell "1 in 150" babies born are autistic. It's not possible. Exogenous oxytocin is an interesting suspect as a culprit, but let's see how it all turns out.

Some sources say 1 in 88 infants. At some point a diagnosis is probably more harmful than beneficial. Although I would be hard pressed to draw that line.

I get to see a lot of poorly diagnosed clients and patients. I see many labeled with bipolar that in my opinion may be no more manic, hypomanic, or unipolar than me without sleep for a day. I see schizoaffective  clients that don't seem all that different in presentation than the average guy walking down the street. But what I don't see a lot of is missed diagnoses of autism. That may well be due to a very broad net. On the other hand, it may well represent a much larger cognitive problem than previously considered. If I would say anything it would be I have met many people in my life that seem to have difficulty understanding the complexities of social interaction. Could that be just a quirk? sure. But it may also be someone unable to recognize social cues due to an inability to process information properly.

Autism study
« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2013, 05:11:58 AM »
Or, it could be that those of us "on the spectrum" process information correctly, and spend out time processing important information, while you NTs waste a lot of time and energy on all your social interactions.

Autism study
« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2013, 05:43:30 AM »
Or, it could be that those of us "on the spectrum" process information correctly, and spend out time processing important information, while you NTs waste a lot of time and energy on all your social interactions.

That actually is a very good point. The problem that poses however is those with autism will have a very difficult time organizing as a group.

Much in the same way atheists are better at problem solving by not wasting time with prayer. Yet the vast majority of people are believers and have more logistical abilities if for no other reason than their numbers.

Autism study
« Reply #9 on: September 11, 2013, 06:30:32 AM »
I just read an update from one of my resources regarding a possible link to Autism Spectrum Disorder and induced labor and birth.

Would that include induced labor for the convenience of the parents ? I'm seeing that a lot more among my family and friends. My cousin's daughter-in-law deliberately had her recent baby on Labor Day, as that was the only time she, as a nurse, and her husband, as a firefighter, both could get three days in a row off. My youngest sister 'scheduled' the births of all three of her kids. They seem OK, though.

Autism study
« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2013, 04:13:11 PM »
Would that include induced labor for the convenience of the parents ? I'm seeing that a lot more among my family and friends. My cousin's daughter-in-law deliberately had her recent baby on Labor Day, as that was the only time she, as a nurse, and her husband, as a firefighter, both could get three days in a row off. My youngest sister 'scheduled' the births of all three of her kids. They seem OK, though.

It would. And to add, my next door neighbor is a obgyn nurse. She tells me that the hospital she works at caters to upper middle class to wealthy mothers. To the point that if there is an emergency and a delivery is held up due to an emergency some expectant mothers say they well sue if their delivery is held up past their planned time.

Those types deserve...

The actual study looked at all births from the early 90's and then the respective academic records from the early 2000's.

Autism study
« Reply #11 on: September 13, 2013, 02:31:09 PM »
I just read an update from one of my resources regarding a possible link to Autism Spectrum Disorder and induced labor and birth.

I can't give a direct link; the studies are discussed in JAMA pediatrics and the NEJM journal watch.
I've never heard of this link but I think there is something to it in my gut.  I would want to know what treatment would help such a thing.